Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Milo Yiannopoulos      Associated Press photo

An expensive lesson for conservatives

- The Washington Times

The more the culture bounds out of control, the more the wary have to take care with the company they keep. This applies to media that will print anything in pursuit of “clicks” and “hits,” and to well-meaning organizations about whom they invite to tutor their true believers.

No deal for a two-state solution

“The president is committed to peace. That’s as far as I want to go on that,” said President Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer, on Feb. 3 in answer to a reporter’s inquiry regarding the Trump administration’s position on the “two-state solution” for peace between the Palestinians and Israelis. Will Mr. Trump push the two-state paradigm, like George W. Bush and Barack Obama before him, or will the White House realize that this idea is a dangerous fantasy like the irrational Iran nuclear deal?

Retirement Planning Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing for the long term

Ordinary investors can’t be blamed for hesitancy about stocks with market indexes trading near record levels and President Trump’s radical, sometimes quixotic ideas creating so much uncertainty. Yet patience and a diversified portfolio remain the best long-term investment strategy.

FILE - This 2015 file photo provided by the Bloomington Normal Airport Authority shows a damaged wing of a Cirrus SR22 single-engine plane at the Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. Once seen as a luxury of the corporate world, private planes are becoming increasingly common at U.S. colleges and universities as schools try to attract athletes, raise money and reward coaches with jet-set vacations. Iowa State University President Steven Leath, a pilot, acknowledged last year that he used a school plane for trips that mixed personal and university business, a practice that came to light after he damaged the aircraft in a hard landing. (Bloomington Normal Airport Authority via AP, File)

TripAdvisor’s Stockholm Syndrome

Despite producing huge amounts of value for society, businesses are among the most vilified institutions in America.

Illustration on the drawbacks of Obamacare risk pools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to lower Obamacare premiums

The Affordable Care Act is in a “death spiral,” warns Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini. Premiums have doubled since the end of 2013, and yet insurers are rapidly exiting the individual market, leaving consumers in many parts of the nation at risk of having no coverage.

Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It’s been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council — an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies — President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America’s anti-growth tax system.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump’s hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can’t agree on the replacement “plan.”

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump’s meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California’s mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump’s presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration’s top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

Related Articles

Washington faced longer odds

In terms of historical contrast, the division and opposition Donald Trump faces as president hardly measure up to the challenges George Washington faced during and even after the War of Independence. The issue of independence from Britain was by no means unanimously supported, and it proved highly divisive in all 13 of the original states. Indeed, 80,000 loyalists who rejected independence left the fledgling country during or after the war. Patriot communities went about forcing people on pain of punishment and confiscation of property to swear allegiance to the United States.

Left, not Trump supporters, violent

Over the past year the media has incessantly promoted the idea that conservatives (and more specifically "Trump supporters") have been inciting violence and hate across the country. The truth is precisely the opposite. Examining the violent crimes that have taken place in the past year reveals that the Democratic Party is responsible for inciting the violence, and that this pattern of oppression through violence is repeated throughout history as far back as the Civil War.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, center, holds a meeting with the heads of federal law enforcement components at the Department of Justice in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. FBI Director James Comey sits at left and Acting Deputy Attorney General Dana Boente is at right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool)

The rant that failed

The Democrats in the U.S. Senate threw everything they could find at Jeff Sessions, including an occasional kitchen sink, but it was not enough. Rant as they might, the mild-mannered senator from Alabama, was nevertheless confirmed by a vote of 52 to 47. One Democrat, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, broke from the mob to vote to confirm him.

In this Feb. 1, 2017 photo, Anjali Lama, a transgender model from Nepal, holds a scarf up with another model as they wait to walk the ramp during Lakme Fashion week in Mumbai, India. Growing up as the fifth son in a poor farming family in rural Nepal the dream to be a fashion model came late in life. First came a long, painful struggle to accept that he felt deeply female. It was a chance encounter with a group of transgender women that turned Lama's life around by putting her in touch with the Blue Diamond Society, an advocacy group for Nepal's LGBT community. In 2005 she came out to her friends and family as a transgender woman. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

Aborted bliss in the boudoir

The lot of a transgendered wife is not always a happy one, no matter how many genders and marriages she terminates with extreme prejudice. A cheatin' heart can hurt in the unlikeliest places.

