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Hillary Clinton (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Clintons and the comeuppance at hand

- The Washington Times

Reckoning comes late to the Clintons, but it comes. Bubba has skated past a lot of transgressions, always counting on his gift of gab and his deep-dyed Southern charm to escape retribution. He played the charm card with consummate skill: “Aw, shucks, what can you do with a good ol’ boy like me?”

A Defining Moment of Rebellion Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Trump wins

Anew voter coalition is emerging. A new era has begun.

Illustration on reclaiming American employees' stake in industry by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Aligning American firms with American values

During the Reagan administration, American companies believed that in addition to returning profits to their shareholders, they also held a moral obligation to consider the interests of their employees, community and nation.

Members of the Old Guard place flags in front of every headstone at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Thursday, May 26, 2016. Soldiers were to place nearly a quarter of a million U.S. flags at the cemetery as part of a Memorial Day tradition. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Why this Memorial Day is different

If only for just one day, this Memorial Day, let us lay our tightly held political affiliations aside and focus on the lives and ideals that unite us rather than the issues that divide us.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has refused to talk with the inspector general investigating her email system, although secretaries of state who preceded her cooperated with the probe. (Associated Press)

Hillary’s missing messages

The essential issues in Hillary Clinton’s widening email scandal have always been her judgment and her imperious belief that the government’s rules don’t apply to her.

USA Over Regulation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Make trade, not war

In this most unusual of election cycles, American voters appear to be sorting out into two rival camps that are more complicated than the usual left-right divide. A large number of Democratic voters are threatening to go Republican. Many Republicans are threatening to do the same for the Democrats.

Absence of Oppression Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The biggest racial lie

Let’s begin with two statements on race — one that is offensive and false, the other self-evidently true. Taken together, they illuminate the toxic state of the national dialogue on race.

Michael Bloomberg said he thinks he could win some states but "not enough to win the 270 Electoral College votes necessary to win the presidency." (Associated Press)

Confusing Main Street with Wall Street

Billionaire and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg recently complained to a Wall Street gathering that “the Republican Party is no longer the party of business.” He predicted that union members, not corporate executives, would be voting GOP this fall.

Illustration positing the possible national security actions of the presidential candidates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

National security reforms for the next president

“National security” is a highfalutin phrase for a problem that can be stated quite simply: We have enemies. What do we do about them? Since this is a matter of life and death, it’s worth asking: What national security policies can we expect the next commander in chief to implement?

Illustration on why union members should support Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why union workers should vote Republican

Unionized workers should get behind Donald Trump. Leaders of organized labor will see things differently, and that’s a tragedy for their members.

Illustration on Poland's resistance to EU dissemination of Syrian refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Bill Clinton’s affront to Poland

During a recent New Jersey campaign stop in support of his wife’s presidential bid, former President Bill Clinton suggested the people of Poland had decided democracy is too much trouble, and Poles want a Putin-type authoritarian leadership. His comments generated an immediate reaction from Poland’s government and the U.S.-based organization that represents about 10 million Polish-Americans.

Historian Craig Shirley tells Inside the Beltway that "President Reagan would have done everything Barack Obama is not doing" if he had been the president to take on the Islamic State. (Ronald Reagan Foundation & Presidential Library)

Drawing a conservative road map

Donald Trump is not Ronald Reagan, for whom we each worked and ardently supported because of his consistent, thoughtful, effective and eloquent conservatism. But Donald Trump is his own success story, and an American patriot committed to making America great again.

A Fix for Immigration Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fixing the immigration standoff

By and large, liberals favor amnesty for undocumented immigrants, followed by some kind of path, mostly undefined, to citizenship. Conservatives do not believe in rewarding crime — no amnesty, no citizenship — and favor deportation, where possible, or some form of punishment.

Illustration on Taiwan's efforts to fight disease by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

A partner in global health security

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) estimate released on April 21, 2004, a total of 774 lives were claimed in the SARS outbreak in 2003. Far beyond the nations where it claimed the most victims, SARS traumatized the world with vast economic disruptions, deeply impacting international trade and travel that year, and in the nervous months that followed.

Related Articles

Facebook Under Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatives trend liberal over Facebook

Conservatives are hopping mad about Facebook allegedly manipulating its Trending Topics to discriminate against right-leaning news stories. And some want to do something about it. They should count to 10 and take a deep breath.

Destin Cramer, left, and Noah Rice place a new sticker on the door at the ceremonial opening of a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale high school Tuesday, May 17, 2016, in Seattle. President Obama's directive ordering schools to accommodate transgender students has been controversial in some places but since 2012 Seattle has mandated that transgender students be able to use of the bathrooms and locker rooms of their choice. Nearly half of the district's 15 high schools already have gender neutral bathrooms and one high school has had a transgender bathroom for 20 years. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Obama's transgender hypocrisy

- The Washington Times

If President Obama really wants to improve the rights of LGBT persons, he should look externally and take a hard line against those countries that are murdering this population on a daily basis, instead of looking internally and picking a fight with Republicans.

