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Sebastian Kurz     Associated Press photo

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you’ve lost your mojo.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Oct. 17, 2017.

Schooling the U.S. on economic freedom

Once again, there is more evidence that economic freedom leads to success. Many of the former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have made enormous economic progress from the time they became free almost three decades ago.

Illustration on Richard Nixon's role in the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A faulty retelling of ‘The Vietnam War’

When Richard Nixon was in the White House, I was in Vietnam and he was my commander in chief. When I was on Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff, I had the opportunity to brief former President Nixon on numerous occasions and came to admire his analysis of current events, insights on world affairs and compassion for our troops. His preparation for any meeting or discussion was exhaustive. His thirst for information was unquenchable and his tolerance for fools was nonexistent.

Illustration on China's designs on the electric car market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The race for electric vehicle dominance

General Motors and Ford are scurrying to realign for what many believe are the next big things — driverless and electric vehicles (EVs) — but don’t look to Detroit, Japan or Germany for the mighty impulse that transforms personal transportation. With the world’s largest car market and savvy government policies, the advantage goes to China.

Illustration on NATO' difficult situation with member nation Turkey by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving NATO from Turkey

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, known as NATO, faces an existential problem.

A Game of Political Football Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican team with no offense

Is the Republican Party in trouble? The primary fight defeat in Alabama and the quick retirement signal by Sen. Bob Corker are not the only straws in the wind. Current polling shows Republicans trail Democrats by 8 percentage points in a generic 2018 House race.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route Greenville, S.C., for a fundraiser for South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Toward a better nuclear deal with Iran

To hear President Trump’s political opponents describe it, the decision to decertify the Iran Deal is a major miscalculation — a needlessly provocative action that could even bring all-out war.

While early voting may seem more convenient, it actually decreases turnout. (Associated Press/File)

Early voting disadvantages seem to outweigh benefits

Early voting — opening a limited number of locations where people can cast their ballots prior to Election Day — is a “reform” that states should reconsider. Its disadvantages seem to outweigh its benefits.

Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America’s trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump’s intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

Pope Francis, left, asperges incense in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

A step toward ending injustice in abortion

Human liberty and dignity notched a big win earlier this month. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is a landmark step adding further protections for the unborn by criminalizing abortions performed after 20 weeks into a pregnancy.

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Illustration of Harvey Weinstein by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why criticize Harvey Weinstein

Ancient wisdom from a Higher Authority, which is available to anyone who takes the time to consider it, was provided to constrain people like Harvey Weinstein from acts he has been accused of committing.

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964     Associated Press photo

Having fun with diagnosing the Donald

- The Washington Times

Witch doctors are not necessarily more skilled than psychiatrists and psychologists, but they're sometimes harder on the pocketbook. A group of "mental-health professionals" have offered to resolve the Donald Trump "problem" for free. In the learned and precise professional language of their trade, they think he's "nuts."

Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah waves to the media as he arrives to head the Cabinet session in Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' former official resident in Gaza City, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. Hamdallah has held the first government meeting in the Gaza Strip as part of a major reconciliation effort to end the 10-year rift between Fatah and Hamas. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

Less than meets a wary eye

The deal between Mahmoud Abbas' Palestinian Authority on the West Bank and Hamas in the old Gaza Strip is considerably less valuable than it looks. Although Mr. Abbas' West Bank authority will assume civilian responsibilities there, Hamas will remain in control of security, and will neither lay down its weapons nor dismantle its security forces and militias. Hamas has received arms from Iran in the past and now threatens the entire region.

In this Oct. 7, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to reporters before leaving the White House in Washington for a brief stop at Andrews Air Force Base in Md., on his way to Greensboro, N.C. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Nixing the Iran nuclear deal

You have to give a little to get a little. That's the art of the deal. But when Barack Obama bargained with Iran's mullahs over their nuclear program, he gave away the store — including the cash drawer — and only got a little time in return before the advent of the Islamic bomb. Buying peril on the lay-away plan does the world no favors. President Trump calls it "the worst deal ever negotiated," and he wants to alter it. To act in the interest of the United States, after all, is his sworn duty as president and commander in chief.

Conservatism betrayed

"How the Right Lost Its Mind" is an important work. Any serious-minded citizen, no matter of what political persuasion, will benefit from reading it and carefully contemplating the powerful message of its thoughtful, solidly conservative author.

