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Replacing patriotism with tribalism

Just after last week’s terrorist attack in Barcelona, a pro-Islamic State website posted video from the scene along with a message in Arabic saying, “Terror is filling the hearts of the Crusader in the Land of Andalusia.”

Trump's Baloney Detector Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s baloney detector annoys his critics

President Trump is in trouble again with his moral superiors. His problem, of course, is that he cannot throttle his baloney detector. Mr. Trump, it seems, at some point in life acquired a baloney detector that has usually served him well. It certainly served him well during his long years in business and during his brief time in politics. Now, however, it is problematic.

Incentive to Save Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Living with low interest rates

No matter what President Trump and Congress do about taxes and the like, low interest rates are becoming as certain as aging. That’s good news for young folks buying homes but tough on retirees who rely on CDs and bonds, and people over 55 realigning portfolios for retirement.

Iran Turkey Rivalry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran versus Turkey, again

News that Iran’s and Turkey’s governments reached an accord on Idlib, a Syrian town now the focus of American interests, brings relations between the two of the largest and most influential states in the Middle East momentarily out of the shadows.

Women have a tea as workers march towards Plaza de Mayo, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017. Thousands of union workers marched against the economic policies of President Mauricio Macri. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)

Time for organized labor to end forced dues

Given the heated rhetoric that surrounds the right to work, you might believe that the concept threatens the very existence of unions. However, as a former union president I can assure you that the ability to collect fees from people who don’t want to join the union is not only unnecessary, but that ultimately it undermines union officials’ legitimacy when speaking for voluntary members.

Illustration comparing Trump's administration with Clinton's by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Not the first wounded presidency

Liberals predicting Donald Trump’s impending political demise should recall one of their own: Bill Clinton. Mr. Clinton already plumbed President Trump’s worst-case scenarios and survived. Even congressional Republicans, for whom a “Clinton reprise” is a bigger threat, have less to fear than liberals would like to believe.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gives a speech at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, Thursday, May 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Madness! Even the giraffes have gone crazy

- The Washington Times

We owe Chicken Little an apology. Maybe the sky really is falling. Evidence is everywhere. Cries and whimpers suddenly grow deafening as the landscape is dusted with snowflakes, who imagine they’re unique and have in common with other snowflakes only an extremely low melting point.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Aug. 22, 2017.

The price-level dilemma

Is more inflation desirable? Those at the Federal Reserve seem to think so, and they have explicitly said their target is 2 percent, or about double the current level.

Illustration on removing Confederate statues and monuments by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Historical hysteria

We will learn even less from history if we wipe it clean, as some are trying to do by removing statues of Confederate leaders whose beliefs about slavery and race most, including me, find offensive. Conversation beats censorship.

Illustration on anarchist and totalitarian strains in the leftist Antifa movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old hatreds made new

Amid the chaos of Charlottesville, two specters from the previous century’s darkest hours have re-emerged. Alongside the well-publicized Nazi symbols on full display during the “Unite the Right” rally, so too were Communist hammers and sickles brandished by the opposing anti-fascist or “Antifa” protesters.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgetting McConnell’s greatest achievement

Mitch McConnell has been taking quite a beating from President Trump for failing to get a health care reform bill through the Senate, but even Mr. Trump has largely conceded that John McCain, alone blew up the majority leader’s painstakingly crafted compromise.

Presidential Courage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea and fear

At the heart of the Cold War, the ever-present nuclear threat had a profound effect on the American psyche. Children hiding under desks during air raid drills during the 1960s and 1970s had longer-term implications in terms of mental and physical health as studies in the 1980s revealed.

Union Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Union workers celebrate right-to-work laws

As summer temperatures continue in the 90s, August beachgoers aren’t the only ones feeling the heat. In Missouri, union employees are getting burned by efforts to block implementation of right-to-work.

Smoking Gun Flash Drive Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Rohrabacher-Assange meeting

- The Washington Times

California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher’s recent three-hour meeting with WikiLeaks head Julian Assange as reported earlier this week by The Hill may prove interesting in light of the allegations of several former high-ranking U.S. intelligence analysts that the Democratic National Committee was not hacked by the Russians or anyone else prior to last fall’s presidential election.

Related Articles

A wise word from the past

The Washington Times

"Experience is the teacher of all things," said Julius Caesar. The mighty ruler of Rome would know, but considering the ancient emperor's pointed encounter with sharp knives some things can be better learned through observation at a safe distance.

