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FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, President-elect Donald Trump walks with CKE Restaurants CEO Andy Puzder from Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Trump is expected to add another wealthy business person and elite donor to his Cabinet, with fast food executive Andrew Puzder as Labor secretary. In the background is Vice President-elect Mike Pence. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A pro-jobs Labor Secretary

Andy Puzder knows what works and doesn’t work in the real marketplace for labor.

In this Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents pass a section of border wall in Hidalgo, Texas. The idea of a concrete wall spanning the entire 1,954-mile southwest frontier collides head-on with multiple realities, like a looping Rio Grande, fierce local resistance, and cost. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Taking back the border

Donald Trump may have shocked the world when he was elected president of the United States, but Latino voters proved to be an even bigger surprise. Election Day exit polling showed that Mr. Trump gained 2 percent more Latino voters than Mitt Romney did in 2012, winning a total 29 percent of 13 million Latino voters.

Illustration on the Obama legacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Time

Assessing the Obama legacy

In his 2016 State of the Union address, President Obama summarized his achievements. That same night, the White House issued a press release touting Mr. Obama’s accomplishments.

Choose Your Fuel at the Pump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rethinking the ethanol standard

President-elect Donald Trump cruised to victory promising to get rid of the mandate to buy health insurance. While he’s at it, how about getting rid of the mandate to buy ethanol?

Chattering Filibuster Teeth Unhinged Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Disabling Senate filibuster abuse

Voters might justifiably assume that having now gained control of Congress and the White House, Republicans have complete power to enact all campaign promises in the last election. But without changes to the filibuster, Senate minority Democrats can still block Republican reforms.

Europe's Recent Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s epochal elections

“The novelty and magnitude of Europe’s predicament make it difficult to understand, tempting to overlook, and nearly impossible to predict. Europe marches us all into terra incognita.” That’s how I closed an article 10 years ago on the topic of Islam’s future in Europe.

The key to engaging with Hispanics

I was reminded this week of 1980, when my father — who was the founder of a national organization representing the interests of Hispanic business owners — got involved with the presidential election in order to support Ronald Reagan.

Illustration on drug use in America by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

How to end America’s drug crisis

As President Trump prepares to confront multiple crises, including national security, foreign policy, and immigration, another crisis looms. It kills tens of thousands of young Americans annually, inflicting unparalleled suffering on American families.

Illustration on matching tax cuts with cuts in government spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A model for making tax cuts work

Before President-elect Donald Trump has fully fleshed out his policy agenda, House Republicans are already planning to slam through Congress their own program of repealing Obamacare, repealing regulations Barack Obama issued in the last 60 legislative days of his administration, and enacting substantial tax cuts.

Hirohito Flag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The incomplete legacy of Pearl Harbor

After 75 years, there are still so many stories about the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on Dec. 7, 1941, including the tragic loss of more than 2,300 American servicemen, the destruction of 18 ships, the loss of over 150 aircraft and even the element of surprise on that Sunday morning.

The BuzzFeed website is displayed on an iPad held by an Associated Press staffer in Los Angeles on Sept. 1, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Gay liberals whiff on trying to bully Christians

An important paradigm shift seems to be happening. Case in point: Typical gay liberals decide to publicly bully Christians because of their faith. Bullies then expect all hell to break loose, with targeted Christians being frightened into either disavowing aspects of their faith or, more likely, their business or livelihood being destroyed after a campaign of public hate and derision.

Nancy Pelosi (Associated Press)

The revolt of the peasants gathers steam

- The Washington Times

The populist saber continues to cut the elites down to size. The elites, who think they know it all and are uniquely qualified to tell everyone else how to live, took another pasting Sunday in the Italian elections. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi felt so humiliated by voter rejection of his proposals for constitutional reform that he quit on the spot.

Illustration on Chinese industrial pollution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s China challenge

President Donald Trump will reject one concept and embrace another as he confronts China on trade and pollution. He expressed skepticism for “the concept of global warming created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. industry noncompetitive.”

Illustration on keeping military strategy secret by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

From Churchill’s lips to Trump’s ears

In the third and final presidential debate, Republican nominee Donald Trump claimed that U.S. foreign policy regularly fails to engage “the element of surprise” when it comes to engaging the Islamic State, or ISIS. According to Mr. Trump, our enemies “have all left” the Iraqi city of Mosul because ISIS was given warning months in advance.

Trucking Delivers the Holidays Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trucking delivers the holidays

Family gatherings with a delicious turkey on the table. Friends and communities joining together for holiday traditions. Stores and sidewalks bustling as we shop for presents to exchange with loved ones. Wreaths on doors and ornate decorations lighting up downtowns.

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Illustration on Trump's enthusiasm for India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A 'big fan' of India waits in the wings

As the dust settles on the most divisive and rancorous election campaign in American history, India, like the rest of the world, is coming to terms with Republican Donald Trump as the next president of the world's most powerful country.

