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Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A lesson from Yemen

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

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'Satellite solidarity' with sorely lacking

White House press secretary Josh Earnest has done his best to deal with the decision by someone in the White House that President Obama not go to Paris. Mr. Earnest has pointed out the president's unwavering support for France and the French people. Obama called French President Francois Hollande on the day of the Charlie Hebdo attacks to express his outrage. He offered all U.S. assistance in dealing with the situation. He even dropped by the French embassy to sign the condolence book.

Illustration on deploying U. S. Aircraft carriers to the Mediterranean Sea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington times

A better way to patrol the Middle East

With all the core elements of Iran's nuclear weapons program now guaranteed and secured by the one-sided concessions made by the United States and agreed to by the other P5 plus 1 negotiators in the 2013 interim agreement, Iran is on track to achieve a deliverable nuclear weapons capability.

Securing the border first is a sound idea: This fence marks the U.S.-Mexico border at El Calaboz, Texas. (Associated press)

Stopping jihad in America

The terrorist attacks on France are a reminder that the broken U.S. immigration system isn't just about saving American jobs, but keeping out terrorists who are itching to make similar attacks in America. In the wake of the Paris attacks that killed 17 men and women last week, security officials have warned that the United States is a target for mayhem, too. President Obama's relentless determination to open the nation's borders to just about everyone makes it considerably easier for the Islamic jihadis to prepare a strike. We shouldn't need a violent episode here to remind everyone that a nation that won't control its border is no nation at all.

President Barack Obama speaks at Pellissippi State Community College, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015, in Knoxville, Tenn., about new initiatives to help more Americans go to college and get the skills they need to succeed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Obama's bogus community college giveaway

President Obama can't resist the temptation to gin up new entitlements that chase votes but make problems worse—free tuition at community colleges would be no exception.

 (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Flunking Econ 101

Julia lives. Everybody is trying to forget Julia, President Obama's campaign cartoon figure from his 2012 re-election campaign. "The Life of Julia" touted the advantages of cradle-to-grave federal munificence, from universal pre-kindergarten classes for toddlers to Obamacare for everybody. "Julia" might have been called a celebration of womb-to-tomb munificence, except that a shower of contraceptives and abortions under Obamacare would mean that prospective descendants of Julia would never make it out of the womb.

Dangers of 'free' college

Once the feds pay the bill for publicly funded community colleges, they will determine which education plans constitute meaningful contributions to society ("Obama proposes publicly funded community colleges for all," Web, Jan. 9). We will then have a situation similar to the rationing of health care we are seeing under Obamacare.

The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) transits the Gulf of Aden. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Abe McNatt/Released)

Keeping the Navy matchless

Sometimes it is hard to believe how quickly time flies by. That statement is even truer in the life of modern weapons systems. As I stood in the heat of the day on July 4, 1991, little did I know that 24 years later I would so vividly recall the words, "Man the ship," as they rang out over the announcing system to bring USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) to life.

The wanting last of Bellow

For any writer, having his oeuvre collected in volumes by Library of America is in itself an accolade, a sign of his place in the literature of his nation. Saul Bellow (1915-2005) was not short on acknowledgments of his stature as a writer, winning just about every literary prize going, including the Nobel in 1976.

The Embassy of FInland in the nation's capital has won a coveted Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification for it site design and practices. The embassy interior is shown here.  (Embassy of FInland)

A first: The green-minded Embassy of Finland wins a coveted LEED platinum certification

- The Washington Times

On-site composting, high efficiency water faucets, low energy consumption, bikes for staffers and no plastic cups on the premises - these are just a few measures one green-minded embassy has taken. And to much acclaim. The Embassy of Finland in the nation's capital has been awarded the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification - and the first embassy in the U.S. to win the ultimate designation. There's history. In previous years, the striking and beautifully designed diplomatic site has won a "green," then a "gold" designation. Such efforts can only enhance the nation's image on these shores and elsewhere.

Marine Le Pen      Associated Press photograph

The worm in Charlie’s apple

An atrocity is a terrible way to increase a magazine's circulation, but that's how Charlie Hebdo got its current run of 3 million copies or more, up from 65,000. Satire, once regarded on Broadway as "what closed on Saturday night," now sells, and this week in Paris it might sell out.

Has U.S. forgotten God?

As we will soon begin to view political campaigns for next year's national election, it might be valuable to consult our history. It was James Madison, "father of the Constitution," who invoked the following: "We have staked the whole future of all our political institutions upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves, according to the Ten Commandments of God."

Illustration on French "free speech" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What freedom of speech?

The photos of 40 of the world's government leaders marching arm-in-arm along a Paris boulevard on Sunday with the president of the United States not among them was a provocative image that has fomented much debate. The march was, of course, in direct response to the murderous attacks on workers at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo by a pair of brothers named Kouachi, and on shoppers at a Paris kosher supermarket by one of the brothers' comrades.