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In this March 20, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu huddle during their joint news conference in Jerusalem, Israel. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The occasion the Democrats asked for

- The Washington Times

The Democrats set out to teach John Boehner and Benjamin Netanyahu a lesson. They would boycott the Israeli prime minister’s speech to Congress and apply enough pressure to cancel the speech, keep Mr. Netanyahu at home and embarrass the Republicans who invited him here. What a happy day’s work that would be.

American Defense if Israel Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Standing with Israel in a dangerous world

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Such an invitation is one of the highest honors we can bestow on a foreign leader. And such a speech is normally an occasion of unity in Washington, when elected officials put partisan politics aside and come together to focus on weighty issues of national security.

Failure to Protect Against Iranian Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Iran goes nuclear

Our attention these days with regard to security is understandably riveted on the Islamic State, or ISIS, and its hideous decapitations, rapes and live immolations. We must deal with the Islamic State, but it is not the gravest threat we face. The Israelis are right — we should awaken to the fact that the coming of a nuclear Iran holds special dangers and requires particularly urgent attention. There are four driving reasons.

Obama Veto of Keystone Pipeline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Keystone XL pipeline veto

Experienced vote counters do not believe that either the House or the Senate will muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill. If so, Mr. Obama’s years of delay and disingenuousness on this issue, culminating in his veto, will guarantee negative consequences for America long into the future.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures while addressing the 2015 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Standing with Israel

A world leader giving an address to Congress shouldn’t be controversial, especially when that leader is the prime minister of a major U.S. ally — indeed, a bulwark of freedom in a deeply troubled region of the world.

Attendees vote in the CPAC 2015 Straw Poll at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

CPAC then and now

A conservative reflects on the annual confab.

Illustration on the progressive tax structure by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Do the rich pay their fair share?

Suppose there were a banquet for 100 people and at the end of the night it was time to split the bill of $50 per person. If that bill were paid for the way we pay our income taxes, here is how it would work. Those in the top half of income would pay roughly $97 each and those in the bottom half of the income would pay an average of $3 each. Almost 40 people would pay nothing. And the single richest person in the room would cough up $1,750.

Illustration on the state of American liberty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

CPAC, freedom and saving the country

Attendees of last week’s Conservative Political Action Committee (CPAC), the nation’s largest conference for conservatives, heard a few tried and true conservative messages from potential presidential candidates and activists alike — calls for lower taxes, more freedom for business, a strong national defense, the importance of killing the enemy and the need for a serious foreign policy.

Illustration on continuing political and existential threats to Israel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Much ado about the wrong Israeli controversy

The brouhaha over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s March 3 speech to Congress is diverting attention from more important U.S.-Israel controversies that will escalate soon after this comparatively minor contretemps fizzles out.

Illustration on patent protection by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent ‘reform’ is killing the right to invent

With the best intentions, and naively going along with the corporate world’s hugely financed publicity machine, Congress is about to stomp on America’s most creative citizens, its inventors.

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Secretary of State John Kerry addresses a gathering of the Export-Import Bank at the Omni-Shoreham Hotel in Washington, Thursday, April 24, 2014.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Oppose the Ex-Im bank

The debate over the Ex-Im Bank exposes the sad truth that the alliance of elected officials from both political parties and big business remain a key barrier to limited government.

Persecution of European Jews Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Forgetting the hard lessons of appeasement

When news broke of the terror attacks in Denmark, a close friend of Danish descent called me to vent his frustration that once again Jews were being murdered in Europe. He reminded me when such atrocities were happening during World War II, Danish citizens rescued their Jewish countrymen.

Minimal understanding of the minimum wage

In an interview with BuzzFeed last week, President Obama invoked the CEO pay gap — the disparity between top executives and employee staff compensation — to publicly shame companies like Staples for appearing to circumvent the Affordable Care Act's 30-hour workweek mandate. "I haven't looked at Staples stock lately or what the compensation of the CEO is, but I suspect that they could well afford to treat their workers favorably," he said.

Brian Williams

Obama's blind indifference to Islamic terror

- The Washington Times

The threat of radical Islamic terrorism is so clear and plain that even a president could see it. But Barack Obama is blind, deaf or indifferent, and maybe all three, and determined to keep himself that way.

