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A workable alternative to synthetic soldiers

- The Washington Times

The Obama administration’s big idea, proudly disclosed Thursday that “transgender individuals” — not to be confused with “men” and “women” — can now serve openly in the U.S. military services. This ends one of the last bans on service in the nation’s armed forces and opens a new chapter of men at arms. HMS Pinafore goes to war.

Trained Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What America can learn from Israel

Donald Trump, backtracking on an earlier statement about how guns in the Pulse nightclub in Orlando might have saved lives, said a club security guard ready with a pistol would’ve been “a beautiful thing.”

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump will gather with friends such as Sarah Palin and foes such as Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska this weekend at the Western Conservative Summit, a rehearsal of sorts for the party's national convention. (Associated Press)

No Trump trade retreat

Donald Trump is peddling a long-held, left-wing, labor union trade policy that will hike consumer prices, kill jobs and further weaken our economy.

Illustration on Iran's empty condemnation of terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Iran’s empty condemnation of terrorism

About two days after an Orlando gunman carried out the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the Iranian foreign ministry issued a statement purporting to decry the incident. Speaking via the state-run IRNA, a spokesperson said the Iranian regime “condemns” the attack “based on its principled policy of condemning terrorism and its strong will to seriously confront this evil phenomenon.”

Illustration on prospects for the post-EU British economy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Britain’s economy, post-Brexit

This is no time to sell the United Kingdom short. Its economic and political institutions remain among the strongest in the world and should afford it considerable opportunity to negotiate new arrangements with the European Union.

Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama, left, welcomes the Albanian national soccer squad arriving in Tirana after failing to qualify to the next round at the EURO 2016 European Championship, Thursday, June 23, 2016.(AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)

An albatross in Albania?

In what is increasingly reminiscent of a John Le Carre novel, it seems that with each passing month there is a new chapter in a seemingly unending series of revelations of political intrigue and drama that are overwhelming the Republic of Albania.

Illustration on the Brexit outcome's effects on uncontrolled migration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rule Britannia

Whether you think the United Kingdom exiting the European Union is cause for alarm or celebration, you have to concede this: Britons engaged in an open, lively and mostly peaceful debate, they turned out in droves, they cast their votes freely and fairly and, by so doing, expressed their will and determined their future. That’s called democracy. Is there a preferable alternative?

Term Limits for Congress Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The common sense of term limits

As our first president, George Washington knew that everything he did set a pattern for those who would follow. He served two terms in office, then stepped down. He declined all efforts to get him to stay.

Illustration on a proposal to create boards of directors to oversee Executive branch departments by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A remedy for overregulation

If the 2016 presidential election has proved anything so far, it’s that millions of Americans know something is seriously wrong in Washington and they want it fixed. They’re right.

Jihad Magazines Collage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The original jihadists

They wave a menacing black banner, behead American hostages in slickly produced videos, entice hardened jihadis and thrill-seeking wannabes alike to their ranks, bust a border to establish a state and claim provinces from West Africa to Southeast Asia.

Illustration on Joyful Noise's fundraising for the Sanders campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Joyful Noise unites ‘citizens for Sanders’

Throughout this year’s presidential primary, Sen. Bernie Sanders made support for tougher campaign finance laws a cornerstone of his (now presumably concluding) campaign. His website railed against the “political campaign finance system” as “corrupt,” and “the disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision” as “hing[ing] on the absurd notion that money is speech, [and] corporations are people.”

Illustration on the need to identify radical Islamic's impact on homosexuality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s duty after Orlando

Americans witnessed evil once again as a radical Islamic gunman — who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State’s caliph — recently killed or wounded 102 people while they were enjoying “Latin Night” in a popular gay night club in Orlando. It was the deadliest attack on the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender (LBGT) community in American history.

Related Articles

Much change, no hope

In 2008 I contributed $5,002 to 55 different charities. In 2015 I contributed $1,775 to 25 different charities. In seven years even my contributions to my local parish were cut almost in half. That's a 64.5-percent reduction in overall charitable giving.

GOP, not Trump, real problem

It's easy to say that Donald Trump is an obnoxious, egomaniacal buffoon, but the real story might be a little subtler and a little more complex (not that it makes him any more desirable as president).

