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Law Enforcement at the Border Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Immigration reform must start with border enforcement

As a veteran border patrol officer, I can say without any reservations that our immigration system is completely dysfunctional. Immigrants permitted to come to the United States have a cumbersome and expensive time doing so. Those who aren’t permitted to enter waltz across the border by the tens of thousands, and those not allowed to remain here elude deportations, even after committing serious crimes against our citizens.

Palestinian Hamas supporters hold up their hands while chanting Islamic slogans as masked members from the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, a military wing of Hamas, march with their weapons on vehicles during a rally a long the street of Rafah refugee camp, Gaza Strip, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

The next round of Hamas vs. Israel

Words can bewitch. Soon, the seemingly benign phrase “cycle of violence,” will be applied once again to the Hamas-Israel conflict. The linguistic effect of this application will be to equate terrorism and counterterrorism, further blurring the always-essential distinction between international crime and international law enforcement.

Elmar Abdullayev, 55, stands at a gates of his home hit by shelling in a village of Gapinli, in Terter region of Azerbaijan on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. Azerbaijan and separatist forces in Nagorno-Karabakhk on Tuesday agreed on a cease-fire starting noon local time following three days of the heaviest fighting in the disputed region since 1994, the Azeri defense ministry announced. Gapanli, a village south of Terter, has been one of the hardest hit. Houses bear the marks of the recent shelling; metal doors are riddled with shrapnel, power lines are cut down, craters are seen in the yards. (AP Photo/ Hicran Babayev)

An ‘unfrozen’ conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh

Recently, one of Vladimir Putin’s foreign policy functionaries made another outrageous statement on the status of the Azerbaijani region of Nagorno-Karabakh. Evgeniy Satanovsky, the head of Russian Institute of the Near East, visited the separatist region (in contravention of international law) in mid-June and declared: “As I understand it, the issue that Karabakh is part of Azerbaijan, in terms of military logic and from the standpoint of practical politics is completely closed.”

Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they’re watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to “other” the world’s only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia’s McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

Overheated concern about July’s warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the “hottest” month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, “ever”). And future Julys will only become hotter.

Gravesite of Main Stream Media Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The legacy media meltdown over Donald Trump

The meltdown of the American legacy media is now complete. Conservatives are sadly aware of the decline of The New York Times, the supposed “newspaper of record,” as the benchmark for legacy media in general.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

For sale, the most brazen president money can buy

- The Washington Times

It’s coming clear now why Hillary Clinton wanted her own email server, free from oversight by anyone, and why she resisted so ferociously enabling anyone from getting even a hint to what she was hiding. Her presidency, if there is one, has been sold, and a new batch of emails pried out of the government by Judicial Watch reveals the going rate for Hillary.

Gen. Jack Vessey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A soldier’s soldier

Until he died last week at 94, former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. John W. Vessey Jr. was a living memorial to an earlier America — where God and country were not seen as contradictions, where faith formed the bedrock of personal and national character.

Defining alcohol consumption down

With summer vacation drawing to a close, many parents are eager to pop a bottle of bubbly in celebration.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. **File (Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Imperial dreams

Historically, the West has faced an existential threat from both the Persian and Russian empires. The Persian Empire was fueled by the expansionist dreams of Darius and Xerxes, foiled only by the heroism of the Greeks, led by men like Themistocles.

Related Articles

Illustration on the furtherance of human rights by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tracking freedom's enemies

If I were to ask an intelligent person like you what happened in the 20th century, or the 19th or the 18th, you could probably sum up the most significant developments. But if I asked you what is happening in the 21st century, how would you reply?

Tracing the rich history of the Olympics

David Goldblatt examines the stories, surprises, struggles and successes in "The Games: A Global History of the Olympics." With dashes of history, politics, ethnicity and popular culture, the well-respected sportswriter-author shows us how far the Olympics have come, and what the games' future might hold.

The first air conditioning unit used to cool the U.S. House of Representatives      The Washington Times

A legacy of hot air

This is the time of year that tries men's souls in the District of Columbia -- when the summer patriot hopes that the town's heat wave won't spring eternal. But it appears that August will set more records for the capital city.

Illustration on the need for Hillary to rest by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pause the campaign, Hillary needs a rest

This political campaign has already become too long and too arduous for the campaigners and the voters alike. Dare I say it? Politics as practiced in America is in danger of becoming a health hazard.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, addresses a gathering at a campaign rally Monday, Aug. 15, 2016, in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Democrats' barriers to free speech

Democrats' grand plan for this election year doesn't seem to include free speech. The group that drafted the Democratic Party platform recently called for the Justice Department to prosecute energy companies that don't see eye-to-eye with Democrats on climate change.

