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Barack Obama      Associated Press photo

Rough justice for Obama and the Saudis

- The Washington Times

Throwing a stone at Saudi Arabia, where stoning women is the national sport, is great fun, and nobody deserves an occasional stoning like the Saudis, just to let the king and his legion of princes know how it feels.

Illustration on the undermining of the Hyde Amendment by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

The life-saving amendment

Today marks 40 years since the life-saving Hyde Amendment was first enacted. This annual appropriations amendment stops taxpayer dollars from being used to fund most abortions and abortion coverage through government programs like Medicaid.

A Complete Takeover Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS in the Middle East and now here

A comprehensive strategy to defeat Islamic supremacists must include not only a war plan to defeat the enemy on the active battlefields of the Middle East, but it must also address how to defeat this enemy now inside the United States.

Illustration contrasting the media vetting of candidates Obama and Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A biased media in action

- The Washington Times

If Donald Trump becomes the next president of the United States he’ll be more thoroughly vetted by the media than Barack Obama.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 file photo, smoke rises over Saif Al Dawla district, in Aleppo, Syria. Residents in the rebel-held districts of Aleppo have a reprieve from the incessant bombings by Syrian government warplanes and the promise of an end to the crippling siege that has left produce stalls bare. (AP Photo/ Manu Brabo, File)

Vladimir Putin’s bombings

Donald Trump, who has been Vladimir Putin’s chief U.S. apologist, remains strangely mute about the rising death toll caused by Russian airstrikes on Syrian hospitals and other civilians in Aleppo.

Madison Gesiotto, Miss Ohio 2014, also writes the 'Millennial Mindset' column for The Washington Times.

Why I’m a Miss USA competitor supporting and inspired by Donald Trump

The stage lights burned brightly. An audience of thousands stretched out into the dark recesses of the arena. I was standing on the Miss USA stage, a dream come true for so many young women and an incredible memory that I will treasure for years to come. But, an even greater experience that stemmed from my time at Miss USA was my time with Donald Trump.

Illustration on Israel's nuclear strategy in light of use of nuclear weapons by other actors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

On the eve of new atoms

The first post-World War II employment of nuclear weapons will probably be launched by North Korea or Pakistan. Should circumstances actually turn out this way, the resultant harms would impact not only the aggressor state and its victims, but also selected strategic nuclear policies in certain other states. The most significant example of such an impact would likely be Israel.

A Bangladeshi rickshaw transports a passenger in Old Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Rickshaws are the most popular means of public transport in Dhaka. (AP Photo/A.M.Ahad)

Restoring free trade with Bangladesh

Since achieving independence in 1971, Bangladesh has been a strong friend and ally of the United States. Once defined by humanitarian help and development support, the relationship between the United States and Bangladesh is now firmly based on bilateral trade and investment. Today, Bangladeshi products find their way into virtually every American household.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Related Articles

Illustration on Obama's exit before the consequences by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

War clouds are gathering

This summer, President Obama was often golfing. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were promising to let the world be. The end of summer seemed sleepy, the world relatively calm.

Illustration contrasting Trumpand Hillary on Islamic jihadism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More terror, more denials

In Florida Monday, following the bombings in New York and New Jersey, Donald Trump referred to the captured bombing suspect, Ahmad Khan Rahami, as an "evil thug." He then added, "Hillary Clinton is a weak and ineffective person and I will tell you, if you choose Donald Trump, these problems are going to go away far, far greater than anybody would think."

Illustration on the 2016 presidential contest by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pop goes the presidency

Every presidential campaign draws on familiar pop culture references to bring the candidates down to earth. Critics use the references to illuminate the differences between voters of different generations.

Trump Boxing Glove Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Trump can knock out Hillary in the first debate

- The Washington Times

It promises to be the greatest show on earth: the first presidential debate to be held Monday night at Hofstra University in New York. Rarely has a political event attracted this kind of Super Bowl-level excitement, curiosity and anticipation. Then again, rarely have we had two presidential candidates who light up the political sky like Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

Illustration on 800 persons being granted citizenship rather than deportation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The U.S. immigration system in chaos

Germans proving they're not sheeple are rejecting their mass-immigration-promoting ruling party in elections. The U.S. immigration system, in chaos, "mistakenly" gives citizenship to 800 immigrants ordered deported. Two foreign-born Islamists go on terror rampages in the United States.

What about gang violence?

During my lifetime, both Democratic and Republican presidents, House and Senate members and the mainstream media have shown just how out of touch they are with regular Americans.

Emmys show Hollywood's decline

The insidious injustice of O.J. Simpson getting away with a vicious double murder and then being honored by dominating the Emmy Awards comes as no surprise, as it headlines the reckless decline of the entertainment industry ("'Game of Thrones,' 'Veep' take top honors at Emmys," Web, Sept. 18).

Oklahoma Justice Reform Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Modernizing the justice system

As governor of Oklahoma, I've seen first-hand the profound impact incarceration has had on our families, children, communities and state.

United States President Barack Obama addresses the 71st session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters, Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Obama at the United Nations

President Obama deserves credit for consistency. At home or abroad, he never misses an opportunity to cite failings and weaknesses of the country that twice elected him president. He was at it again Tuesday at the United Nations General Assembly, where envy of the West is never sated.

Jason Falconer, who operates a firearms training facility and works part-time with the Avon Police Department. (Avon Police Department/St Cloud Times via AP)

A good guy with a gun

Dahir Ahmed Adan is the Somali terrorist who wandered through the Crossroads Mall in St. Cloud, Minn., with a sharp knife, taking a religious census. He demanded of shoppers whether they were "Christians or Muslims," and put his knife to the Christians.

Friendly Octopus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Old friends and presidential politics

Sitting at a bar on the outskirts of Pittsburgh before a reunion party for the class of 1959 of a nearby suburban high school, I heard the same thing from two people entering the restaurant: "Um, these people are really old. Are you sure we're at the right reunion?"

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2016 file photo, handguns are displayed at the Smith & Wesson booth at the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show in Las Vegas. Nearly two-thirds of Americans expressed support for stricter gun laws, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll released Saturday, July 23, 2016. A majority of poll respondents oppose banning handguns. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Why millennials are skeptical of gun control

For the mediaocracy and pundit class, determining the opinions of millennials on all sorts of topics is the great 21st-century parlor game. And it seems that nothing confuses them more -- or upsets them, for that matter -- than when forced to confront millennial attitudes about guns.

Illustration on Obama Cabinet members violations of the Hatch Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Partisan politics in the Cabinet

The Obama administration repeatedly allows senior officials to unlawfully meddle in politics without being held accountable. In just the latest incident, Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Julian Castro in July was found to have violated a law designed to ensure that federal officials work on behalf of all Americans, not their political party.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while she remarks on the explosion in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood onboard her campaign plane at Westchester County Airport, in White Plains, N.Y., Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary, Donald and the birthers' demise

Did you see the interview over the weekend of a listless and apparently exhausted Hillary Clinton? Supposedly she has recovered from last week's bout with pneumonia, but you could have fooled me. Call me a hypochondriac, but in my opinion her recovery is not going very well.