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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The bad moon rising over Hillary

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton won’t be able to say she didn’t see the bad moon rising. Donald Trump gave her a blistering introduction this week to Presidential Politics 102, which differs in a remarkable way from Politics 101, which she encountered in her first attempt in 2008 and before that as the managing partner in Bubba’s two campaigns.

Illustration on the Obama administration's plans for the fossil fuel industry by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Why Exxon is not the problem

For more than 200 years, the American birthright has provided protection against the threat that one’s head might hang on London Bridge — or the Key Bridge, if you prefer — for disagreeing with the government.

Illustration on the struggle for Kurdish independence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Kurdish independence matters

If the next U.S. president wants “to put America first” he might look toward the Kurdish north of Iraq. There the long-standing question of Kurdish independence scares Washington into a tired reflex that quashes important U.S. interests beneath an unwavering policy to promote the fiction of a unified Iraq.

Illustration on the Republican alternative to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ryan’s Obamacare liberation

Paul Ryan’s House Republican Task Force on health policy reform released on Wednesday the Republican majority’s unified plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans should not be shy about making this reform the centerpiece of this year’s election.

Illustration on the dangers of Obama, the ideologue by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ideologues make for dangerous politicians

Hillary Clinton is a seasoned liberal politician, but one with few core beliefs. Her positions on subjects such as gay marriage, free-trade agreements, the Keystone XL pipeline, the Iraq War, the Assad regime in Syria and the use of the term “radical Islam” all seem to hinge on what she perceives 51 percent of the public to believe on any given day.

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2013, file photo, a student walks across the Lawn in front of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., while the Rotunda was undergoing renovation. Amid scrutiny from Congress and campus activists, colleges across the country are under growing pressure to reveal the financial investments made using their endowments. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Why we need charter public colleges

In 2014 state community colleges and four-year colleges taught more than 13 million students, or about 76 percent of all college students in the nation. But these public institutions are in serious trouble.

Strong Families Make a Strong America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The father factor

Father’s Day has come and gone. The grills are turned off and the gift ties have been put away. The leisurely family time is over and we are all back to the daily grind. But there is much work to do to strengthen America’s families.

Illustration on ineffectual Obama administration strategies against ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama’s disintegrating strategy

Throughout his presidency, Barack Obama has maintained his willful ignorance of the fact that weakness against terrorists abroad, coupled with weakness against them at home, add up to more than the sum of their parts. To defeat terrorists, we need to have policies at home and strategies abroad that are integrated and support each other.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks about the economy at Fort Hayes Vocational School Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Factors that elected Bill could now defeat Hillary

Hillary Clinton knows better than anyone the economy’s weakness and its political danger. The reason George H.W. Bush lost a close race to a political outsider with glaring liabilities 24 years ago was public perception that the economy was weak.

Gosnell in Prison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Kermit Gosnell and the suffering abortion industry

Abortionist and convicted murderer Kermit Gosnell calls himself an “impractical man.” Speaking from his prison cell, where he sits for killing a patient and three born-alive babies, he told one of the documentary filmmakers of “3801 Lancaster: American Tragedy”: “Practical man changes to live within his society.

Illustration on the need for Syrian safe zones by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reconsidering safe zones in Syria

The situation in Syria remains bleak, with no end in sight to its five-year civil war. President Bashar Assad’s forces and their Russian and Iranian backers continue to lay waste to rebel-held territory, leaving the rebels with shrinking leverage to pressure the regime into a lasting political settlement.

Commanders Worth More Than Lawyers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Commanders hold the key to military justice

Some lawmakers seek to remove senior commanders from decisions to refer cases for prosecution. They would place that power with a senior military attorney in another organization, separate from the victim or the accused. Before making such a change, proponents should consider not only recent changes, but also how the proposed changes would affect the combat readiness of our armed forces.

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Saudi Arabian Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman listens in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, during a meeting between Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef and President Barack Obama, in this May 13, 2015, file photo. Saudi Arabia said Tuesday, Dec. 15, that 34 nations have agreed to form a new "Islamic military alliance" to fight terrorism with a joint operations center based in the kingdom's capital, Riyadh. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Revolution in the desert

Forever is a long time, but it doesn't last forever, not even in the Middle East. The Saudis are taking the first baby stops to overhaul their notoriously autocratic regime.

Trump the anti-Obama

Donald Trump is catching flak from liberal media types because he recently had the audacity to question President Obama's handling of the Orlando massacre. Mr. Obama still refuses to label that heinous act radical Islamic terrorism.

FBI agents return to the scene of the mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., Tuesday, June 14, 2016.   (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

FBI under the gun

The Orlando massacre by a homegrown American Muslim who wanted to die a martyr for al Qaeda raises a host of deeply disturbing questions about keeping America safe.