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Juche' or consequences

- The Washington Times

Its ideological commitment to nuclear weapons means North Korea will never disarm peacefully

Mr. Trump's LGBT tweets

The Washington Times

Lawyers are always looking for clients, but — until now — they have to find a client who has actually suffered harm before filing a lawsuit seeking damages for harm. But lawyers for five newly reconstructed women, each identified only as Jane Doe to preserve anonymity, have filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in Washington arguing that President Trump's tweet that he would bar transsexuals from serving in the military services violates both the Equal Protection clause of the 14th Amendment and the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution.

In this Sept. 24, 2011, file photo, George Soros speaks during a forum at the IMF/World Bank annual meetings in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

George Soros hitting U.S. Lobby Town hard

- The Washington Times

Billionaire George Soros, no doubt still reeling from the White House win of President Donald Trump, has decided to pour even more money into Congress, in hopes of furthering his progressive visions, a new report finds. And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why you shouldn't trust any member of Congress

Alissa Ellis chants while blocking an intersection during a rally Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Durham, N.C. Protesters toppled a nearly century-old statue of a Confederate soldier Monday at the rally against racism. The Durham protest was in response to a white nationalist rally held in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. (Casey Toth/The Herald-Sun via AP)

Confederate statues today, book burnings tomorrow

- The Washington Times

A crowd of ignorant protesters pulled down a bronze Confederate statue that stood before a county government building in Durham, North Carolina -- the angry national backlash to the Charlottesville brouhaha over the Robert E. Lee monument.

President Donald Trump walks across the tarmac to board Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. Trump is traveling back to Washington to sign an executive order at the White House and then later today travels to New York City. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump on Charlottesville: Danged if he does, danged if he doesn't

- The Washington Times

The immediate aftermath of the widely reported Charlottesville violence wasn't so much a media look at the issues, or the car-plowing suspect and victims, or even the demographics of the protesters -- that many came from out of state to stand strong against a small-town statue of Robert E. Lee -- as it was a cause to criticize President Donald Trump. But why all the angst against the president?

How a screenwriter faced his own 'High Noon'

Some books are interesting but not entertaining, while other books are just the opposite. But every once in a while a book comes along that it is both entertaining and interesting. Glenn Frankel's "High Noon" is such a book. It is the best nonfiction book I have read in a decade.

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Juche' or consequences

"Juche" -- the ideology of North Korea -- compels unquestioned obedience to the "supreme leader," who is exalted as the greatest source of political thought. It is enforced by fear and murder even among the elite and accounts for the Kim regime's paranoia and belligerence.

Illustration on white supremacist groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tragedy in Charlottesville

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the "one-drop rule," codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered "black." I wonder what we'd learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the "white nationalists" who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup?

Benjamin Franklin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A riot with an unwelcome lesson

- The Washington Times

The media mob wasted no time in descending on Charlottesville, and the first order of business was to exploit the bigotry, tragedy and evil to make it the work of the Republicans, conservatives, and above all, Donald Trump.

Illustration on the challenge for Trump posed by North Korea by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

Making the best of a bad nuclear hand

- The Washington Times

That so many of the nation's leading Democrats believe President Trump poses a greater threat to world peace than the mad dog leader of a nuclearized North Korea says more about them than either the president or Kim Jong-un.

A THAAD missile being launched       Associated Press photo

Toward a more muscular missile defense

An air of fatalism surrounds much of the coverage of the escalating tensions between North Korea and the United States. If Pyongyang launched a missile at us or at one of our allies, the feeling goes, we could do nothing but brace ourselves for catastrophic damage and loss of life.

Only children can defy perceptions

"Breaking the 'only child' stereotype mold" (Web, Aug. 11) asserts that only children continue to debunk the myth of being selfish, spoiled and self-centered. As an only child, I can attest to the fact that since my singular entrance into the world, I have experienced bias, which is shattered as individuals get to know me.

The USS Gerald Ford         U.S. Navy

'A 100,000-ton message to the world'

As an old Navy man who served as a young enlisted sailor on the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk during the Vietnam War, I was pleased and proud to see the U.S. Navy's newest aircraft carrier, the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), join America's fleet.

People watch a TV screen showing a local news program reporting about North Korean military's plans to launch missiles into waters near Guam, with an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at Seoul Train Station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017. North Korea said Tuesday that leader Kim Jong Un was briefed on his military's plans to launch missiles into waters near Guam as part of an effort to create "enveloping fire" near the U.S. military hub in the Pacific. The letters read "Kim Jong Un, would watch a little more U.S.'s behavior." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

A wise word from the past

"Experience is the teacher of all things," said Julius Caesar. The mighty ruler of Rome would know, but considering the ancient emperor's pointed encounter with sharp knives some things can be better learned through observation at a safe distance.