Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Claire McCaskill’s crusade could hurt Native American rights

Let’s establish an important legal concept and set the context. The legal term “sovereign immunity,” according to the Wex Legal Dictionary, means that “the government cannot be sued without its consent.” This doctrine has applied to the federal government, states, public universities and Native American tribes for many years.

Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

Illustration on salvaging the U.S./Iran nuclear agreement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s third way

President Trump made a tough call last week. European diplomats and an “echo chamber” in the mainstream media were insisting he “recertify” the nuclear weapons deal his predecessor concluded with Iran’s rulers in 2015.

The Clinton Protection Racquet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary and Harvey’s shared fate

I have been fascinated by Harvey Weinstein’s initial response to charges that the Bathrobed Romeo sexually molested women. His statement was at once otherworldly and yet weirdly similar to Hillary Clinton’s eventual response to the scandal. I say “eventual response” because it took her over a week to comment. Obviously, Hillary’s lawyers and public relations magicians had to word her response very carefully.

Illustration on the failure to "contain" Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How America has failed to contain Russia

Seventy years ago, George Kennan’s “Sources of Soviet Conduct” set the course for U.S. containment policy toward the Soviet Union. Following the Soviet Union’s collapse and a decade of economic turmoil which resulted in reduced Russian regional as well as global influence, President Vladimir Putin began implementing a national security strategy to resurrect Russia’s great power status. He wanted Russia to be perceived as equal in stature to the United States and to ensure western ideals of freedom, liberty, and democracy would not threaten his regime security.

Teaching the Birds and Bees at School Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How federally funded sex education sexualizes schoolchildren

Upon returning to middle school from an orthodontist appointment to tighten his braces, 12-year-old Johnny struggles through a pre-algebra lecture then schlepps off to his health class where he is instructed in anal sex, oral sex, masturbation and sexual fantasy.

William Dodd Jr. speaks on the radio during debate within the United States on whether to enter World War II. International News Service photo.

How Russians meddled in the 1938 election

Did Russia meddle in the 2016 presidential election? President Donald Trump emphatically says “no.” But the hierarchy of the U. S. intelligence community is equally firm in saying “yes.” With three probes in progress — two by Congress, another by an independent counsel — an answer perhaps will eventually be found.

Related Articles

Illustration on preventing Iranian nuclearization by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Iran must be denuclearized

America must not permit Iran to produce nuclear weapons. If a rogue state, the world's No. 1 supporter of terrorism, is allowed to go into the production of nuclear weapons, no other state can be denied them. Proliferation -- in self-defense -- will go wild, and the result will be a world of nuclear horror and chaos, from which there is no return. Here's how it will happen -- and how it can be avoided.

National Identity Restored Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A victory for religious freedom

Last week's guidance memo from the U.S. attorney general -- directing government officials to stop finding ways to make it more difficult for people of faith to live out their beliefs -- is as welcome as it should be unnecessary.

Illustrationon the lecherous culture of Hollywood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A great movie but a lousy life

What is it about these pathetic men with a paunch who imagine their looks and libidos are immortal, and think their excuse for manliness continues to attract sweet young flesh? You might ask some of the women.

Illustration on the legal protections of employees who demonstrate on the job by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Taking a knee and protected speech

Sometimes the public expression of unwanted ideas reaches directly into our living rooms. When President Trump attacked a half-dozen or so professional football players who, instead of standing during the traditional playing of the national anthem prior to football games, "took a knee" by kneeling on one or both of their knees during the anthem, hundreds more players on national television took a knee in defiance of the president.

University Snowflake Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Censorship in Seattle

If it were a plague, the government would rush to quarantine the infected, as occurred during Europe's Black Death in the 14th century.

Illustration on tax reform and trucking by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Trump tax plan to drive economic growth

Trucking is the lifeblood of the American economy. We merge millions of people and machines, 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, to transport nearly every product produced, manufactured and sold. Trucks move approximately 70 percent of the nation's freight, and four out of five communities rely solely on us to deliver the goods to run their businesses, feed their families and fill their homes.

'Mockingbird' offensive

As a full-time sixth-grade substitute teacher, I have discovered that the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book "To Kill a Mockingbird" has multiple usages of the N-word.

President Donald Trump gives thumbs up as he boards Air Force One as he departs Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., as he travels to Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Unplugging the Obama power scheme

New ideas sell better than old, and the trendy idea at the moment, the equivalent of that aroma that comes with new cars, is climate change. Or more precisely, global warming. (New labels are prescribed for fads getting soggy around the edges.) Then along came Donald Trump, who was unafraid to ask the simple question that Al Gore and his anvil chorus dreaded someone asking: Is the current view of how climate works actually accurate? The next generation deserves an honest answer.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., questions Wells Fargo Chief Executive Officer and President Timothy Sloan as he testifies before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Where disaster lurks online

The Democrats pretend to be the party that knows all about high tech. But some of them would get lost on a leisurely Sunday-afternoon drive through Silicon Valley. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, whom the Great Mentioner has suggested for consideration as the Democratic nominee for president, circa 2020, has inserted a couple of provisions into the National Defense Authorization Act which, if enacted, would put in jeopardy just about every Pentagon computer system and leave the country less safe, but — and here's why the Warren mischief is so attractive to Democrats — make the bureaucracy much bigger.

Assessing predatory behavior before it happen

Angela Rose, a survivor activist and the founder and executive director of Promoting Awareness/Victim Empowerment (PAVE), goes on to state that this event that happened 20 years ago had profoundly changed her life. She notes that when Steve Kardian heard her story, he told her that she was lucky to be alive. She learned that statistically, the chances of surviving such an ordeal was less than 5 percent.

In this on Aug. 22, 2017, file photo, a sign sponsored by opponents of the new Cook County tax on sweetened beverages is posted in the soda isle of Tischler Finer Foods in Brookfield, Ill. (AP Photo by Sara Burnett File)

Chicago soda tax crumbles -- now, about that gang violence

- The Washington Times

Cook County, Illinois, famous around conservative circles for its Chicago land of outrageous gun control -- a city to point to as an example of how government ought not be run -- may finally have hit one out of the ballpark. Cook County Board of Commissioners voted 15-1 to roll back a soda tax -- a 1-cent-per-ounce soda tax that had just been implemented a couple months ago. If only they could solve their gun crime problems so quickly.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a keynote conversation at the 2017 Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

Hell on the (Canadian) border

Canada is experiencing a sharp surge of illegal aliens, and they're not just a few angry Hillary voters making good on their bluster about moving north if Donald Trump won the election.

A man is detained by Border Patrol officials after breaching border fencing separating San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, in San Diego. The man, who said he was from Chiapas, Mexico, was detained by agents as they prepared for a news conference to announce that contractors have begun building eight prototypes of President Donald Trump's proposed border wall with Mexico. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Stalling the wall

There's something that doesn't love a wall, wrote the poet Robert Frost, and that something for the moment is comprised of Democrats. President Trump's long-promised wall along the U.S. border with Mexico is slowly rising from the desert floor and his noisy political opponents are mounting a campaign to bring it down.

Illustration on religious tolerance in Bahrain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dispelling ignorance, the enemy of peace

In the Kingdom of Bahrain, for centuries we have grown up with neighbors of all faiths, all cultures and all ethnicities, so we are happy and comfortable living in a multicultural, multifaith society, and we recognize this diversity as a natural and normal way of life for us in Bahrain.