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FILE - In this March 22, 2014, file photo, former President Bill Clinton, left, listens as former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a student conference for the Clinton Global Initiative University at Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz. Clinton had long ago moved on from her bruising defeat in her 2008 presidential run. Clinton questioned whether the country was willing to give her family the White House for the third time. A less talked about concern was health, both hers and her husbands. The former president had undergone quadruple bypass surgery and had to make drastic lifestyle changes. Hillary Clinton would be 69 years old on Election Day, tying Ronald Reagan as the oldest American to be elected president if she won. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

The Clinton money-market account

- The Washington Times

If we can believe Hillary Clinton (and there’s no reason why anyone should), she and Bubba have gone from “dead broke” when they left the White House to accumulating riches that beggar Croesus, the ancient king of Lydia, and Midas, who was rich even before he started selling mufflers for Pontiacs and Chevys. Nevertheless, Hillary and Bubba are lining up now for seconds.

This image released by Vani Hari shows the food blogger among boxes of cereal in Charlotte, N.C. The former management consultant turned healthy-living activist has a best-selling book and an army of supporters. She deploys them regularly to move giants in the food industry via online petitions that, among other things, helped get Kraft Foods to give up artificial dyes in its macaroni and cheese. (Courtesy Vani Hari via AP)

The crusade of food bimbos

This week, Kraft Foods announced that it was changing the formulation of its famous macaroni and cheese. The company will remove food coloring after being the latest target of an online peasants-with-pitchforks campaign run by a blogger calling herself “The Food Babe.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, and Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., right,  head into the Senate Chamber on Cap[itol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 23, 2015, for the confirmation vote on the nomination of Loretta Lynch for Attorney General. Lynch won confirmation to serve as attorney general Thursday from a Senate that forced her to wait more than five months for the title and remained divided to the end.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Getting back to business

Anyone looking for signs that Barack Obama’s presidency is running out of gas got a glimmer of hope this week from his daily schedule.

Illustration on Holder's contempt for justice while attorney general by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A calculated corruptor of justice

The first attorney general to be held in contempt of Congress has demonstrated shocking contempt for the law, and the ability to abuse and corrupt it for the political and social agenda of this president.

Eric Holder’s legacy

As Attorney General Eric Holder finally departs, he leaves behind a demoralized Justice Department that has been politicized to an unprecedented degree.

Illustration on Eric Holder's history of pardoning and releasing terrorists by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In agreement with America’s enemies

Only days before President Obama’s inauguration in Jan., 2009, I was invited to testify at Eric Holder’s confirmation hearing regarding his engineering, as deputy attorney general, the infamous 1999 Clinton clemency grants to 16 unrepentant members of the Puerto Rican terror group, Armed Forces of National Liberation (FALN).

Justice driven by race illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Eric Holder’s legacy

Alas, the Eric Holder era is over. But critics who think his departure means normalcy will return haven’t been paying attention. Mr. Holder was President Obama’s point man for fundamentally transforming the country, and he did his job well.

Illustration on the adverse impact of five years of Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shreds of doubt about Obamacare

Last week’s tax-filing deadline was a little bit more complicated than in the past, thanks to Obamacare.

Illustration on Hillary and money questions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary’s hurdles

Nearly four months into the two-year presidential election cycle, Hillary Clinton is running into deep trouble on several major political fronts.

Wind mills work atop the mesa near Sterling City, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Financing Climate Crisis, Inc.

The Obama administration is using climate change to “fundamentally transform” America. It plans to make the climate crisis industry so enormous that no one will be able to dismantle it, even as computer models and disaster claims totally lose credibility — and even if Republicans control Congress and the White House after 2016.

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton takes notes during a roundtable with educators and students at the Kirkwood Community College's Jones County Regional Center, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, in Monticello, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Adventures in the Scooby van

The silly season begins, when nobody follows presidential politics but the men and women of press and tube who are paid to do it. Still, on her first venture out of the shadows we learned several substantial things about "the new Hillary." She stopped at a Chipotle on the highway south of Toledo, en route to Iowa, and nobody recognized her behind a pair of dark sunglasses. She lunched on a chicken burrito bowl (with guacamole) and when she pulled into her hotel in Pittsburgh she was not hungry for further fine dining, and ordered "Scooby snacks" from the room-service menu. She's traveling in an "upgraded" Chevrolet van, "approved" by the Secret Service, christened "the Scooby van."

Illustration on reformation for Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The case for Islamic heresy

By now, you should be familiar with the name Ayaan Hirsi Ali. You should know at least this much about her: She is brilliant, beautiful, black and she has been banned near Boston.

When sanctions work and when they don’t

At a time when once again, for the umpteenth time in postwar America, the imposition of economic sanctions and just how they should be applied is a hot-button topic in Washington's corridors of power, here comes this provocative book which seems to be telling us that using them is at best almost useless and at worst actually counterproductive.

Republicans breaking campaign promises illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The wimpy GOP Congress

Last November, Americans sent a stern message to President Obama and the Democrats when they delivered Congress to the Republicans. That's because Republicans made a lot of promises to them in the last election. Those commitments were instrumental to their victory; they were actions Americans were demanding and Republicans were vowing to deliver.

End of the IRS tax code illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax code at sunset

We are officially off to the 2016 races. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz was the first official candidate to enter the GOP primary contest, followed by Sens. Rand Paul and Marco Rubio. Many more will undoubtedly follow.

Hold Clinton accountable

As an independent voter, I voted for Bill Clinton the second time around. Back then I spoke out against the Republicans for unmercifully going after him for his sexual involvement with a White House intern. From my perspective the attacks were a detriment to the seat of the presidency and made the entire country look like a soap opera in the eyes of the world. That brings me to former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Tsarnaev deserves death

That Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was found guilty on all 30 counts was a foregone conclusion, about as much of a surprise as a harsh northeastern winter ("Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty on all 30 counts in marathon bombing, faces death penalty," Web, April 8).

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's campaigning on a poor economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A ‘champion’ in search of a cause

Hillary Clinton's slick campaign video announcing her candidacy for the presidency is being shot down as "insultingly vapid," vacuous and utterly "without substance." This is coming from her liberal friends, not from her Republican critics.

Fidel Castro, 1962. Associated Press photograph

Reminding Obama about Cuba's history

Does anyone remember what it was that turned America hostile toward the tropical paradise of Cuba? Our president tells us that "we're caught in a time warp, going back to the 1950s and gunboat diplomacy, and 'Yanquis' and the Cold War." Yes, really, "gunboat diplomacy." That is how University of Chicago adjunct law professors talk about American foreign policy. And he adds, "Sometimes those controversies date back to before I was born." So, what got America so riled up over the Castro brothers and Cuban communists even before Barack Obama was born?

Illustration: Death tax by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

Kill the death tax

People shouldn't be taxed after they die and small family businesses shouldn't be taxed as they are passed down to the next generation.

Fading American history

The American people and boards of trustees must demand that students graduate college with knowledge of our past.

U.S. Army Pfc. Amy Alexanders carries a 103-pound barrel to a Bradley Fighting Vehicle during a physical demands study, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, in Ft. Stewart, Ga. The Army is conducting a study that will determine how all soldiers,  including women, for the first time, will be deemed fit to join its fighting units from infantry platoons to tank crews. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Women at war, and the enemy is us

- The Washington Times

There's so much to worry about that a conscientious citizen has to get up early to put in the 10 or 12 hours every day to cover it all — Hillary, the shortage of gay wedding cakes, the scarcity of gay pizza in Indiana, the deficiency of fresh-cut flowers for male brides in California, the horned devils who don't get no respect at the Iran-nuclear weapons talks in Switzerland. Now we have to worry about an excess of push-ups and pull-ups at Marine Corps training bases.

Abolish the IRS

Abolish the Internal Revenue Service? IRS Commissioner John Koskinen has said the government must have an IRS to collect the taxes to fund the government. Mr. Koskinen is right that no matter what kind of tax system we have, there needs to be a tax collection bureau. But those in favor of abolishing the present IRS are correct in that the United States certainly can get along perfectly well without the politicized, abusive and rights-trampling tax agency the IRS has become.

Hillary Rodham Clinton has attempted to allay the furor over her exclusive use of a private email account hosted on a private server in her home for conducting official business as secretary of state, a practice that may have violated federal open records laws. (Associated Press)

Hillary to the rescue

Hillary Rodham Clinton is not the inevitable president, but she was clearly the inevitable candidate. For the party, she's what's available, and she's a meal ticket for the clutch of retreads, has-beens and hangers-on from a checkered past, and now she wants to be the 67-year-old leader of a youth movement in a Democratic Party reeling and disillusioned in the wake of suffering blowouts in consecutive congressional elections. Her appeal, such as it is, is an unusual one: "I ain't much, but I'm all you've got."

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei took issues with key points on the framework of a nuclear deal including sanction relief and inspector access. (Associated Press)

Devilish nuclear details

The devil is often in the details of a deal, but the devil lies in the West's negotiators themselves as they attempt to make a deal with Iran. We have the word of Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, supreme leader of Iran, on that. He launched such a fusillade of verbal rockets against the Obama administration that the newly signed "framework" for a deal is scorched and blackened. If there was doubt that Iran would act in good faith in talks to shut down its nuclear weapons program, there is none now.

The 'new' Hillary Clinton

In the video announcing her presidential candidacy, Hillary Clinton says the economic deck "is still stacked in favor of those at the top."

Inhaler Saves Environmental Agenda Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rebranding the EPA’s clean air agenda

On Thursday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia will hear an important case, Murray Energy v. EPA, regarding what used to be the Environmental Protection Agency's global warming agenda. At issue are sweeping rules that amount to rewriting the Clean Air Act, an effort made necessary when Congress, via the proper democratic process, rejected turning that act into a global warming law for rationing our most abundant sources of energy.

What about Krajina Serbs?

It's all very well for Pope Francis to recognize the Ottoman genocide of Armenians, but what about Pius XII's silence regarding events across the Adriatic in wartime greater Croatia ("Pope recalls slaughter of Armenians in 'first genocide of the 20th century,'" Web, April 12)? Hundreds of thousands of civilian Serbs in Croatia and Bosnia were slaughtered by the Croatian Ustasha regime. Their only political ambition was to lie low given that Serbia proper was under brutal German occupation and their only crime was their national and religious identity.

Say no to 'Big Sister' Clinton

Maybe it's just the conservative in me, but when I heard Hillary Rodham Clinton say that "Everyday Americans need a champion, and I want to be that champion so you can do more than just get by — you can get ahead and stay ahead," my first thought was "Big government" ("Hillary Clinton announces 2016 bid, says she's running for 'everyday Americans,' April 12).