New terms can't whitewash truth

The Democrats are very astute in revising their political vernacular in order to suit their politically deceptive purposes. For example, a "tax-and-spend liberal" has become a "revenue-and-investment progressive." The terms "liberal" and "progressive" are used to disguise a socialist, as evidenced by the evolution of the Democratic Party since 1968.

His story: White House adviser Ben Rhodes wrote that a main objective should be to "reinforce the president and the administration's strength." (Associated Press)

Obama's challenge of Congress

Once upon a time every congressman on Capitol Hill would have put on his fighting clothes to punish someone who not only lied to them about a subject of great national import, but boasted that he lied — and now dares Congress to do something about it.

Theatrical poster for "Clinton Cash"

A movie for Clintonites

A couple of weeks ago I heard the National Symphony perform Shostakovich's symphony commemorating war and revolution, his Symphony 11. There was not much lyricism to it, not even a dulcet tune one could leave the symphony hall whistling. It was all ominous rumbling and groaning, with the tympani madly thundering away.

'Sex change' science fiction

President Obama is deliberately ignoring a scientific fact that everyone should have learned in elementary school ("Obama administration orders transgender bathroom access in all public schools," Web, May 13).

Illustration on the death of Hezbollah commander Mustafa Badreddine by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A death in Damascus, grief in Beirut

Five years ago, during the optimistically named Arab Spring, Syrians staged peaceful protests against the ruling dynasty that had long oppressed them. President Bashar Assad responded brutally: In May 2011, he sent tanks into the suburbs of Damascus, Deraa, Homs and other cities to crush his critics. Civil war followed.

A new sticker designates a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale high school Tuesday, May 17, 2016, in Seattle. President Obama’s directive ordering schools to accommodate transgender students has been controversial in some places but since 2012 Seattle has mandated that transgender students be able to use of the bathrooms and locker rooms of their choice. Nearly half of the district’s 15 high schools already have gender neutral bathrooms and one high school has had a transgender bathroom for 20 years. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

An alternate route to the restroom

Fads were once a rite of the young, but were rarely held to be a civil right. Swallowing goldfish, raiding women's dorms for panties and packing large numbers of students into telephone booths were harmless, though not to everyone's taste.

Illustration on restoring equality in trade by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Re-establishing the meaning of free trade

Donald Trump and Paul Ryan must bridge wide differences on free trade, immigration and other issues to accomplish Republican unity, win in November and govern effectively, but on trade that is hardly an insurmountable task.

Welcome to Saudi Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Saudi solution

As European governments slam the gates shut on illegal Middle Eastern immigrants, where can Syrians and others go, not far from their homelands, for safety and employment? The answer is obvious but surprisingly neglected: to Saudi Arabia and the other rich Arab sheikhdoms.

Lenin Poster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why millennials are warming to socialism

Vermont senator and self-proclaimed "democratic socialist" Bernie Sanders vanquished Hillary Clinton in West Virginia last week with more than 51 percent of the vote, to Mrs. Clinton's 36 percent. The average Appalachian coal miner is not a socialist. Mr. Sanders won because Mrs. Clinton foolishly pledged to destroy the coal industry.

Illustration on the financial failure of Puerto Rico by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A 'get out of jail free card' for Puerto Rico?

Most state and local governments provide defined-benefit pensions to their employees. An employee earns his or her pension benefits over many years of employment, and then receives the benefits throughout retirement. It is "Pension 101" that the employer should set aside enough money throughout the employee's years of service to ensure that the money will be there to pay the pension benefits during retirement.

Illustration on the Obama administrations denial of an entry visa to Afghani vice-president Rashid Dostum by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Betrayal of an Afghan ally

I was dismayed to learn Afghan Vice President Rashid Dostum has been denied a visa. President Obama's team has yet again done damage to a foreign leader who is struggling against radical Islamic terrorism. Of course, the president's team can't even use those words, so it should be no surprise their actions are so off-target.

Jane O'Meara Sanders joins her husband, Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at a campaign rally, Monday, May 9, 2016, in Atlantic City, N.J. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) ** FILE **

Extravagant spending by Bernie Sanders' wife sinks her former school

- The Washington Times

Burlington College, a small Vermont institution once headed by Jane Sanders, the wife of Democratic presidential contender Vermont Sen. Bernard Sanders, will be closing its doors after this school year because of the "crushing weight of the debt" from the purchase Mrs. Sanders made of a new campus in 2010.