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Former US President Barack Obama is awarded the German Media Prize 2016 in Baden-Baden, Germany, Thursday, May 25, 2017.(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Cutting Taxes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A rare chance to boost small businesses

Among the many lessons our current leadership should learn from Ronald Reagan’s effective governance are his initiatives to revitalize the American economy. Most relevant today is remembering President Reagan’s tax cuts and corporate tax reform of 1986 enacted with bipartisan support that produced sustained economic growth.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a sword and sways with traditional dancers during a welcome ceremony at Murabba Palace, in Riyadh. Trump and his entourage were treated to a traditional all-male Saudi sword dance. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the Saudi king, Trump swayed side to side and briefly joined the groove. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump’s vision for the Middle East

President Trump arrived in the Arabian desert hoping to realign the politics of the Middle East in the aftermath of a failed Obama policy. For eight years, President Obama tilted in the direction of Iran, believing that the influence of the Shia could balance Sunni dominance.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security’s Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

Related Articles

Tyranny's tyranny, no matter flavor

After ratification of the Constitution, Benjamin Franklin was said to have walked out of Independence Hall and been asked by a passer-by, "What have you created?" Franklin replied, "A democracy, if you can keep it." Franklin contemporary Thomas Jefferson is credited with having said, "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing " Franklin, Jefferson and many of the Founders were powerful thinkers on social, religious, scientific, moral and secular matters. Yet they knew they needed each other if they had any hope of their new nation surviving.

State Rep. Jody Richards, D-Bowling Green, reads a story to Head Start children at Community Action of Southern Kentucky, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Bowling Green, Ky. (Bac Totrong/Daily News via AP)

Good First Amendment news

Sometimes there's a nugget of something good in the daily ration of bad news. A T-shirt printer in Lexington, Ky., one Blaine Adamson, won a state court ruling early this month that he was within his First Amendment rights to refuse to print an offensive message on T-shirts ordered by the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization for a "gay pride" parade.

President Donald Trump listens to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, left, speak during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A promise not kept

During the late, lamented campaign of 2016, when brave talk was in season, Donald Trump promised faithfully that once he was president he would take the United States out of the infamous Paris climate accord, an international agreement signed and promoted by Barack Obama that locks the United States into all kinds of anti-competitive things "to combat global climate change."

Selling out Israel will backfire

When an unidentified high-ranking State Department official said that the Western Wall was not part of Israel — despite the wall's having been indisputably in Israel proper for the past 50 years — there were immediate protests from not only Jews, but evangelical Christians as well. Now, to the dismay of those concerned about the security of Israel and its biblical and historical background, President Trump's national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, is refusing to contradict this official's ludicrous statement ("Top Trump aide won't say if Western Wall is part of Israel," Web, May 16).

In this May 16, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump welcomes Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to the White House in Washington. The Trump administration faced growing calls Thursday for a forceful response to violence by Turkish presidential guards on American soil, who were briefly detained this week but then set free. The unseemly incident added to U.S.-Turkish tensions that are being compounded by a growing spat over U.S. war strategy against the Islamic State group in Syria. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

No use trying to satisfy demanding Democrats

A close relative shared with me his thoughts on the odd situation we find ourselves in these days, where Republicans are in charge of the Congress and the White House yet it feels as if the minority Democrats are running the show.

U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres, center, addresses the European Parliament, while EU Parliament president Antonio Tajani leaves in Strasbourg, eastern France, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

EU deepens its own crisis with attacks on Hungary, Poland

The European Parliament has condemned Hungary for human rights issues and a breakdown of the rule of law. Brussels is now threatening all-out financial war against both Hungary and Poland, among others, for alleged human rights abuses and anti-democratic policies and actions. But with conservative governments insisting on their sovereign right to protect their borders and preserve their national identities, Europe is headed for an existential crisis from which it may not recover in its current form.

In this Sept. 13, 2016, file photo, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)

Jason Chaffetz's right: Where's the memo, Mr. Comey?

- The Washington Times

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz, in a Thursday "Good Morning America" interview, wondered aloud where the now-famous James Comey memos were -- and whether the fired FBI director really was going to release them for public viewing. These are good questions. The American public has a right to see the so-called evidence being used to take down President Donald Trump.

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, FBI Director James Comey listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Comey: Higher-ups never asked for halt to FBI investigations

- The Washington Times

James Comey, just-fired FBI director, said in a Senate hearing earlier this month that he's never been asked by higher-ups to back off an investigation for political reasons, an interesting remark given the fact President Donald Trump's now being accused of that very thing.

The U.S. flag flies in front of the Capitol dome on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 4, 2017. (Associated Press) **FILE**

A dumb amendment for a dumber age

May 20 marks 25 years since the 27th Amendment to the Constitution was declared ratified -- more than 200 years after it was first proposed to the states.

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon talks, during First Minister's Questions at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, Thursday May 11, 2017. Britain will hold a general election on June 8. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

The big hack attack and the NHS

The ransomware cyberattack that wormed its way into at least 74 countries recently exposed new vulnerabilities in the United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS), as if it weren't vulnerable enough.

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto, top left, pauses while speaking to the press, at the end of a press conference where he announced measures intended to protect journalists, in Mexico City, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Pena said he is taking actions to halt slayings of journalists, without giving specifics, and promised more resources to help those under threat. Past measures have been ineffective in stopping the bloodshed among the country's media workers. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

When the press plays 'gotcha,' nobody wins

It's a difficult time to be proud of everything about America. The president is vilified from all sides (some criticism deserved, some not), and what's difficult to defend is the democratic process as we've used it to produce both the likes of Donald Trump and the press that rushes like lemmings to judgment.

Contraception in Catholic Colleges Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Catholic collegiate contraception complicity

President Trump's latest executive order titled "Promoting Free Speech and Religious Liberty," potentially ends the enforcement of the Obama administration's Health and Human Services (HHS) contraception mandate requiring all employers -- including religious institutions -- to provide health insurance that covers contraception.

Illustration on the challenge of Middle East peace negotiations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Five steps toward achieving Middle East peace

Donald Trump's decision to visit Saudi Arabia during his first overseas trip as president creates the perfect opportunity for his administration to take positive steps toward addressing five key needs in the region.

Trump Still Has All His Marbles Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turning political disagreement into a disease

How could legislators get rid of a president who appalls them but who has not committed high crimes and misdemeanors, the conventional legal grounds for impeachment?

Illustration on investigating government leaks by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Donald Trump's seven days in May

In a period of seven days this month, President Trump fired James Comey as director of the FBI and was accused of sharing top-secret intelligence data with the Russian foreign minister and the Russian ambassador to the United States, the latter a known Russian spy.

Political 'twilight zone'

Welcome to the real-life twilight zone. During the first scene you'll notice the Islamic immigration policies of Western nations. The general populace in these in these countries does not desire these policies, yet the governments force them on their people -- despite the fact that they bring an increase in crime and political demonstrations. Notice that the news media promotes these policies and keeps silent on immigrant crimes, such as rape of native women.