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Trig Dommer, 4, of Sioux Falls, checks out the voting booth next to his mom Naomi Dommer as she fills out her ballot during the South Dakota Primary Election, Tuesday, June 7, 2016, at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Sioux Falls, S.D. (Joe Ahlquist/Argus Leader via AP)

A suspicious wind in the rigging

- The Washington Times

There’s no such thing as voter fraud, as the Democrats and right-thinking press mavens have been telling us for weeks, but some curious things are happening out there in flyover country. Some of the assurances that all is well on the old ship of state have been caught in what looks suspiciously like the rigging.

Illustration for the 130th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty                The Washington Times

A monumental gift

Today is the 130th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty, a national monument that most Americans simply associate as a gift of the French people to honor the working of the two nations together during the American Revolution.

The Hillary Effect on Women Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s problem with women

Two weeks before the election, Hillary Clinton appears on track to win the presidency and become the first female commander in chief. She can credit her surge in the polls this last month to women — primarily her opponent’s offensive comments unearthed from a decade ago and the various accusations that have suddenly surfaced and have dominated the media.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets supporters following a "Get out the vote," rally at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016 in downtown Tampa, Fla. (Loren Elliot/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Hillary’s anti-transparency bargain

President Obama recently condemned the Republican Party, claiming that its “central principle” is to suppress voting. But, while his administration piously pledges to protect voting rights, it has almost guaranteed that Americans will be blindfolded on Election Day. While the Justice Department will deploy election monitors at polls in 25 states, no one watched Uncle Sam.

Illustration on NATO fiscal responsibility by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A threadbare alliance

Historians and political scientists commonly describe the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the most effective military alliance in contemporary history. It was the bond between the United States and Western Europe that helped contribute to the decline and eventual collapse of the Soviet Union.

Illustration on the 2016 campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Donald Trump is still the safer choice

America is a two-party system and after party conventions select the nominees, we have two choices and only two choices. Both nominees have demonstrated serious character flaws. The current spotlight is on lewd, vulgar comments from Donald Trump that cannot be defended. Nevertheless, his words could never be used to justify a vote for Hillary Clinton and her leftist agenda.

Donald Trump arrives at a Trump rally at Sanford Orlando International Airport in Sanford, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Trump is pledging to bolster the government's investment in the space program, a boon to the Space Coast of Florida. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

The staying power of populism

Despite evidence from the 2016 presidential campaign, doubts dominate about populism’s ability to win America’s ultimate prize. “It can’t happen here” is as wrong as the political establishment’s misreading of the populist movement itself. Populism’s history here and abroad argues a populist triumph could eventually occur — if not this November, then soon.

Missile Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran’s proxy missile attacks

The recent missile attacks attributed to Yemeni Houthi rebels, with assistance from the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and Hezbollah, demonstrate Iran’s classic use of proxies to promote its political agenda. The Houthi rebels denied any involvement in the missile attacks.

Illustration on non-voters by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of the nonvoter

Between now and Nov. 8, Americans will be inundated with good-intentioned public service announcements urging them to take the time to vote. And to buttress that argument, statistics about the usual low turnout rate — about 60 percent or so — will suggest that this American trend is somehow illustrative of a major defect in the body politic.

Related Articles

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton boards her campaign plane at Westchester County Airport in White Plains, N.Y., Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, to travel to Las Vegas for the third presidential debate. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

This time of crisis: Dems say everything is fine, but they are wrong

On a rare occasion, we Fox News contributors will visit programming off-campus. I did just that last Sunday as a guest on CBS News' "Face the Nation." Any time Donald Trump's candidacy is going to be discussed, you now have to presume it will be less about the issues, and more about the shiny distraction of "accusers" from Mr. Trump's past.

Clinton's terror ties

Out of concern for fighting terrorism in their nations and worldwide, political leaders from Egypt and Libya have a simple request: Keep Hillary Clinton out of the White House.

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal officially announces the end of his mandatory evacuation from Chatham County Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016, during a press conference at Signature Aviation. Residents were allowed back to their home till the beginning of curfew at 10PM Sunday. (Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News via AP)

Georgia's story of redemption

When I took office in January 2011, Georgia was in the midst of a criminal justice system crisis. The state's prison population and incarceration budget had doubled in the previous two decades and taxpayers were spending $1 billion per year to keep tens of thousands of inmates behind bars.

We are our own solutions

None of us will be 'freed' by a politician. However, a single vote can liberate a person. When we step alone into the voting booth in a few weeks, my hope is that we see at the bottom of our ballot, visible only to us, our own names. Why? Because our problems in this life, our true bondages, are in the mirror. If we will look at the mirror again, closely, we will see the solution to our problems.

