Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Hiroshima

No second thoughts about a bomb for Hiroshima

- The Washington Times

The pointless debate continues. As reliable as the arrival of the scorching heat and drenching humidity of August, comes the debate (mostly by academics) over whether the United States is guilty of moral outrage for having dropped the atomic bombs on Japan on Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, to put an end to the carnage of World War II.

Illustration on the virtues of the private Donald Trump               The Washington Times

The two Donald Trumps

Love him or hate him, no one has been able to figure out Donald Trump. No one, that is, except Norma Foerderer.

Illustration on Russian advances in the arctic by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Playing catch-up in the Arctic

The U.S. Government Accountability Office says that the Obama administration is forcing our military to measure ice levels in the resources-rich Arctic. The president’s thinking, according to reports, is that shrinking ice could force us to institute a “military and homeland security presence” in the region.

Rica Madrid poses for a photograph as she rolls a joint in her home on the first day of legal possession of marijuana for recreational purposes, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, in Washington. Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser defied threats from Congress by implementing a voter-approved initiative on Thursday, making the city the only place east of the Mississippi River where people can legally grow and share marijuana in private. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Tracking the trends

Why do we follow the news? To be informed, of course. We naturally want to be aware of what’s happening at home and around the world.

Illustration on the civil rights of the unborn by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the abortion tide turns

Anew Facebook profile photo is beginning to spread on the Internet, especially among members of the rising millennial generation. It’s a picture of a baby within the womb. Superimposed on the baby is an equal sign.

Illustration of myths about the benefits of raising the capital gains tax by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five myths about capital gains taxes

The late, great Jack Kemp, an architect of the Reagan tax cuts, used to say “without capital, capitalism is just another ism.” Capital is the plant, the machinery, the computers, and trucks that businesses invest in to become productive and efficient providers of goods and services.

Empowering individual workers rather than union bosses

This week, Sen Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, and Rep. Tom Price, Georgia Republican, introduced a new proposal to rebalance the rights and the law regarding employees and union bosses. The Employee Rights Act (ERA) is a package of widely supported reforms that will stop workplace abuses of both union and non-union employees by big labor unions. The ERA gives individual employees the power to control their own money, personal information, and choice for legal representation in the workplace.

Illustration on arming airline pilots by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring safety in airliner cockpits

Airline pilots have always been armed, except for a period from 1988 to 2002 when passivity in the face of violence somehow seemed logical. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, many wondered why pilots were ever disarmed. Congress passed the law that rearmed airline pilots with large, bipartisan, veto proof majorities in both houses of Congress. Rearming airline pilots has proven to be safe, very inexpensive and a highly effective deterrent to those who would use civilian airliners filled with innocent people as weapons of mass destruction.

Illustration on Union violence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Closing a union-violence loophole

On July 20, U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson sentenced Joseph Dougherty, the former boss of Philadelphia-based Local 401 of the Ironworkers union, to 19 years in prison for “overseeing a years-long campaign of sabotage, arson, and intimidation,” as Philadelphia Inquirer staff writer Jeremy Roebuck put it. Mr. Dougherty’s targets were nonunion construction employees and employers.

(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Barack Obama, you’re no Ronald Reagan’

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that ” where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be.”

Related Articles

President Barack Obama speaks at the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution, in El Reno, Okla., Thursday, July 16, 2015. As part of a weeklong focus on inequities in the criminal justice system, the president will meet separately Thursday with law enforcement officials and nonviolent drug offenders who are paying their debt to society at the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution, a medium-security prison for male offenders near Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The mullahs rub some noses in Obama's folly

- The Washington Times

The Iranians, having hornswoggled Barack Obama and John Kerry, are giddy with euphoria. Ordinarily the parties to an agreement would help each other sell it to the skeptical and the suspicious in their ranks, not least by keeping their traps shut. But not these guys.