Illustration on the results of Congressional overcomplexity on tax reform by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Changing the tax code

When it comes to changing our tax code, Washington should trust the free-enterprise system. The problem is too many politicians writing tax policy have never worked in the real world.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, in this Jan. 31, 2017, file photo. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The painful education of Neil Gorsuch

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch doesn't know much about politics and how the political class in Washington works, and that's a good thing. Politics and the law make unnatural bedfellows, and the progeny of such beds is often unnatural.

Tragedy of American Drugs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What the national drug crisis requires

Extraordinary times we live in -- not least because supposedly responsible people are promoting drug abuse, which everyone knows cascades into addiction, drug-crime, overdoses -- that are killing us. So what gives? No one wants to stand up and take responsibility for saying -- stop this madness, and fix the crisis. America's greatness depends on a lot of things -- and stopping the rolling, expansive, destructive drug crisis is one.

A 1950s cattle ranch and roiling politics

April Smith's "Home Sweet Home" is based on a true story of an East Coast family that moved to the West to become cattle ranchers in the 1950s.

Illustration on Trump's tweeting by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Donald Trump's tweets

President Trump faces a lot of trouble at home and abroad, but you would never know it from the complaints he regularly fires off in his combative, news-making tweets and other remarks.

Yes to Medicaid block grants

The disability community is apoplectic about Health and Human Services Secretary-designate Rep. Tom Price's commitment to Medicaid block grants. Yet block granting was somewhat successful under President Reagan, and President Trump can improve it.

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, then-President-elect Donald Trump walks Labor Secretary-designate Andrew Puzder from Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Puzder has proposed avoiding conflicts of interest by resigning as CEO of his fast food empire, selling off hundreds of holdings and recusing himself from government decisions in which he has a financial interest, according to his ethics filings with the government. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Plugging the terror gaps

President Trump hit the courthouse wall trying to prevent immigrants from seven terror-exporting nations from entering the United States until they can be properly vetted. This enables radical Islamic saboteurs to sneak past inefficient U.S. screening procedures like wolves among innocent sheep. Until the president's new vetting plans are in place, Congress must seek alternative measures to expel bad actors once discovered. Republican congressmen, fortunately, are working on it.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos smiles while greeting employees after addressing the department staff at the Department of Education on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017 in Washington. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Betsy DeVos laughs last

Betsy DeVos was what bomber pilots call "a target of opportunity," selected not from a carefully compiled list of strategic targets, but a target that a pilot with a few bombs left over from the day's work is free to drop if he sees something inviting. Chuck Schumer, comfortable in his safe place, knew he had to blow up somebody. His friends on the left were thirsty for scalps and blood.

Illustration on prescription drug advertising by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Just say no to drug ads on TV

It's been 20 years since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) permitted the advertising of prescription drugs on television. It was a dumb decision in 1997, and it's dumber after two decades, with just one other nation, New Zealand, in agreement.

FILE- In this Feb. 1, 2017 file photo, ACLU of Oregon legal director Mat dos Santos speaks at a news conference in Portland to announce a federal lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Portland against President Donald Trump's executive immigration order. President Trump's immigration order has had a positive effect of the ACLU's bottom line. Tens of millions of dollars are pouring into the ACLU and hundreds of thousands of people are signing on as members so quickly that the group's 1,150 employees can't keep track. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)

Skewing the polls on immigration

A new year, a new Congress, and a new presidential administration but the same perennial debate about illegal immigration. And with it comes countless polls that suggest solutions to the problem.

President Donald Trump speaks in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. The Associated Press has learned that another nonprofit organization is rejecting federal grant money to fight against violent extremism under President Donald Trump's administration. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Major media remain in denial

Since Donald Trump's election, the major media have been trying to figure out what they did wrong, given their fawning coverage of Hillary Clinton and their anti-Trump stories. Didn't they help twice elect Barack Obama? Why didn't the formula work this time?

Ushering In the End of Obamacare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ubering past Obamacare

In 2009, when President Obama first took on health care reform, three major issues in the existing system were almost universally agreed upon: