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Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique

A dictators’ clique of China, Russia, Iran and North Korea threatens democracies everywhere. They are more dangerous than any past dictators because they have or are about to have nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. The best way for peace-loving nations to oppose these dictators is through a global coalition centered on the United States and Europe. The U.S. and European democracies led coalitions that defeated dictators in the World War I, World War II and the Cold War. They can do it again.

Illustration on police and minorities by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Deadly Democratic cities

After a speech in Middletown, Pennsylvania, this week, President Trump sat for an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. No doubt it was friendly territory. For the president, Mr. Hannity’s questions were underhand softballs tossed down the center of the plate, and the replies were vintage Trump.

Illustration on the strategic importance of an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward an independent Kurdistan

The autonomous Kurdistan region of northern Iraq held a referendum on independence on Sept. 25. It was overwhelmingly approved. This referendum, not surprisingly however, has precipitously raised tensions not only with Iraq but also with Turkey, Syria and Iran, all of which have large — and restive — Kurdish minorities.

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Claire McCaskill’s crusade could hurt Native American rights

Let’s establish an important legal concept and set the context. The legal term “sovereign immunity,” according to the Wex Legal Dictionary, means that “the government cannot be sued without its consent.” This doctrine has applied to the federal government, states, public universities and Native American tribes for many years.

Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

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Illustration on the necessary nationalism of America and India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why global leaders are putting their countries first

To anyone who listened to President Trump's speech before the U.N. General Assembly in September one thing should have been abundantly clear: The president wasn't there for anyone else's interests but America's.

Illustration on Nigerian terrorism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Thwarting terrorism in Nigeria

"If they fail to give us Biafra, Somalia will look like a paradise compared to what will happen to that 'zoo' (Nigeria)." These are the words of Nnamdi Kanu, leader of the so-called Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB).

Illustration on trump's destructive attitude toward Republicans by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

President Trump's stalled agenda

This has been a rough week or two for President Trump. Most job approval polls are plunging, his secretary of State called him a "moron," and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman says his behavior could put the U.S. "on the path to World War III."

Cyrus Vance, Jr.

A Weinstein verdict to suit the Red Queen

- The Washington Times

Sometimes the lynch mob gets the guilty party, but that's not the way to run a railroad. We have laws, after all, even if some of them are subject to change. But due process is permanent.

Efrain Diaz Figueroa talks to volunteers from "Caritas" at the remains of the house of his sister destroyed by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. Figueroa, who was visiting for a month at her sister Eneida's house when the Hurricane Maria hit the area, also lost her home in the Arroyo community. He waits for a relative to come from Boston and take him to Boston. He says that he is 70 years old and all his life working can't continue in these conditions in Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Exploiting aid to Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico is a mess. But it was a mess before Hurricane Maria swept through with new misery three weeks ago. Electricity is still at a premium. By one estimate, electric power has been restored to only 10 percent of the island's customers.

Figuring Out Paddock Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The making of the Las Vegas murderer

It's been a long week since the largest mass shooting on American soil, which shocked a nation battered by natural disasters. As the FBI searches the killer's house a second time, we have a picture of how the attack took place, the meticulous planning and the heroism of first responders and everyday Americans. What remains a mystery is why? What caused a 64-year-old retired accountant of comfortable means to abandon the high life of a professional gambler and slaughter 58 innocent people?

Gubernatorial candidate Ralph Northam is part of the new trend for Virginia Democrats, who have found that their path to victory runs through the growing suburbs of Washington and Richmond, and the Tidewater area. (Associated Press/File)

The Democratic dilemma in Virginia

The race for governor of Virginia looked like a slam dunk for the Democrats only a fortnight or so ago, and now it doesn't. Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, the Democrat, is still the betting favorite (for people who do that sort of thing), but his double-digit lead in the public-opinion polls has been cut in half.

Millions of dollars in 'oppression'

What does "systemic oppression" look like in 2017? Apparently, a lot like $14.2 million, or the approximate worth of 49ers' safety Eric Reid's contract over the past five years. Where do I line up for such hardship?

Let Taiwan into UNFCCC

The 23rd session of the Conference of Parties (COP23) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which will take place next month in Bonn, Germany, is capturing worldwide attention. COP23 is the latest in the series of Conference of Parties meetings that are signatory to the Kyoto Protocol, an international treaty through which member states commit to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.

Mysteries among books and their rare abodes

"Bibliomysteries," a bibliomystery collection edited by Otto Penzler is a rare prize, and if you can wrench yourself away from the Caxton library, you can find the strangest story of all in the account of how pronghorn antelope were taken from Wyoming to Berlin

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly began by saying, "Although I read it all the time, pretty consistently, I'm not quitting today." (Associated Press)

The general schools doltish press corps

- The Washington Times

Gen. John Kelly stepped to the podium in the White House briefing room and delivered a bare-bottom, wire-brush, red-rash public spanking of the political press Thursday-- the likes of which we have never seen in the age of modern media. Except, perhaps, every single time President Trump addresses the media or hurls fiery bolts of Twitter lightning in their general direction.

Boy Scouts of America leaders say they will start developing the next generation of female leaders and allow families to participate in outdoor activities together. (Associated Press/File)

Boy Scouts are for boys, not girls

- The Washington Times

The Boy Scouts of America just announced it was going to allow girls to take part in its scouting program -- to earn the group's highest leadership rank, the Eagle Scout. This is a mistake. Boy Scouts should stay all boy; similarly, the Girl Scouts should stay all girl.

In this June 5, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in Baltimore. Clinton says she's "shocked and appalled" by the revelations of sexual abuse and harassment being leveled at Harvey Weinstein. She says in a written statement on Oct. 10, that the behavior being reported by women "cannot be tolerated." (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Hillary Clinton, 'appalled' by Harvey Weinstein, still hedges on money

- The Washington Times

Well, finally and at last, and about freaking time. Hillary Clinton came out on CNN on Wednesday to say she was "sick" and "shocked" and "appalled" over the whole Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment-slash-rape allegations floating about the media. But her vow to return Weinstein dollars? Well now, we'll see. Her words suggestion something else.

Then-Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the Justice Department in Washington, in this March 4, 2015, photo. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

NFL kneelers -- all hail the Eric Holder

- The Washington Times

What an interesting connection between one leading voice in the pro-anthem kneeling movement, NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith, and former attorney general, Eric Holder. The former actually worked for the latter. Figures.

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Harvey Weinstein's late accusers

Hillary Clinton: Woods walker, Chardonnay drinker, screamer-into-pillows, sore loser. And now? The recycled claim of Feminist Icon Supporter of All Women. The feminist bar is very low these days.

The honor Jerry Lewis deserved

Legendary entertainer and philanthropist Jerry Lewis has died, after receiving awards from Paris, France, and all over the world, but not from the president of the United States. Why did we deny this icon the opportunity to smell the roses of his success while he lived?