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George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We’ve heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Royhingya refugees from Myanmar receiving food from Bangladeshi aid workers          Associated Press photo

A refugee emergency and the terrorism it breeds

Bangladesh has been a haven for the Rohingya people since they began fleeing unprovoked oppression in their home state of Rakhine on Myanmar’s western shore, bordering Bangladesh, in 2015. Denied citizenship in their own country, the Rohingya have been in conflict not only with the other citizens of Rakhine but also with the government of Myanmar, which considers many of them to be anti-government insurgents. The United Nations describes the Rohingya as one of the world’s most persecuted people.

Trump's Door and Wall Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MAGA and DACA

What does it mean to ‘Make America Great Again’? That’s a seemingly simple question with no simple answer, but an important part of it is certainly fixing our broken systems.

Illustration on possible solutions to the North Korea situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump, the statesman, at the U.N.

President Trump is right. His speech at the United Nations was his third act of Reagan-like statesmanship, after the historically accurate, morally rooted and inspirational speeches in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Warsaw, Poland. This time, he pointedly spoke for those who cannot speak in Iran, North Korea, Venezuela, and suppressed people around the world. It was a tour de force, and it’s hard to disagree with any word. Once again, Ronald Reagan would be nodding.

Illustration on Russia's attacks on Ukraine by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Taking Putin seriously

President Trump mentioned the word sovereignty 21 times in his address to the United Nations Tuesday, but said little about Russia’s efforts to seize parts of Ukraine, piece by piece, and threaten other neighboring states.

In this June 2, 2017, file photo, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Scott Pruitt, in fight for EPA life — literally

- The Washington Times

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has apparently generated so much controversy that radical green peeps are threatening him with near-regularity, to the point he’s now getting extra armed protection. Seriously, folks, some perspective, please. Are trees that important?

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Courage and Vision of Columbus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Good-bye, Columbus

With Columbus Day upon us leftist rage is approaching gale force. Blinded by their irrational hatred they denounce Columbus and the civilization he symbolized for every ill ever visited upon this hemisphere. They are domestic Taliban, whose goal is the cultural obliteration of our society.

A protester is silhouetted as he carries the United Nations flag during a rally against Nigerian President Buhari as pedestrians walk through federal plaza Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Jarring minds with facts, not fists

The economics of free speech have become quite strange. It took $600,000, a sea of police officers in riot gear and concrete barricades to ensure Berkeley didn’t devolve into anarchy and chaos when conservative political commentator Ben Shapiro came to town last week. Demonstrations outside remained mostly peaceful with only nine arrests. This, however, is a troubling sign in light of what comes next on Berkeley’s campus.

Illustration on John Dickinson     The Washington Times

Planting the seeds of American independence

This year marks the 250th anniversary of one of the most influential series of writings in American history: the first of John Dickinson’s Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, which appeared in 1767.

Then-first lady Barbara Bush and then-Missouri Gov. John Ashcroft attend a "Parents as Teachers" event in Florissant, Missouri, where Mrs. Bush reads to the children. (National Archives)

Reading is still fundamental, even amid hurricanes

- The Washington Times

Christian and Skyler were anxious. The 5-year-old Texas twins were set to enter kindergarten — until Hurricane Harvey ripped their world. Their school is among five north of Corpus Christi that remain shuttered, having lost heating and air conditioning systems, roofs, electrical systems and much of what ordinarily defines a schoolhouse, including children, teachers and books.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters about the Graham-Cassidy health care bill during a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump takes leadership reins, pushes top items of agenda

First, President Trump marshalled the full attention and focus of the federal government in response to hurricanes Harvey and Irma, winning broad praise for the federal government’s response. Criticism has not come, despite the size and scope of the storms and the harsh partisan atmosphere.

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Illustration on zero sum approaches to tax reform and regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Toward real tax reform

The evening news and front pages are dominated by natural disasters. But our federal tax code is an unnatural disaster strangling America with long-term stagnation. To restore booming growth, America needs tax reform as proposed by President Trump and Republican Congressional leaders, who are virtually "singing off the same sheet."

Illustration on the potential for Trump's deal making by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The deals Trump must make

By dealing with Democrats to raise the debt ceiling and fund the government through December, President Trump has opened a window for bargains on taxes and infrastructure that could be attractive to both the administration and minority party in Congress.

Illustration on remedies for a sluggish recovery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shaping the Trump economy

America's middle-class incomes shot up by 3.2 percent last year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, after a decade marked by the Great Recession, weak economic growth and widespread unemployment.

Illustration on Chuck Schumer's position on oil by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Chuck Schumer is running on fumes

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer evidently hasn't visited a gas station this year. If he had, he'd realize that his recent diatribe against the oil industry is based on a complete fiction.

Rep. Nancy Pelosi. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The furtive romance at the White House

- The Washington Times

Summer's almost gone, but romance is still in the air over Pennsylvania Avenue. Nancy Pelosi's dancing the night away with the devil at the White House, and Chuck Schumer, the chaperone, is making himself right at home on Donald Trump's sofa. That's Mitch McConnell sitting off to the side by himself, trying to figure out whether to look chagrined or cheery. Or at least not as superfluous as he feels.