Syrian President Bashar Assad listens to  Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu during their talks in Damascus, Syria, Saturday, June 18, 2016. Russia's defense minister visited Syria on Saturday to meet the country's leader and inspect the Russian air base there, a high-profile trip intended to underline Moscow's role in the region. (Vadim Savitsky/ Russian Defense Ministry Press Service pool photo via AP)

A misplaced protest in Syria

Fifty-one career diplomats have signed a protest to the Secretary of State and President Obama condemning U.S. policy, or lack of a good one, in Syria. Their point, that the United States should do everything it can to unseat the barbarous regime of Bashar Assad, is well taken — everywhere but at the White House.

Illustration on the need for Syrian safe zones by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reconsidering safe zones in Syria

The situation in Syria remains bleak, with no end in sight to its five-year civil war. President Bashar Assad's forces and their Russian and Iranian backers continue to lay waste to rebel-held territory, leaving the rebels with shrinking leverage to pressure the regime into a lasting political settlement.

Commanders Worth More Than Lawyers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Commanders hold the key to military justice

Some lawmakers seek to remove senior commanders from decisions to refer cases for prosecution. They would place that power with a senior military attorney in another organization, separate from the victim or the accused. Before making such a change, proponents should consider not only recent changes, but also how the proposed changes would affect the combat readiness of our armed forces.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Castaway's War: One Man's Battle Against Imperial Japan'

Of all the combat veterans I have encountered in almost half a century of writing, not a single person has claimed the accolade "hero," regardless of the number of ribbons he wears. I recall vividly the reaction of a much-decorated veteran of the Korean War when I suggested his actions earned him such a designation.

Gosnell in Prison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Kermit Gosnell and the suffering abortion industry

Abortionist and convicted murderer Kermit Gosnell calls himself an "impractical man." Speaking from his prison cell, where he sits for killing a patient and three born-alive babies, he told one of the documentary filmmakers of "3801 Lancaster: American Tragedy": "Practical man changes to live within his society.

Illustration on Clinton money by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Donald Trump has learned

It has now been a year since Donald Trump formally became a politician and declared his candidacy for the nation's highest office. Actually, it has been a little over a year, because he was considering it for months before he declared from Trump Tower on June 16, 2015. What has he learned?

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks about the economy at Fort Hayes Vocational School Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Factors that elected Bill could now defeat Hillary

Hillary Clinton knows better than anyone the economy's weakness and its political danger. The reason George H.W. Bush lost a close race to a political outsider with glaring liabilities 24 years ago was public perception that the economy was weak.

In this June 18, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the Treasure Island hotel and casino in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Campaign turnaround for Trump?

Real estate tycoon Donald Trump, who has ignited a political fire storm in the Republican Party, has fired his presidential campaign manager, saying he will change his style for the general election.

Illustration on ineffectual Obama administration strategies against ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama's disintegrating strategy

Throughout his presidency, Barack Obama has maintained his willful ignorance of the fact that weakness against terrorists abroad, coupled with weakness against them at home, add up to more than the sum of their parts. To defeat terrorists, we need to have policies at home and strategies abroad that are integrated and support each other.

Boris Johnson. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

It's crunch time in Old Blighty

- The Washington Times

This is do-or-die week in Old Blighty. Our British cousins will decide Thursday whether to reclaim their birthright, voting to leave the European Union and the Germans, French and an assorted gang of easy riders, and reclaim their status as a world-power capable of sitting on its own bottom.

Stop Israeli Boycotts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No boycotts against Israel

Last Sunday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York signed Executive Order No. 157, directing state entities to divest all public funds supporting the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against Israel.

French President Francois Hollande arrives in the stands prior to the Euro 2016 Group A soccer match between France and Albania at the Velodrome stadium in Marseille, France, Wednesday, June 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

A cheer, please, for France

These are not happy times for Europe. Angela Merkel has invited in more house guests than Germany can accommodate, the British are talking about leaving the European Union (though Britain has never regarded itself as part of continental Europe), and la belle France is the principal target for Muslim terrorists. Paris has suffered two bloody attacks within the past 18 months.

President Barack Obama walks off stage after speaking at the SelectUSA Investment Summit in Washington, Monday, June 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Obama's altered reality

It's not the crime, but the cover-up. This is the first rule that every administration, Democrat and Republican, liberal and conservative, learns, and usually the hard way. Some crimes are more serious than others, but a little crime, like a little acorn, can grow into a mighty scandal or a mighty oak.