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Secretary of State John Kerry, center, and US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power, left, listen as President Barack Obama speaks during a bilateral meeting to discuss the Ebola epidemic with Ethiopian President Hailemariam Desalegn, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A coherent strategy for the Middle East

The latest strategy put forth by the Obama administration to combat the Islamic State jihadists not only changes weekly, but fails to address U.S. strategic core objectives in the Middle East. Most dubious is its reliance on so-called “moderate rebels” to provide a ground component to a U.S. air campaign.

Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare, one year later

As a doctor and congressman, I’m often asked what I prefer to be called. The answer for me is always doctor.

Illustration on U.S. reinvolvement against ISIS by Schot/De Volkskrant, Amsterdam, Netherlands

A Mideast policy rewritten in blood

The two most critical rules of warfare are to never tell your enemy what you will not do and to never be seen as a reluctant, vacillating warrior.

Illustration on Netanyahu's comment that ISIS and Hamas "are branches on the same poisonous tree" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The irony of endorsing Palestinians while bombing ISIS

Speaking to the United Nations General Assembly on Monday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu responded strongly to an earlier verbal attack launched by Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas.

FILE - This April 22, 2014, file photo shows an employment application form on a table during a job fair at Columbia-Greene Community College in Hudson, N.Y. The Labor Department releases its weekly report on applications for unemployment benefits on Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

Who are you calling the party of the rich?

The median American household saw its net worth decline by 36 percent during the Great Recession. That is a hard reality. A Republican held the White House when the crash hit, and voters, in no mood to be charitable, blamed the GOP. Besides, Democrats were ready with an explanation that slid right into an existing groove of American thinking: The financial crisis was caused by Republicans going easy on their big-banker friends.

Illustration on the value of the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Constitution, the great charter of liberty

When July 4 rolls around, there’s no mistaking it. There are fireworks, parades and other patriotic tributes to our Declaration of Independence. If you’re like most Americans, Sept. 17 comes and goes without any fanfare.

Illustration on climate, environmentalism and fuel supply by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Obama’s faulty climate-change solutions

President Obama boasted to the United Nations General Assembly last week that America is working hard to deal with what he called the “one issue that will define the contours of this century more dramatically than any other.”

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A poor way to fight poverty

It's been 50 years now since the federal government launched its "War on Poverty." But the numbers just released by the Census Bureau suggest we're in a losing battle.

Gen. James Conway            Associated Press photo

Obama's all-American show in Iraq

- The Washington Times

Several American presidents have had quarrels with their generals, sometimes for reluctance to take the fight to the enemy, occasionally for wanting to take too much fight to the foe.

A woman walks past an electronic board of a local bank showing the Hong Kong share index in Hong Kong Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014. Global stocks sank under the weight of worries about the possible timing of a U.S. rate hike, economic weakness in China and an impending referendum on Scottish independence. Hong Kong's Hang Seng fell 1.9 percent to 24,705.36. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

The long-run solution to an economic mess

Yes, the world is a mess — but there is a long-run solution. The solution is a world of modest-size governmental units — like Virginia and Switzerland, with no larger entity to bail them out if they make bad decisions.

Illustration on the consequences of political donor information disclosure laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The right to speak and be left alone

The best time to speak out about the policy issues you believe in is during the time of year when the most people are paying attention — the election season.

Illustration at the political hyping of AmeriCorps by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

AmeriCorps birthday bash baloney

President Obama and former President Bill Clinton were surrounded by a swarm of gray-shirted devotees Sept. 12 as they celebrated the 20th birthday of AmeriCorps on the South Lawn of the White House.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Before the First Shots'

Retired Marine Corps Gen. Tony Zinni is one of the most respected and experienced military officers that the United States has produced in recent memory. He offers some reflections in "Before the First Shots Are Fired," his latest book, on the sad state of American strategy and what might be done to fix it.

FILE - In this Nov. 23, 2011 file photo, an American flag flies from the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The federal government ran a lower budget deficit in August 2014 than a year ago, remaining on track to record the lowest deficit for the entire year since 2008. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Intelligence community ponders the 'immaculate collection'

- The Washington Times

"There’s no 'secret' version of the NIS. Our oversight committees, our partners, the public and, for that matter, even our adversaries are all seeing the very same strategic direction I'm giving to the Intelligence Community," says James R. Clapper, director of national intelligence - who also has thoughts on the current intel landscape.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Defeat of ISIS requires working with Syria

America suffers a profound lack of intellectual clarity in its policy regarding Syria. We are torn between the urgent need to halt the explosive growth of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and the desire of policymakers such as Hillary Clinton, John F. Kerry and John McCain, to vindicate their flawed Mideast strategy.