Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

The deadly impact of identity politics

In the aftermath of the horror of the Charlottesville riot, there’s been less condemnation by the media and the left of the neo-Nazi that is charged with murdering Heather Heyer and injuring at least 19 others than there has been of President Trump.

Illustration on the need for a U.S. comprehensive peace strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

In search of a grand U.S. strategy

Richard Nixon’s rapprochement with China, the end of the Cold War, President Obama’s outreach to “the Muslim world,” the growth of the (largely American-funded) United Nations — weren’t such developments supposed to lead to a safer world, one in which the “international community” would embrace “universal values” and pursue common interests — peace and security key among them?

Illustration on CNN and "the moron vote" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Controversy at a pious cable news outlet

Last week CNN fired Jeffrey Lord, its famously pro-Trump contributor, for mocking an activist whom The Daily Caller has reported as a racist and an anti-Semite. Mr. Lord addressed him with the salutation, “Sieg Heil!” What is wrong with that? Is CNN covering for racists and anti-Semites?

Illustration on U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

A new strategy for Afghanistan: change course, quit the fight

It has been reported in recent days that President Trump has angrily rejected the latest recommendation from his national security staff for a new Afghan war strategy. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, in other venues, has claimed the reason for the delay is that forming strategy is “hard work.”

A man casts his vote at a polling place Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Provo, Utah. The winner of a three-way Republican primary, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Utah will become the favorite to win the November special election and fill the congressional seat recently vacated by Jason Chaffetz. Republicans outnumber Democrats five-to-one in Utah's 3rd Congressional District, which stretches from the Salt Lake City suburbs and several ski towns southeast to Provo and Utah coal country. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Resisting election integrity

The Election Integrity Commission will resume its work in September, now that the frivolous lawsuits against it are, one by one, being dismissed. The most recent case is in New Hampshire, where the American Civil Liberties Union has dropped a case over sharing publicly available voter information with the commission. The Granite State compromised and will comply. More states are beginning to come around.

Illustration on a possible North Korean EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The other North Korean threat

After massive intelligence failures grossly underestimating North Korea’s long-range missile capabilities, number of nuclear weapons, warhead miniaturization, and proximity to manufacturing a hydrogen bomb, the biggest North Korean threat to the United States remains unacknowledged.

Benjamin Franklin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A riot with an unwelcome lesson

- The Washington Times

The media mob wasted no time in descending on Charlottesville, and the first order of business was to exploit the bigotry, tragedy and evil to make it the work of the Republicans, conservatives, and above all, Donald Trump.

President Donald Trump walks across the tarmac to board Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. Trump is traveling back to Washington to sign an executive order at the White House and then later today travels to New York City. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump on Charlottesville: Danged if he does, danged if he doesn’t

- The Washington Times

The immediate aftermath of the widely reported Charlottesville violence wasn’t so much a media look at the issues, or the car-plowing suspect and victims, or even the demographics of the protesters — that many came from out of state to stand strong against a small-town statue of Robert E. Lee — as it was a cause to criticize President Donald Trump. But why all the angst against the president?

Illustration on white supremacist groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tragedy in Charlottesville

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the “one-drop rule,” codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered “black.” I wonder what we’d learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the “white nationalists” who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup?

Illustration on the challenge for Trump posed by North Korea by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

Making the best of a bad nuclear hand

- The Washington Times

That so many of the nation’s leading Democrats believe President Trump poses a greater threat to world peace than the mad dog leader of a nuclearized North Korea says more about them than either the president or Kim Jong-un.

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Juche’ or consequences

“Juche” — the ideology of North Korea — compels unquestioned obedience to the “supreme leader,” who is exalted as the greatest source of political thought. It is enforced by fear and murder even among the elite and accounts for the Kim regime’s paranoia and belligerence.

The USS Gerald Ford         U.S. Navy

‘A 100,000-ton message to the world’

As an old Navy man who served as a young enlisted sailor on the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk during the Vietnam War, I was pleased and proud to see the U.S. Navy’s newest aircraft carrier, the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), join America’s fleet.

Related Articles

Trump's 'fire and fury' sure beats Obama's butt-kissing

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, as the media's been steadily reporting for hours now, has vowed to respond to North Korea's ongoing threats against the United States with "fire and fury." The timid have gasped. But the truth is: North Korea deserves this response. The regime brought it on itself. And without a doubt, Trump's hardline approach beats Barack Obama's timid wait-and-see approach.

In this Nov. 14, 2016, file photo, Caitlyn Jenner arrives at the Glamour Women of the Year Awards in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File) **FILE**

Caitlyn Jenner commits a hat crime

Imagine this: Someone goes through massive body-altering, gender-changing surgery, changes her life and risks the rejection of her family, all in order to be her genuine self.

Illustration of Bashar Assad by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

One for the graveyard of Middle East predictions

"The Middle East is the graveyard of predictions" notes the left-wing writer and editor Adam Shatz. That's partly because it's so volatile (no one in 2014 imagined the revival of an executive caliphate after 11 centuries) and it's perverse (Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan started a near-civil war against the Kurds to win constitutional powers he already enjoys).

Illustration on international aid to Africa by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Africa development imperative

Africa, the world's poorest continent, will see its population double over the next three decades. Without significant development progress, this population tidal wave will cause great human suffering, trigger destabilizing migrations and impact global security.

President Donald Trump listens as Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C. speaks during a meeting with the Republican Study Committee, Friday, March 17, 2017, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Why the West must cut the apologies

In early July, President Trump delivered what many believe was his best speech to date. Speaking at Krasinski Square in Warsaw, Poland, Mr. Trump gave an unabashed defense of the cultural values that have made Western civilization great.

Illustration on outsourcing U.S. air power in Afghanistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Outsourcing the air war in Afghanistan

Erik Prince, the owner of the former Blackwater security company, has proposed that the U.S. military outsource the air war in Afghanistan to him. Gen. John Nicholson, who currently commands the NATO effort in the war, has apparently refused to give the Prince proposal an airing.

Illustration on the hidden costs of hospitalization by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sickening hospital bills

A Yale study, and an accompanying profile in The New York Times, made waves this month for exposing what's called "surprise billing." This occurs when a patient receives a high, out-of-network bill for care received at an in-network hospital.

Get back to two houses

If President Trump made a blunder during his campaign, it was that he placed all his emphasis on the presidency and did not ask for new Republican members of Congress from the new patriot movement. We sent the same establishment Republicans to Washington, and we are getting the same squishiness and pre-emptive surrender to socialist, statist, totalitarian Democrats we got before.

Empower group to end drug crisis

Forty-five years ago, President Richard Nixon declared drug abuse "public enemy number one" and established a White House special action office to reduce addiction and related deaths. President Trump has called drug abuse a national crisis and signed an executive order establishing the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis. According to the commission's chairman, "to say we have a crisis here is an understatement" and conditions warrant declaration of a state of emergency.

A rescue drone flies during a training flight operation in the Atlantic beach of Biscarrosse, southwestern France, Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017. A cutting-edge lifesaving initiative is taking flight again this summer off France's popular Atlantic beach destinations: the rescue drone. Following a successful launch in 2016, three airborne life-saver drones are being operated in the southwestern Nouvelle-Aquitaine region spots until September to come to the aid of swimmers struggling in choppy water.(AP Photo/Bob Edme)

The summer of discontent

The steamy days of August are cooking up a summer of discontent. Like much of what lies beyond the front door, the reasons for the national angst are complicated and often contradictory. Raucous noise from the nation's capital plays a big role in how Americans see the landscape, but waiting for a wind to freshen the air above the Washington swamp might be a long wait.

Remembering a beloved vacation home

In his important 1989 book "The Great Good Place," Dan Oldenburg gave us the term "a third place," by which he meant a special and vitally important social place other than home or work.