Trump a tax genius?

After releasing her tax returns and saying that she and her husband had paid a 30-percent tax rate, Hillary Clinton tweeted, "Here's a pretty incredible fact: There is a nonzero chance that Donald Trump isn't paying *any* taxes."

Marine's discharge an outrage

It is fortunate that the Marine Corps was able to recognize Cpl. Monifa Sterling's workstation placards for what they actually were: a threat to discipline and good order ("Military court upholds Marine's bad conduct discharge over Bible verses," Web, Aug. 11). Cpl. Sterling could not be permitted to express her faith in such a blatant manner, and was apparently deemed unworthy of a modicum of common decency and consideration on the part of her supervisor.

Hundreds of civilians flee villages outside Mosul the day after Iraqi Kurdish forces launch an operation east of Islamic State-held Mosul on Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. The Kurdish forces known as the Peshmerga say they have retaken 12 villages in the operation in an effort to encircle the city. (AP Photo/Susannah George)

ISIS comes closer

The adage "the best defense is a good offense" is an old one and usually an accurate one. It's frequently invoked by sportswriters on the football beat, but it can apply to warfare, too. President Obama, a keen sports fan, nevertheless failed to understand this and now America's enemies are coming. Whether they can be stopped before they inflict further serious damage is a question we'll all see answered.

FILE - In this July 22, 2016, file photo, a hostess prepares for the G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting in Chengdu, in southwestern China's Sichuan province. China will propose a joint initiative to revive weak global growth at next month's meeting of leaders of Group of 20 major economies amid rising protectionist sentiment in the United States and Europe, officials said Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, Pool, File)

Bringing back 'stolen' jobs

The international economy is so interlocked that creating jobs in one national economy creates jobs in another national economy. That's why it's misleading to talk of the Chinese and other low-wage countries having "stolen" American jobs. It's not "just that simple."

How to Make Ethanol Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Two contending issues, both 'green'

It's easy to say that we can't put a price tag on a clean environment. But beyond this noble sentiment is a simple reality that radical "greens" prefer to ignore: Like any other area of policy, nurturing the world around us involves choices based on time, effort and, yes, money.

Charismatic, but egotistical and deceitful, too

Asked in March 1945 to name the greatest U.S. Army general of the war, 45 percent of the respondents named Douglas MacArthur -- far surpassing Dwight Eisenhower and Omar Bradley.

FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014, file photo, a woman pays for merchandise at a Kohl's department store in Sherwood, Ark. A recent poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that two-thirds of Americans would have difficulty coming up with the money to cover a $1,000 emergency. But having a modest, immediately accessible emergency fund is critical to financial well-being. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)

Making welfare reform work

If anyone ever wonders why conservatives are skeptical of government programs, they should consider the War on Poverty. There are other examples, of course, but public welfare is a particularly apt one as we mark the 20th anniversary of the 1996 reform.

Illustration on the relationship of Putin and Erdogan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Putin marches on

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's recent meeting with Vladimir Putin in Moscow demonstrated clearly America's deteriorating position in both Europe and the Middle East.

Illustration on Mexican drug cartels' personnel needs and the recent release of thousands of drug offenders from U.S. federal prisons by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A boon for the drug cartels

The Mexican drug traffickers and their Chinese suppliers have a personnel problem.

Benefits of Free Trade Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for free trade

Do you support free trade? Many business people, politicians and workers say they are in favor of free trade, "but with conditions" -- because they can see and feel the job losses but not the job and income gains.

Illustration on past Liberal policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What the past can teach us

While we shouldn't live in the past, we can certainly learn from it. We are not the first humans to walk the Earth, and yet too many, especially the young, suffer from the conceit that history is just a boring subject in school.

FBI Director James B. Comey. (Associated Press)

Life is just fairer to some than to others

- The Washington Times

Millions of Americans, mostly Democrats but a few sourball Republicans, tell pollsters and anyone who doesn't want to listen that they're preparing themselves to ignore the stink and shame of Hillary Clinton when they vote in November. They're advised here to prepare themselves for a protracted season of malaise and buyer's remorse.

Union Working Against Teachers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When unions march lockstep with Democrats

Summer is winding down, and teachers are readying their lessons for the upcoming school year. But America's largest labor union -- the National Education Association (NEA) -- is hatching another plan: to use teachers' union dues to elect Hillary Clinton.