China Control of Regional Waterways Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

China's water grab

Marxists a century or so ago believed that what they called "Oriental despotism" arose in Asia because of the need in China and elsewhere to control the water supply. In 1957, Karl Wittfogel's work on the subject, "Oriental Despotism," was published, warning that the need to control water for irrigation and other purposes in the region had given birth to a totalitarian state unlike any that had developed in the West.

American Resilience and Confidence Building Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Five days that revived America

Thirty-five years ago this month, America began its climb back from the malaise and uncertainty that defined the decade of the 1970s. Two tracks, one sports-related and one political, combined to give America a renewed sense of confidence that would usher in the dynamic decade of the 1980s.

Democratic U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, of Massachusetts speaks to a group of supporters at a rally in support of Kentucky democratic candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes, Sunday, June 29, 2014 at the University of Louisville in Louisville, Ky. Warren has been canvassing the country following a failed vote in the U.S. Senate that would have allowed some people to refinance their student loan debt to take advantage of lower interest rates.  (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Elizabeth Warren named 'Porker of the Year' by taxpayer watchdog

- The Washington Times

It may not play well in Peoria or anywhere else should she enter the White House race. Populist favorite Sen. Elizabeth Warren has been named the 2014 Porker of the Year by Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a frugal-minded watchdog group that monitors lawmakers, offices and agencies. The Massachusetts Democrat won the title over six other nominees in a public poll, with 34 percent of the vote.

How the animals follow their dreams

Elsie Bovary is a good name for a cow: Elsie, which immediately brings to mind the Borden Company cow, and Bovary, Flaubert's restless heroine whose name is derived from the late Latin "bovinus." Thus it is entirely fitting for that star of stage, screen and television, David Duchovny, to name his heroine "Elsie Bovary" for Elsie is one adventurous cow.

FILE - This Feb, 19, 2012 file photo shows the Volkswagen logo on the hood of a 2012 Beetle at a Volkswagen dealership in the south Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo. Volkswagen on Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 announced it is recalling 442,000 Jettas and Beetles to fix a problem that can cause rear suspension failure if the cars aren't fixed properly after a crash. The recall covers 2011 through 2013 Jettas and 2012 through 2013 Beetles. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

The Chattanooga Boo-Hoo

Valentine's Day marked the first anniversary of the defeat of an attempt by the United Auto Workers to organize the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The Detroit-based union spent years and millions of dollars trying to organize workers at the German-owned factory on the Tennessee-Georgia border, and lost decisively in an election supervised by the National Labor Relations Board.

In this image released by Warner Bros. Pictures, Kyle Gallner, left, and Bradley Cooper appear in a scene from "American Sniper."  The film is based on the autobiography by Chris Kyle. (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures)

Me$$age from the box office

The movie "American Sniper" passed $300 million in box-office receipts last weekend, on pace to become the top-grossing R-rated film ever. The enormous appeal of Clint Eastwood's movie about the life and military career of Chris Kyle, a U.S. Navy SEAL marksman, naturally puzzles Hollywood liberals who think they understand America. They'll have something to talk about at the 87th Academy Awards gala Sunday night.

Return to Judeo-Christianity needed now

In "As anti-Semitism makes a comeback, Obama remains ignorant" (Web, Feb. 16) Wesley Pruden writes "The Islamic State, or ISIS, with its dreams of a worldwide caliphate ruled by Islam from the Dark Ages, videotapes the beheading of 21 Coptic Christians in Libya, puts their severed heads on display ... " These terrorists are obviously very proud of this accomplishment, having absolutely no respect for any type of human life that won't bow down to Allah. Even the Nazis must have had some knowledge of what is right or wrong, since they tried to hide their most evil deeds.

Roots of Terrorism Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The futility of appeasing terror

Terrorism was born and has been abroad in the Middle East for decades, only now it is under an Islamic umbrella. Before there was Islamist terrorism, there was Palestinian terrorism. Of course, extremist Islam is a dimension of today's turmoil that cries out for reform.

How a very private actor inhabited his roles

Recently, actors Robert De Niro and Leonardo DiCaprio appeared in a short film titled "The Audition," both appearing as themselves auditioning for the same role in a movie to be directed by Martin Scorsese. "The Audition" is actually an advertisement for a luxury hotel and casino in Macau.