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Donald Trump (Associated Press)

The Donald tries out for the team

- The Washington Times

Now even Donald Trump is taking himself seriously. He’s trying now to be colorful without being reckless, careful not to be rude when he doesn’t have to be, and playing less the showboat and more like someone trying out for the team.

Illustration on Hillary's redacted classified emails by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton redacted

It is clear by now that a large number of Hillary Clinton’s emails that she sent or received on her private computer system contained classified information.

Illustration critical of Saudi Arabia's human rights record by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Confronting Saudi repression

Of all Washington’s embarrassing friends, few are more troubling than the king of Saudi Arabia, who will meet President Obama on Friday.

Criticism of Azerbaijan by the United States Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Misrepresenting Azerbaijan

Over the last several years, the Republic of Azerbaijan, widely acknowledged and praised for its commitment and pursuit of religious tolerance, has become a target of harsh criticism by the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIF).

Behind the Eight Ball Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Blaming white racism for violence

Last week, reporter Alison Parker and photojournalist Adam Ward — both white — were murdered in cold blood on television by Vester Lee Flanigan, a black man.

Obama Legacy: Ex-patriots Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How expatriates are forging an Obama legacy

The State Department recently announced that a record number of Americans in 2014 gave up their citizenship and decided to live elsewhere. Last year’s figure of 3,415 was a 14 percent increase over the previous record, 2,999, in 2013.

Illustration on the National Zoo pandas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What the ‘Save the Pandas’ campaign reveals

For years, the National Zoo has come under fire, including in a blistering 2013 Congressional report over gross negligence, a scathing 2004 National Academy of Sciences report into animal deaths at the zoo and, somewhere in between, an investigation revealing that the zoo had disposed of some wild animals by sending them to a canned hunting outfit and to a petting zoo.

Laws Protecting Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When comprehensive legislation is counterproductive

The announcement by the House Republican leadership that the Innovation Act (H.R. 9) will not be scheduled for a vote this summer has the bill’s supporters concerned but not yet alarmed.

Illustration on the one percent and the American dream by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The American Dream lives

The American Dream couldn’t be more alive but there are those promoting class warfare who are certainly trying to kill it off. A recent Gallup poll (May 2015) shows that 63 percent of those polled feel that wealth and money should be more evenly distributed in America.

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Illustration on the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

The Parchin Precedent

Initially, I thought the news was beyond parody. The Associated Press last week ran a story headlined: "U.N. to let Iran inspect nuke work site."

An activist marches in the protest march called the GoTopless Day Parade Sunday, Aug. 23, 2015, in New York. The parade took to the streets to counter critics who are complaining about topless tip-seekers in Times Square. Appearing bare-breasted is legal in New York. But Mayor Bill de Blasio and police Commissioner Bill Bratton say the body-painted women in the square who take photos with tourists are a nuisance. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen)

Mammary menace in Manhattan

Nothing excites teenage boys and lascivious men quite like the sight of the female breast. In New York City, where sophistication was invented (ask any New Yorker), some see mammary menace the governor and the mayor see opportunity.

U.S. heroes deserve more

French President Francois Hollande immediately recognized the heroic actions taken by three quick-thinking young Americans, a French citizen and a British grandfather in preventing a great threat to human life on Aug. 21 ("Americans, Briton who thwarted train attack get France's top honor," Web, Aug. 25).

Hackers responsible for deaths

A group recently hacked into AshleyMadison.com, exposing millions of infidelities. This has already resulted in two possible suicides ("Ashley Madison fallout includes extortion, possible suicides; $500,000 reward offered," Web, Aug. 24).

Typhoon Bopha is shown moving toward the Philippines in an Earth Observatory image from Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. (AP Photo/U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Jesse Allen)

A degree of uncertainty

Everybody knows July is hot, unless he lives somewhere below the equator, where the seasons are upside down. Government scientists say this past month was the hottest July ever.

The Flying Tigers in China, 1942 (Associated Press)

Recalling the heroics of the Flying Tigers

During the dark days of World War II, American pilots provided hope, grit, military support and brotherhood to the Chinese people battling the scourge of an overwhelming, often brutal invasion.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Midnight's Furies'

Sixty-eight years ago this August, India finally realized what its founding father Jawaharlal Nehru elegantly phrased its "tryst with destiny" and finally cast off British rule.

Illustration on the African political consequences U.S. legitimization of Iran through the Obama nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An African angle to the Iran nuclear deal

Most criticism of the U.S. administration's negotiation with Iran over its nuclear program points out a long list of relevant issues not addressed in the deal itself.

Bees on the Chalkboard Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A liberal dose of propaganda

Like a swarm of bees, back-to-school advertisements sting vacationing kids with the reminder that the first day of school is around the corner.

Illustration on a remedy for rising food stamp use by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An unhealthy dependence on food stamps

Good news: The number of Americans using food stamps in 2014 declined slightly from the previous year. So why does the 2015 Index of Culture and Opportunity say this indicator is headed in the "wrong direction"?

Jimmy Carter     Associated Press photo

Jimmy Carter's peace

When Ronald Reagan announced in November 1994 he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, even some of his most ardent political opponents paused to wish him well.

Vice President Joe Biden. (Associated Press)

Now the real fun is about to begin

- The Washington Times

This may be the most entertaining road show yet. Round and round the presidential campaign goes, and where it stops nobody knows. Even Mitt Romney is said to be thinking about jumping in again, no doubt figuring that some of Jeb's "investors," who are familiar indeed, may be looking for another place to place their bets.

Plentiful Wi-Fi Availability Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Easing the Wi-Fi spectrum crunch

The U.S. Small Business Administration and Census Bureau reports that there are more than 28 million small businesses that create over 90 percent of all new jobs in the nation.

'Welfare' abuse extends further up

Both "Boot camp, not benefits" and "When welfare beats work" (Web, Aug. 19) make good points: Welfare for the poor is expensive and too comfortable and it fosters mutual political dependence between recipients and government -- and of course, we need to do something about the whole thing.