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FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2012 file photo, former Vice President Al Gore, Current TV Chairman and Co-Founder, participates in the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena , Calif. Former Vice President Al Gore is suing Al Jazeera America, saying the news network is withholding tens of millions of dollars that it owes for buying Current TV from him and other shareholders for $500 million last year. (AP Photo/Danny Moloshok, File)

EDITORIAL: Al Gore vs. Al-Jazeera

How do you say “buyer’s remorse” in Arabic? The Qatari royal family likely feels the pangs of regret for paying the princely sum of $500 million to Al Gore and friends to give Al-Jazeera America a slot on satellite-TV and cable channels.

CORRECTS DATE - President Barack Obama, right, smiles as he and former NBA basketball player Alonzo Mourning, left, prepare to ride in a golf cart while golfing at Vineyard Golf Club in Edgartown, Mass., on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. Obama is taking a two-week summer vacation on the island. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

The Obama tee party

Trouble in the St. Louis suburbs has rescued President Obama’s vacation. He can play all 18 holes at the country club now, safe in the knowledge that he’s distracting voters from all the scandals, mismanagement and foreign and domestic policies that are the legacy of his administration.

Bogart and Bacall in "To Have and Have Not."

‘Death be not proud’

Robin Williams and Lauren Bacall join this year’s roster of celebrity deaths. Their names and fame preoccupy us in public mourning, though most of us were no closer to them in life than to a movie or television screen.

Expensive Government Music Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A higher scale for music royalties?

Members of Congress are being pressured by lobbyists, songwriters and music-publishing executives to pass legislation artificially forcing copyright royalty rate increases on music.

Tough Pill to Swallow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to slow the pace of medical progress

The Americans infected with the Ebola virus appear to be improving — very welcome news, especially given the virus’s death rate, which is estimated to be as high 90 percent.

NATO Alliance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

As NATO withers, whither NATO?

As world leaders gather for the NATO summit in Wales during the first week of September, they’ll need to do some collective soul-searching on the alliance’s future.

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2014 file photo, Malik Shabazz, center, president of Black Lawyers for Justice and former chairman of the New Black Panther Party, talks with Col. Ron Replogle, left, and Capt. Ron Johnson during a march with protesters in Ferguson, Mo. Shabazz' organization and others, made up mostly of black volunteers, have taken it upon themselves to help keep the peace in Ferguson, confident the protesters are more likely to listen to them than police. (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, David Carson, File)

The Ferguson feeding frenzy

The most poisonous “-ism” now infecting Ferguson, Mo., is not virulent racism. It’s viral narcissism.

Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol is surrounded by media after meeting with protesters Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer has touched off rancorous protests in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Media mantra misses the story as Ferguson explodes

Much of the media mantra in Ferguson, Missouri, followed a simple storyline. An 18-year-old black, known to his friends and family as a “gentle giant,” planned to attend college the following week. As he walked down the street with his friend around noon Saturday, Aug. 9, he met a police officer who gunned him down as he tried to surrender with his hands held high.

President Barack Obama, left, points to Sen. Chris Dodd, D-Conn., center, and Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., right, after signing the Dodd Frank-Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in a ceremony in the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, Wednesday, July 21, 2010.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

EDITORIAL: Economic strangulation with red tape

President Obama knows nothing about making the economy grow. On his watch, America’s gross domestic product has inched forward at an annual average of 1.2 percent, according to World Bank data. We’re outclassed not only by Brazil, China and India, but by Mali, Guatemala, Swaziland and Vanuatu.

Gun-grabber Bloomberg’s epic fail in Milwaukee

Billionaire Michael R. Bloomberg could learn a thing or two from the biblical story about an Israelite soldier named David, who went up against Goliath, a giant of a man and a powerful foe.

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Former CIA officer Will Hurd is running for a U.S. House seat in Texas, in a district that includes the Mexico-U.S. border,

'National security' candidate: Former CIA officer runs for U.S. House seat in Texas

- The Washington Times

He is a former clandestine officer who's gone into Lone Star politics. That would be conservative Will Hurd, who has joined the list of "national security" candidates who've caught the notice of John Bolton. Indeed, Mr. Hurd is challenging Democrat Rep. Pete Gallego in the 23rd District of Texas, which includes much of the Mexican-American border, in a pivotal area where voter support is much coveted by the GOP.

GOP and Healthcare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Republicans can win on health care

This should be a banner year for the Republican Party. Democrats are stuck with health care reform that most people don't like.

Illustration on Obama's fading popularity by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Democrats feel a fall in the air

President Obama is on a two-week vacation in Martha's Vineyard, as wars rage across the Middle East and Ukraine, terrorists threaten to topple Iraq, and Republicans are on the brink of capturing the Senate.

The New York headquarters of ratings agency Standard & Poor's is pictured in 2011. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: It's not inequality, stupid

Decrying income inequality is growing more popular with the shrill voices on the left as their policy nostrums, including the stimulus that didn't stimulate, have left crippled the economy, with more than 40 million Americans looking for jobs.

Anti-Semitism in Hungary Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democracy's dangerous descent in Hungary

The famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal often said, "Where democracy is strong, it is good for Jews; where it is weak, it is bad for Jews." Today, 100,000 Jews in Hungary are worried about their future.

Muneer Awad, Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations - Oklahoma Chapter, left, answers questions during a news conference concerning a recently passed Oklahoma ballot measure prohibiting state courts from considering international law or Islamic law when deciding cases, in Oklahoma City, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010. At right is Imad Enchassi, Imam - Islamic Society of Greater Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

EDITORIAL: Where is Muslim outrage?

Khaled Sharrouf and a buddy were arrested in Australia in 2007 for making bombs to use against civilians in Melbourne and Sydney. They pleaded guilty and were sentenced to four years in prison for "terrorist activity."

IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR SCHOLASTIC INC AND LOS ANGELES UNIVERSAL PRESCHOOL (LAUP) - New York City Mayor, Bill de Blasio, addresses the country's first PreK Nation at the Scholastic Inc. headquarters in Soho, on Tuesday, August 5, 2014 in New York. The PreK Nation Summit advocates to increase access to quality preschool for all children. (Photo by Stuart Ramson/Invision for Scholastic Inc and Los Angeles Universal Preschool (LAUP)/AP Images)

Attacking achievement in New York City

New York's mayor, Bill de Blasio, like so many others who call themselves "progressive," is gung-ho to solve social problems.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks to guests before President Barack Obama offers a toast at a dinner for the U.S. Africa Leaders Summit, on the South Lawn of the White House,Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. African heads of state are gathering in Washington for an unprecedented summit to promote business development. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

De Blasio’s reign of error

No one likes to hear these four little words: "We told you so." When it comes to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's political agenda, though, many of us told you so.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Blue-Eyed Boy'

Some nurses called him "The Burn" after he was hideously wounded in a landmine explosion in Vietnam four decades ago.

Capitol Hill staffer Tonya Williams of Washington, D.C. plays with her newborn pug on the east side of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

60 percent of Americans don't trust the federal government with their 'personal information'

- The Washington Times

Maybe it can be blamed on alarming media coverage, maybe not. A new Harris poll finds it can be tough to trust anyone with your personal information these days. Harris finds that 60 percent of Americans don't trust the federal government to handle their information confidentially and securely - a sentiment that has grown by eight percentage points in the past year alone.

Illustration on the effect of high corporate taxes by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

The patriotism of prosperity

A few weeks ago, it was quite revealing — but not surprising — to hear Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew imply that corporate America should willingly pay the highest corporate-tax rates in the world as part of its "patriotic" duty.