Member of the San Francisco 49ers kneel during the playing of the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

SNYDER: Maybe the country needs a football timeout

Roger Goodell and NFL team owners don't want to hear this, but perhaps the nation would benefit from taking a little football break. The reason doesn't matter, even if it's as irrational as opposition to protests during the national anthem.

Accompanied by Puerto Rican Gov. Ricardo Rossello and first lady Beatriz Rossello, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence greets soldiers at the Muniz National Guard Air Base, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017.  The trip comes days after U.S President Donald Trump visited Puerto Rico and praised relief efforts without mentioning the criticism that the federal response has drawn. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

Mike Pence, mocked for principles the left just can't fathom

- The Washington Times

Mike Pence, post-Colts-49ers walkout, has been mocked mercilessly by a vicious left as little more than a media hog and public relations stuntman for daring to leave the game in protest of players' national anthem kneeling. The left, the suspicious, mega-partisan, ever-political left, just can't believe that someone would actually stand on principle.

In this July 25, 2012, file photo, California Gov. Jerry Brown waits for the start of a news conference to announce plans to build a giant twin tunnel system to move water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to farmland and cities, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

California crazy: Calling a 'he-she' a 'he' can now get you jailed

- The Washington Times

It's madness in California, as Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat, of course, just signed into law a bill that creates special rights for LGBT senior-age adults in long-term nursing care that requires them to be referred to by their gender pronouns of choice. Those who don't? It's off to jail they go. Free speech, anyone?

Vice President Mike Pence takes a photo with a fan before an NFL football game between the Indianapolis Colts and the San Francisco 49ers, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

NFL players union still doesn't get it

- The Washington Times

Sunday, Vice President Mike Pence walked out of the Colts-49ers football game after players fell to their knees in protest of the national anthem. Shortly after, the NFL Players Association released a statement of support for the kneelers. Make that: The tone-deaf NFL Players Association released a statement.

Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper watches his two-run homer in the eighth inning in Game 2 of baseball's National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs, at Nationals Park, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

LOVERRO: Nationals make case for old-school baseball

But if you listened closely enough, you heard cheers for the Nationals Saturday from those around the country in the baseball industry who make their living in hotel rooms at Super 8s and Rodeway Inns, in places like Bozeman, Montana, and Clayton, Alabama.

Illustration on sixties precursors to current violence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old divisions, renewed violence

Virginia Tech, Newtown, San Bernardino, Orlando, Las Vegas ... a roll call of carnage so familiar that we can almost repeat it in our sleep. We read the number of dead and wounded. But these are really tragedies beyond reckoning, as the tears of loved ones wash upon the shores of illimitable grief.

Kennedy's Unopened Door Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ken Burns, JFK and the unopened door

As a Vietnam veteran, I was reluctant to push the Ken Burns Vietnam documentary film button. Would it be little more than painful propaganda? This apprehension was only half right. It's not propaganda. Every American should see it.

Interfering with Foreign Policy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Foreign policy and opportunistic lawsuits

Navigating the shoals of foreign policy is hard at the best times, especially in the Middle East. It becomes impossible if the courts grab hold of the steering wheel. Yet that is the prospect in a case shortly being considered by the Supreme Court.

Aaron Scott, left, prays during a service conducted by Rev. Sarah Monroe, right, at Chaplains on the Harbor church in Westport, Wash., Thursday, June 15, 2017. "I don't think our politicians know how high the stakes are here, and after so many years have gone by with our situation still as devastated as it is, I don't know if they care," Monroe says. "I'm not sure how much worse it can get, and at the same time I'm afraid to see how much worse it can get." (AP Photo/David Goldman)

At last, a president who protects our fundamental religious freedoms

The men who gathered to create our country and the Constitution were a varied group. Many of them were Christians, but some did not believe in the God of the Old and New Testaments. Yet, they proposed to establish a sovereign nation where people of all faiths and no faith would be welcome; where the freedom of conscience and religion would not be violated by the government. In a miracle of the ages, they succeeded in creating the first nation where both those who believe in God and those who don't are safe from government coercion.

Richard Cohen of the Southern Poverty Law Center. **FILE**

Making money on hate

These are not happy times for the Southern Poverty Law Center, which doesn't have a lot to do with the South, poverty or the law, and it thrives far from the center of the political spectrum. The center is mostly a cash machine, and it has raised hundreds of millions of dollars, mostly from well-meaning but gullible liberals — "progressives" in the current argot — in the name of fighting injustice and hate. Lately it has been called out as a hate group itself.