50 origami birds made by Samantha Brouwer and Gabrielle Grace sit around a rainbow flag during a vigil honoring the Orlando shooting victims hosted by the Kalamazoo Gay Lesbian Resource Center in Kalamazoo, Mich. on Monday, June 13, 2016. A gunman has killed dozens of people in a massacre at a crowded gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla. on Sunday, making it the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.  (Chelsea Purgahn/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL RADIO OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

Preventing another Orlando

The Boston Marathon, San Bernardino, and now Orlando -- it goes on and on, as Donald Trump might say. And it is going to continue to get worse, as Mr. Trump already has said. He is the most prescient campaigner in this race for the presidency.

Illustration on the BDS movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Terrorism and economic warfare

Tel Aviv's Sarona Market bills itself as the "heartbeat of Israeli culinary art." Dozens of small restaurants and shops offer cheese, wine, bread, fish, olives, pasta, burgers -- pretty much anything you can imagine and quite a bit that you probably cannot.

Illustration on U.S./Russian cooperation in containing China by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A revitalized U.S.-Russian relationship

Washington seems newly determined to contain China in Asia, but its recent policies -- displays of military might in the South China Sea and overtures to Hanoi -- clearly underscore its tougher stance.

Trump Economy Would Beat Hillary's Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's superior plans on the economy

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton offer Americans a clear choice on the economy. On international trade, taxes and business regulation, he advocates radically different strategies to fire up growth, whereas she would build on President Obama's agenda.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Washington's Immortals: The Untold Story of an Elite Regiment'

As a military historian, Patrick O'Donnell has a passion for walking through battlefields. In 2010, he found himself in a scruffy area of Brooklyn -- auto repair shops, warehouses and the like -- that was the site of one of the first engagements of the Revolutionary summer of 1776.

Illustration on attacking Wahabist ideology by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Attacking the ideology behind terror

In the wake of the worst mass shooting in U.S. history since Sept. 11, 2001, it is pointless to debate whether the Orlando killings constitute just an act of Islamist terror or also an act of hate directed at the LGBT community. Every act of terror springs from hatred of its target, be it a nation or government or community.

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Saturday, June 11, 2016, at a private hanger at Greater Pittsburgh International Airport in Moon, Pa. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) ** FILE **

Donald Trump's ground-game problem

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump needs a robust ground game to defeat Hillary Clinton in November, and there's worry his campaign lacks the organization and funds needed to build one.

WITH STORY BRITAIN EU FUTURE - In this Friday, June 26, 2015 file photo, British Prime Minister David Cameron pauses before speaking during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels.  Opinion polls suggest a vote could go either way on June 23, 2016 when Britain chooses whether to leave the 28-nation bloc it joined in 1973. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)

Brexit and a turn to the right

Arguments over the role of Britain in Europe will continue beyond the outcome of the referendum June 23 on whether Britain should leave the European Union, which appears more likely than it did a fortnight ago. A stunning new public-opinion poll shows a dramatic 10-point swing in public opinion, and what the British call "Brexit," or "British exit," now favors leaving, and by a substantial margin.

President Barack Obama speaks to members of the media in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2016.  Obama said there's no clear evidence that the shooter at an Orlando nightclub was directed to conduct his attack or part of a larger plot. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Massacre in Orlando

Orlando is the home of Disneyworld, but it's clear that Mickey Mouse has a second home at Barack Obama's White House. In the wake of the Sunday attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando, with 50 dead and 53 others left wounded, President Obama presented the grim face that Americans have come to expect after such acts of horror.

To save U.S., back Trump

Mitt Romney's scathing remarks about Donald Trump's competency to be president are hypocritical, to say the least — particularly given that in 2008 Romney betrayed the Republican Party in his feckless presidential debate against President Obama.

Huge Government Expense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Bursting the false narrative

At the end of this past week, The Washington Post ran a long story on the Center for Freedom and Prosperity (CFP), an organization that I have long supported. It appeared that the original goal was to do a hit piece on CFP because it had been a leader in the fight for global tax competition and smaller government.

Flag Day Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Flag Day to remember

Flag Day in 1916 in the nation's capital was one of firsts and superlatives. Never before had Old Glory been raised to the top of the Washington Monument. But 11 sailors and an officer, manipulating a record length rope that had been spliced to reach the northeast corner of the windows at the top, achieved the feat.

Illustration on ISIS by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Needed: A declaration of war

Credit President Obama for finally using the words he has desperately tried to avoid during his presidency. He correctly called the mass shooting in an Orlando gay nightclub Sunday morning, which killed 49 and injured 53, "an act of terror." It was, writes The New York Times, the "deadliest attack on a gay target in the nation's history."