Illustration on making America great again by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An American renewal

Slowly and perhaps even surely, Donald Trump is pulling together a team he believes can help him achieve his goals. Which are what exactly?

Dutch Canary Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The canary in the free speech coal mine

A safety practice used in the early days of coal mining involved the use of canaries. Since these birds were susceptible to the ill effects of deadly toxic gas exposure before humans, caged canaries brought into the mines were closely monitored as an early warning system of lurking danger.

Sally Abrahamsen (right), of Pompano Beach, Fla., holds a Glock 42 pistol while shopping for a gun at the National Armory gun store and gun range in Pompano Beach on Jan. 5, 2016. At left is salesperson T.J. O'Reilly. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Armed and alive

Sunrise, Fla.: A burglar was fatally shot Monday after breaking into a home in the 4300 block of Northwest 103rd Terrace in Sunrise, authorities said. Police said the suspect was taken to Broward Health Medical Center, where he later died.

A Vietnamese policeman stands guard as a wreath and an image of the late Cuban President Fidel Castro are placed at the Cuban embassy in Hanoi, Vietnam, Monday, Nov. 28, 2016. Castro, who led his bearded rebels to victorious revolution in 1959, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of 10 U.S. presidents during his half-century of rule in Cuba, died on Friday at age 90. (AP Photo/Tran Van Minh)

The demise of a despot

"We know that this moment fills Cubans with powerful emotions, recalling the countless ways in which Fidel Castro altered the course of individual lives, families, and of the Cuban nation."

Illustration on the infantile reaction of sore losers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'A pack of sore losers'

- The Washington Times

It was election night 1960 and as the votes trickled in, those surrounding Vice President Richard Nixon were convinced Democratic vote fraud in Illinois and Texas were about to cost their man the White House in the closest presidential election since 1840.

Illustration on history's proper focus on the America people beyond the activities of their government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pancake politics

With the presidential and congressional elections over -- and with no really big, substantive news emerging until Inauguration Day -- the nation's capital is settling down to some richly deserved obscurity.

Illustration on the problematic Zumwalt class destroyer by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Navy's Zumwalt problem

Some problems in life are so big they defy summary, maybe even resolution. Still, they are important. On the list go societal differences about religion, politics, and now the U.S. Navy's Zumwalt-class destroyer.

BOOK REVIEW: 'War Diaries 1939-1945'

It's no accident that the publisher of this book saw fit to put "Author of 'Pippi Longstocking'" after Astrid Lindgren's name, for that classic children's book is not merely the chief, but perhaps the sole, reason she is known.

Illustration on the Castor era by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The left's love affair with Fidel Castro

In a statement following the death of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, President Obama spoke of "the countless ways in which [Castro] altered the course of individual lives, families, and of the Cuban nation."

Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The melting of campus snowflakes

- The Washington Times

Academic freedom, once so popular in the faculty lounges, appears to be optional on many campuses where college presidents wilt under the first squeals of snowflakes.

Grinch Giving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The charities that stole Christmas

Deciding which charities to donate to this holiday season can be tough. That's especially true at a time when the news is full of charitable organizations that seem to have less than charitable intentions.

A woman walks past a photo of the late Fidel Castro at a memorial to honor him in Guanabacoa on the outskirts of Havana, Cuba, Monday, Nov. 28, 2016. Tribute sites are set up in hundreds of places across the country to bid farewell Castro, who died on Nov. 25 at age 90. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

The death of a tyrant

Speaking ill of the dead is not nice, as most of us learn at mother's knee, but there are exceptions. Fidel Castro deserves no nice thoughts simply because he's dead. He was a despot and a tyrant, an unrepentant rogue with the conscience of a hangman, and we can be glad that he's dead.

More left-wing double standards

Since the average four-year-old can grasp the concepts of 'same' and 'different,' perhaps our entire society -- particularly the progressive left -- will see that there is no difference between Mathew Blanchfield, CEO of 1st in SEO, and the unfortunate business owners who refused to provide cake and floral services for gay weddings ("CEO Mathew Blanchfield tells pro-Trump, Republican clients to take a hike: 'You are not welcome,'" Web, Nov. 23).

Israel's 'wildfires' deliberate

Apologists claim that there are many Arabs who are against terrorism. If this were true, these anti-terror Arabs would humiliate their terrorist brothers and punish them. They would make the thought of terrorism anathema so that no one would burn or decapitate Israelis or Jews.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. **File  (Lou Foglia/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)  MANDATORY CREDIT, MAGS OUT, NO SALES; CHICAGO TRIBUNE OUT

The Hole in the Wall Gang

Plain citizens probably shouldn't try this at home. Mayors of American cities large and small are obstructing the nation's immigration laws by harboring illegal aliens and boasting that they will defy anything President-elect Donald Trump can do about it.