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Illustration on Israel's nuclear strategy in light of use of nuclear weapons by other actors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

On the eve of new atoms

The first post-World War II employment of nuclear weapons will probably be launched by North Korea or Pakistan. Should circumstances actually turn out this way, the resultant harms would impact not only the aggressor state and its victims, but also selected strategic nuclear policies in certain other states. The most significant example of such an impact would likely be Israel.

A Bangladeshi rickshaw transports a passenger in Old Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Rickshaws are the most popular means of public transport in Dhaka. (AP Photo/A.M.Ahad)

Restoring free trade with Bangladesh

Since achieving independence in 1971, Bangladesh has been a strong friend and ally of the United States. Once defined by humanitarian help and development support, the relationship between the United States and Bangladesh is now firmly based on bilateral trade and investment. Today, Bangladeshi products find their way into virtually every American household.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Illustration on the Colombia peace accord and cocaine exportation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Purchasing peace with cocaine?

Ninety-five percent of the cocaine sold on the streets of the United States today comes from Columbia. What’s more, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, the State Department and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime all agree that the cultivation of coca, the plant used for making cocaine, is surging again in Colombia

John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Related Articles

Illustration on Obama Cabinet members violations of the Hatch Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Partisan politics in the Cabinet

The Obama administration repeatedly allows senior officials to unlawfully meddle in politics without being held accountable. In just the latest incident, Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Julian Castro in July was found to have violated a law designed to ensure that federal officials work on behalf of all Americans, not their political party.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while she remarks on the explosion in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood onboard her campaign plane at Westchester County Airport, in White Plains, N.Y., Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary, Donald and the birthers' demise

Did you see the interview over the weekend of a listless and apparently exhausted Hillary Clinton? Supposedly she has recovered from last week's bout with pneumonia, but you could have fooled me. Call me a hypochondriac, but in my opinion her recovery is not going very well.

Illustration on political correctness applied to fiction by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Political correctness' finds a new target

In "Nineteen Eighty-Four," George Orwell's classic novel about a totalitarian and dystopian future, the ruling Party develops "Newspeak" as way to limit freedom of expression and thought. So, for example, "goodthink" refers to thoughts approved by the Party. That which is not "goodthink" is apt to be "crimethink."

Government often problem, not solution

Many members of the mainstream press have been conditioned to believe that if someone hurts or if there is a problem in society, government must act. Not the private sector; not individual Americans; and not churches or non-profits, but government.

A man fills out paperwork before selling a handgun to a first-time gun owner at Metro Shooting Supplies, in Bridgeton, Missouri. In 2000, 51 percent of Americans said guns made homes more dangerous, according to Gallup, the polling firm. By last year that had dropped to 30 percent, with a full 63 percent now saying guns made a home "safer."

Guns and hysteria

Nobody does hysteria better than The New York Times, and over the years the editorial page of the old gray lady has fulminated most over the Second Amendment. The very idea of guns frightens the old gray lady beyond her feminist endurance.

Emergency personnel work at the scene of Saturday's explosion on West 23rd Street in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016, in New York. Ahmad Khan Rahami, wanted in the bombings that rocked Chelsea and a New Jersey shore town was captured Monday after being wounded in a gun battle with police that erupted when he was discovered sleeping in a bar doorway, authorities said. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

Terror in the streets, again

Reality is rarely kind to the purveyors of fantasies. Barack Obama and his administration have tried for eight years to persuade everyone that Islamic terror is merely a figment of the imaginations of bigots, racists and other bad people. But he can't seem to get the memo to the radical Islamic terrorists, who keep trying to blow up Jews, Christians and other infidels, and often succeed.

Wrecking the economics of Medicare drugs

Washington bean counters don't set the prices of houses or vehicles. Buyers and sellers settle on mutually agreeable prices. That's why there isn't a nationwide shortage of duplexes or jeeps.

Don't vote with emotions

Defying virtually all the pundits' predictions, Donald Trump has defeated 16 of his opponents. Just a few weeks ago these same pundits resurrected their strongly felt predictions that Mr. Trump was "finished." After being 0 for 16, a person would be rethinking his or her position, right? Wrong.

Red Tape Attack on Coatings Industry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rolling out the red tape

Here's one thing everyone can agree on: Federal regulatory and international tax policy implications can be as exciting as, well, watching paint dry.

Promotional poster for Clinton, Inc.         The Washington Times

'Clinton Inc.'

What a difference a week makes. A week after Hillary Clinton stumbled, both literally -- at a Sept. 11 memorial -- and figuratively -- by calling half of Donald Trump supporters "a basket of deplorables" -- polls show that the race for the White House is essentially tied.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Germain Arena, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016, in Ft. Myers, Fla. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

A reality check of the election

Government spending and borrowing are once again growing as a percentage of GDP. The federal debt held by the public was 35 percent in 2007. It is 74 percent today, and is projected to be 140 percent in 2046 — provided nothing goes wrong.

Illustration on union leveraging against employers through safety inspections by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Pushing back against a union foot in the door

For small businesses, the most valuable asset is their employees. Without productive workers and a positive workplace environment, a business cannot thrive against tough competition from other firms, large and small.

Michael Dukakis (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Reading the handwriting on the wall

- The Washington Times

Everything old becomes new, if you wait long enough. Barack Obama "reassures" the nation in the wake of another radical Islamic attack on New York City and in nearby New Jersey, and a frenzy of stabbing in a shopping mall in Minnesota.

Illustration on Edward Snowdon by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Edward Snowden's gambit

In 2013, a dishonest man with a fabricated record in government service made a decision that did more damage to U.S. national security than any other individual in our nation's history. His subsequent actions deeply betrayed the American people.

Tents used by the homeless line a downtown Los Angeles street with the skyline behind Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Los Angeles officials say they will declare a state of emergency on homelessness and propose spending $100 million to reduce the number of people living on city streets. City Council President Herb Wesson, members of the council's Homelessness and Poverty Committee and Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the plan Tuesday outside City Hall, as homeless people dozed nearby on a lawn.(AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

A poor way to measure poverty

Poverty is down, the latest Census Bureau report shows. Good news, to be sure, but some context is needed. A closer look at the data reveals that things aren't necessarily the way they appear.