Democratic leaders fraudulent

Tammy Bruce's recent piece, "Why Democrats fear voter fraud investigations" (Web, Sept. 13), illuminates the real motive behind Democratic resistance to investigations into voter fraud. Vowing to do this or that ad nauseam, Democrats now have the Presidential Advisory Commission in their crosshairs. Knowing full well that voter fraud exists and that it demonstrably benefits vote tabulations for Democratic candidates essentially makes the party leadership accessories to fraud.

Status quo good for politicians

In simple terms, here is the reason nothing ever gets done with politicians: Every politician runs for office on a platform of fixing all that's wrong, but if they fix those problems, what will they have to run on the next time?

New Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell, center, gets up after signing paperwork moments after taking the oath of office for mayor Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017, in Seattle. Harrell, who was City Council president, assumed the temporary position following the resignation of Mayor Ed Murray. Murray resigned after it was reported that a fifth man, one of his cousins, had accused Murray of molesting him decades ago. Murray has vehemently denied all of the accusations against him and had already decided not to seek re-election. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

EDITORIAL: Racial injustice in Seattle

We can't ever be too sensitive about racial insensitivity, and kudos today to Larry Gossett, a member of the city council of Seattle, which is one of the most sensitive cities anywhere. Mr. Gossett is not necessarily a fan of the stinky stuff you collect on the bottom of your shoe when you step in something a dog has left on the sidewalk, but he urges caution -- and sensitivity -- about how it's cleaned up.

FILE - In this Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally, in Berkeley, Calif. Police in the city of Berkeley can use pepper spray on violent demonstrators after the City Council voted Tuesday, Sept. 12, to allow police to use pepper spray to repel attacks on officers and others during the kind of violent protests that have rocked the city this year. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)

The inconvenience of free speech

Free speech can be so inconvenient. A growing number of Democrats like the First Amendment's guarantee of the right to free speech and assembly, but only for themselves and for those who agree with them. This is a fundamental misunderstanding of the First Amendment, which does not guarantee pleasing, nice, or even responsible speech, but free speech -- even odious speech.

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed-door meeting in Washington. A grand jury used by Mueller has heard secret testimony from a Russian-American lobbyist who attended a June 2016 meeting with President Donald Trump's eldest son, The Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

For a real Russia collusion story, follow a different trail

With Special Counsel Robert Mueller now moving into tax and money laundering issues, the Russian-Trump collusion theory having proven a dry hole, it would make sense that Congress take a look at real collusion by the Russians and American politicians over the last decade, if the current hysteria over the issue is sincere.

President Donald Trump takes a question from a member of the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, after meeting with people impacted by Hurricane Irma in Florida. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Trump delivers to voters, even if they don't like it

- The Washington Times

Thrice now President Trump has struck a dirty deal with devious Democrats, thwarting the good governance of fellow Republicans and betraying the alliance of voters who sent him to the White House where they hoped he would just behave like a good, proper professional Republican.

A pro-Trump supporter tries to get his hat back in Portland, Ore., on September 10, 2017, after he was confronted by antifascist protesters gathering against a rally by right-aligned Patriot Prayer supporters led by Joey Gibson. Only a few Patriot Prayer members showed up and police used pepper spray after protesters pushed down a barrier separating the groups. (Photo by Alex Milan Tracy)(Sipa via AP Images)

Antifa: Yes, the violence is necessary

- The Washington Times

Antifa thugs say their violence is necessary because their goals are aimed at fighting "Nazi" ideologies, and the ends therefore justify the means. The ends justify the means -- such a powerful persuader.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (right) was able to "speak New York" to President Trump, paving the way for an agreement last week to increase government borrowing and speed relief money to the hurricane victims, according to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who attended the meetings. (Associated Press/File)

Trump, Pelosi, Schumer DACA deal no cause for alarm -- yet

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump reportedly has struck a DACA deal with Sen. Chuck Schumer and Rep. Nancy Pelosi. And already, the left is crowing, the right is gasping, and the media is spinning madly. But let's lower the eyebrows for a moment and take a breath. This is hardly cause for conservative alarm.

Black Lives Matter protesters cover a statue of Thomas Jefferson with a tarp during a rally in front of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia on Tuesday. (Photo by Zack Wajsgras/The [Charlottesville, Va.] Daily Progress)

Jefferson under siege: Next up -- the Declaration of Independence

- The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter protesters gathered 'round the Thomas Jefferson statue that stands in front of the rotunda at the University of Virginia and shrouded the Founding Father's face, demanding "justice" as they draped a sign that read, "Black Lives Matter -- F--k White Supremacy" over the monument base. Mark my words: First Robert E. Lee. Then Jefferson. Next up will be the Declaration of Independence and America's founding and governing documents.

Illustration on Trump's recent deal with congressional Democrats by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's option play

What just happened? President Trump cut a deal with Democrats to pay for hurricane damage relief and raise the debt ceiling without getting anything in return, except the temporary avoidance of a government shutdown. How to describe this? Was it a sellout, or a pragmatic act?