More Planned Parenthood abhorrence

It's been a tough year for the conservative community in America. We've seen a dismaying Supreme Court decision on gay marriage, liberalization of marijuana laws and more. Yet in the past two weeks we have learned of an issue so revolting that it makes one nauseated: An anti-abortion group, the Center for Medical Progress (CMP), published a secretly taped video of a telling discussion with Deborah Nucatola, director of medical services for Planned Parenthood. In the video, Nucatola candidly discloses how the premier abortion organization sells aborted body parts "Covert video targets Planned Parenthood fetal-parts policy," Web, July 14).

Iran deal sacrifices Israel

Recently Secretary of State John Kerry issued a draconian proclamation in defense of the Iran deal. He warned that if Congress rejects the plan, "Our friends in this effort will desert us." The dreadful irony of this statement immediately arrested me.

Illustration on GOP's expanded campaigning on social media by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Cow bells, dog whistles and the Grand Old Party

The Republicans are desperately trying to get hip. Pursuing the latest new thing is not in the Republican DNA, but it's necessary to win elections. They have to tap into the popular culture of social media to woo the younger generation of voters, and that requires a digital strategy.

Waste and Mismanagement in Prince George's County Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the problem isn't revenue but out-of-control spending

- The Washington Times

Maryland, like Illinois, is famous as an integrity-free zone. Former governors, the heads of various school systems in the state, legislators, county executives and law enforcement officials have ended their careers in federal and state penal institutions for confusing serving the public with serving themselves at the public's expense.

Illustration on the imperative need for Congress to reject the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama and Hillary bulldoze the promise of 'never again'

- The Washington Times

In the 70 years since the Holocaust, the phrase "never again" was never followed by a question mark. It had always been a declarative statement. Never again would the world sit by while systematic mass murder was carried out. And yet, given the deal the Obama administration has struck with the Islamic Republic of Iran to clear its path to nuclear weapons, it seems we have forgotten what it means to say -- and live -- "never again."

Illustration on sunsetting the existing Federal Tax Code by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sunsetting the current tax code

Two active Republican presidential candidates have released thoughtful and detailed tax reform plans, and a third has renewed his call for the tax overhaul he promoted in 2008.

Illustration on the evils of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rotten to the core

The late Richard Pryor obviously wrote the defense used by the wonderful folks at Planned Parenthood, whose senior executives got caught on camera, twice, haggling over the price of the body parts -- lungs, livers, brains -- lifted from the bodies of unborn babies.

A voter can be seen in a voting booth Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014 in Honolulu.  Despite the rains and winds from Tropical Storm Iselle that pounded the state Friday, Hawaii will hold primary elections today.  (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Keeping the ballot secure

"Your vote counts" is a snappy slogan just short enough to fit on a lapel button, but snappy is not the same as "secure." As the 2016 campaign unfolds, there's renewed interest in enabling voters to vote over the Internet. The notion that choosing a president could be as easy as using a smartphone to order a pizza is tempting to some, but until cybersecurity wizards prove that a vote cast is a vote counted, Internet balloting is unreliably risky.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Bennington Girls are Easy'

"Bennington Girls Are Easy" has a title and cover that scream "chick-lit," but author Charlotte Silver has written a novel that is more than that. Her chicks, Cassandra Puffin and Sylvie Furst, start out as excited, ditzy, newly minted alums of Bennington College trying to make it in New York.

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump holds up a sheet of paper as he talks about calling fellow GOP presidential candidate Lindsey Graham during his South Carolina campaign kickoff rally in Bluffton on July 21, 2015. (Associated Press)

Trump's real problem

I could get behind the idea of a businessman instead of a politician, but not this businessman.

Respect differences

An armed man walks into building, opens fire and kills nine people, all of the same race. Who or what provided this opportunity? Can one walk into a shopping mall, movie theater or restaurant, randomly open fire and kill nine people of a specific race? It certainly could not happen at a public school or university, a military base or any other government institution. How ironic that it took a church to provide such a target-rich environment. Yet places of worship is the very place where diversity is taught as virtue, and not enforced as law.

No haircut for the First Amendment

Once upon a time, the idea of giving the First Amendment a haircut never occurred to anyone. The constitutional guarantee of free speech was held to be the cornerstone of the unique American experiment in government of the people, by the people, and for the people. The Founding Fathers wrote it, plain, direct and so unambiguous that even a United States senator could understand it.