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Sen. Elizabeth Warren. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democrats search for another Lost Cause

- The Washington Times

Union scouts have already discovered Robert E. Lee at the gates of the city, lining up the gallant Pelham’s artillery to fire the opening round, and Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart are expected to arrive on a night train from the Shenandoah Valley.

Illustration on diplomatic options for North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Red-teaming’ the diplomatic option in Korea

Should President Trump meet personally with Kim Jong-un? John Glover, a graduate student at George Mason University wrote an article advocating such a meeting and, frankly, I think that he’s on to something.

Trump's Go-ahead for Infrastructure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Repairing, updating and expanding infrastructure

One of the biggest barriers to investment in infrastructure all across the United States is the long, costly, and unpredictable permitting process. If you have any doubts, just consider the Keystone XL pipeline extension.

Hatred of the Jews returns with a flourish

Anti-Semitism and white supremacy are far from dead in the United States of America. That’s what this past weekend’s violence told the world.

Illustration on men and women in the workplace and attitudes on gender roles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scapegoats, dupes and gulls

Identity politics has gone over the top, and the flood of intolerance is drenching everyone. What began as a campaign to re-right injustice has created injustice. What was meant to change attitudes toward intolerance has become intolerance enthroned.

Illustration on North Korea's backing down by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America’s leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar’s role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

The deadly impact of identity politics

In the aftermath of the horror of the Charlottesville riot, there’s been less condemnation by the media and the left of the neo-Nazi that is charged with murdering Heather Heyer and injuring at least 19 others than there has been of President Trump.

Illustration on the need for a U.S. comprehensive peace strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

In search of a grand U.S. strategy

Richard Nixon’s rapprochement with China, the end of the Cold War, President Obama’s outreach to “the Muslim world,” the growth of the (largely American-funded) United Nations — weren’t such developments supposed to lead to a safer world, one in which the “international community” would embrace “universal values” and pursue common interests — peace and security key among them?

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This Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows hydrocodone pills, also known as Vicodin, arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Leftover opioids are a common dilemma for surgery patients; a study published Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, suggests that after several common operations most don't use all their pills and many store the remainders unsafely at home. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot) ** FILE **

Opioids: In defense of the pain pills

- The Washington Times

If you've never experienced chronic pain, or been around someone with a pain that just won't end, it's easy to dismiss opioids as evil and to make grand calls for their prescription restriction, or even outright bans.

Immigration rights activists chant anti-Trump slogans as they urge Republican lawmakers in Florida to firmly oppose President Donald Trump's proposals to increase funding for immigration enforcement as deadlines for budget decisions near in Congress, Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, in Doral, Fla. Dian Alarcon, second from right, said Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart's office told a smaller group on Tuesday the border wall measure would likely not be approved in the Senate. Diaz-Balart's chief of staff Cesar Gonzalez told members of the media he would not comment. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

Dianne Feinstein rips Trump as 'cruel' for deporting illegals

- The Washington Times

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, on the heels of a deportation that led to a separated family, issued a scathing statement against President Donald Trump, suggesting his border controls were beyond what's necessary for national security. She also called him really, really mean, and that she might tell his mother on him if he doesn't cut it out.

BOOK REVIEW: Three Minutes to Doomsday

Conrad, Ramsey and others in this spy ring gave the Soviets American's defensive war plans, nuclear launch codes and other military secrets. It was a devastating breach of security.

FILE - In this July 4, 2017, file photo, a U.S. missile defense system called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, is seen at a golf course in Seongju, South Korea. North Korea claims it is in the final stages of preparing a plan to launch four intermediate-range ballistic missiles over Japan and into waters just off the island of Guam, where about 7,000 U.S. troops are based. The U.S. has pumped billions of dollars into its missile defense systems and sold hundreds of millions of dollars' worth to its allies, including the very controversial deployment of a state-of-the-art system known by its acronym, THAAD, in South Korea. (Kim Jun-beom/Yonhap via AP, File)

The South Pacific's strategic role

With the growing threat of long-range ballistic missile launches from North Korea, a new front has opened up in the Pacific's strategic framework: The South Pacific.

Illustration on Trump and the TPP by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump can learn from Barack Obama's TPP mistakes

During the 2016 campaign, Donald Trump bucked party orthodoxy on the left and the right, promising to withdraw from the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) and re-negotiate America's "horrible trade deals," including the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The president's pledge to stand up for American workers and businesses helped cement the election, moving voters in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Ohio and flipping those states red.

Illustration on diffusing conflict with Qatar by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Bringing Qatar back from open conflict with its brothers

The dispute between Qatar and its Arab neighbors hurts everyone involved. Qatar had agreed to cooperate with the other governments including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. Instead, they are involved in a boycott that verges on open warfare.

Getting students safely to and from school is a top priority. The AAA School Safety Patrol Program helps ensure that kids can do that. Ushers lead kids across intersections. (AAA)

School safety patrols: Priority No. 1

- The Washington Times

When it comes to education, it should go without saying that teaching and learning are the top priorities inside schoolhouses. Getting students safely to and fro, then, is Priority No. 1.

Former National Security Adviser Susan E. Rice's checkered history continues to haunt her in the post-Obama era. (Associated Press)

Susan Rice's ridiculous North Korea recommendation to Trump

- The Washington Times

Susan Rice offered up some recommendations to President Trump, on his dealings with North Korea, that went pretty much like this: Do nothing. Her advice, by way of an opinion piece in the New York Times, is titled, "It's Not Too Late on North Korea." A better title, though, is this: "Why America's So Happy Barack Obama's Gone."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Ky. listens during a news conference on Capitol Hill Washington on Aug. 1, 2017. (Associated Press) **FILE**

An open letter to Mitch McConnell and Congress

Really, Mitch McConnell? You think President Trump has "excessive expectations" about wanting to get things done for the American people? Was seven years not enough for you and your colleagues to come up with a plan to repeal and replace Obamacare?

Russia probe may see indictments by Mueller

The grand jury is the prosecutor's best friend: If he wants to get rid of a weak, unpopular or politically incorrect situation, he does a "slow roll" to the grand jury and then says, "Well, the grand jury refused to indict," and shrugs his shoulders. The case -- and whatever controversies are associated with it -- simply goes away and the prosecutor washes his hands of it.