Retooling Schools Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redefining American education to rekindle growth

Americans face daunting challenges beyond the apparent grasp of the principal contenders for president. Rekindling growth and creating enough good-paying jobs will require wholly rethinking how we educate and socialize young people for work.

Wary of how the press treats Donald Trump, Republicans have the least amount of trust in the media, a Gallup poll finds. (Associated press)

Polls all over the place

Nobody's any longer paying serious attention to "the issues," unless the Donald's sex tape and Hillary's felonies and misdemeanors qualify as issues. Hillary naturally gets a pass, either because the media has decided that her crimes are old news or, more likely, trashy behavior is what everyone now expects from the Clintons. Besides, what's wrong with trashy behavior?

Illustration on the potential trouble her husband's sexual history may yet cause Hillary Clinton's political aspirations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

And they call it puppy love

I am in jolly old London for a Spectator debate over America's presidential candidates, Donald Trump and What's Her Name. London is resplendent as ever, and my wife is patrolling my behavior lest I hazard our bank account by popping into Anderson & Sheppard to order another suit and seek psychiatric refreshment at this point in the election cycle.

Illustration on the Israeli/Palestinian conflict by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

A final stab at resolving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict

You're probably familiar with the old story about the inebriated guy looking for his wallet at night under a streetlight -- not because that's where he dropped it but because what would be the point of poking around in the dark? This, in essence, has been the American approach to resolving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict for years.

History of Media Bias in America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

America's tradition of media bias

Americans regularly decry media bias -- especially during elections. The truth, however, is that for the vast majority of American history, we have had biased media. The problem today is that it is so drastically one-sided that it is tipping election results.

In this June 28, 2016 photo, the Sheridan Press Child care provider Nancy Weaver holds Klayton Pearce as she keeps a toddler from pulling an object from a cubby hole at the Tongue River Child's Place in Ranchester, Wyo. Staff at the facility have been working with 4Kids on training as part of a pilot program. (Justin Sheely/Sheridan Press via AP)

It doesn't take a village

Raising children has never been more challenging. Just ask the new mother who drops off her crying six-week-old infant at a child care center, drying her tears, because she can't afford to stay home with her baby.

U.S. in the ISIS Crosshairs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary's Achilles' heel

Nov. 8 may very well go down in history as the day Americans signed our nation's death certificate. We the people need to understand what is at stake in the most important election in U.S. history

Illustration on the IRS under Hillary Clinton's presidency by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton's IRS -- a sneak preview

Imagine: What if the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) singled out hundreds of grassroots citizens groups across the nation and subjected them to ill treatment because of their political beliefs and values, mainly in opposition to the president of the United States?

BOOK REVIEW: 'Girl: My Childhood and the Second World War'

Reading this searing account of a hydra-headedly horrible childhood endured by Polish-born Israeli children's writer Alona Frankel reminds one just how complex that loaded term "Holocaust survivor" is. Mrs. Frankel's devastatingly frank autobiography has been compared to "The Diary of Anne Frank" and to the writings of Primo Levi, but, of course, they both were inmates of Auschwitz, a fate avoided by the eponymous "Girl."

Don't make victims pay twice

As a Beirut-campaign combat veteran and Oklahoma City bombing rescue volunteer, I understand well the heavy emotional and financial toll that acts of terror take on victims and their loved ones.

Pre-election discourse just drivel

In these times, one might desire the national pre-election dialogue to focus on the wise defense of our nation, the marshalling of tax dollars to actually repair or rebuild our infrastructure, the strengthening of our borders and the overhauling of our education system, which is infested by teachers' unions and politically correct curricula.

A young boy tags along at a voting booth as early voting beings at the Hamilton County Board of Elections, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

All voters matter

The Democrats, who imagine they have the franchise on ethics in politics, have argued for years that there's no such thing as voter fraud, and anyone who says that such wickedness exists is a racist in a small closet who ventures out from time to time to keep minority voters, i.e., blacks, from voting.

Hillary, Donald and the greater good

The 2016 presidential election season has not been kind to values voters. It's hard to imagine how America can recapture its place as "a shining city on hill" when most campaign coverage is about sex, lies and videotape. Values voters may be tempted to tune out in disgust and stay home on Election Day, but they have an obligation to weigh necessity against their wishes.

Illustration on the influence of Vladimir Putin on Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Russian enigma and the U.S. election

Does Vladimir Putin want Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump to win the presidency? Those supporting Hillary claim that Mr. Putin wants Mr. Trump to win, and they claim that is why WikiLeaks is putting out the Hillary emails and speeches.