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Illustration on the decline of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the FBI is hard to trust

- The Washington Times

Can anyone with a modicum of common sense trust the Federal Bureau of investigation? The answer to that question is a resounding “no.” The claim that the FBI strives to be above politics is today and has always been absurd. When former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover admitted in an interview that his “agents” had tapped the phones of 1964 Republican candidate Barry Goldwater and even bugged his campaign plane, Mr. Hoover told his interviewer, who wondered how someone in his position could so cavalierly ignore the law and the constitutional rights of American citizens, that when the president asks you deliver.

ACLU Legal and Policy director Rebecca Robertson talks during a news conference held by opponents of a "bathroom bill" at the Texas State Capitol, Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Austin, Texas. The Texas House is considering a bill that's different than one that sparked outcry when it cleared the state Senate last month. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

The ACLU goes hunting in Montana

In a 1981 speech before the California Peace Officers Assn., former Attorney General Ed Meese referred to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) as a “criminals’ lobby.”

Illustration on the need to deplot THAAD by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The folly of putting protection on ice

North Korea rarely misses an opportunity to threaten or provoke us. It does so most often with the launching of one or more ballistic missiles accompanied by a harangue that the missiles would soon be launched at us armed with nuclear weapons.

Illustration on the real situation of Cuba by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the new Cuba policy misses the mark

President Donald Trump announced his Cuba policy in Miami last week. I commend him for many of his efforts. He unveiled a replacement policy for the disastrous Cuba policy President Obama put into place. The highlight of Mr. Obama’s policy was lifting an economic embargo that was placed after the Communist revolution of Fidel Castro brought the world to the brink of nuclear war with the Missile Crisis in 1962.

The Illinois Shop of Horrors Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Banana Republic of Illinois

The media has hyper-obsessed over the Kansas tax hike this year and has sold this as a repudiation of “supply side economics.” But the real story in the states has been the catastrophic effects of “tax and spend” fiscal policy in Illinois.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The party’s over and no place to call home

- The Washington Times

That’s the dilemma of the Democrats, forlorn, despondent and walking in circles like the goose hit on the head with a long-handled wooden spoon. They’re asking questions for which there are no happy answers in the wake of their fourth straight loss in a round of special elections.

Illustration of Anne Morgan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Anne Morgan, an American Hero

The United States was finally in “the war to end all wars.” France had been ravaged since the summer of 1914. Villages and towns were obliterated. Women and children went hungry and homeless as the armies wrestled in futile combat in mud, blood and indescribable filth and disease. The British lost 20,000 dead in a single day at the Battle of the Somme.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn’t your insurance talking. It’s doctoring. It’s nursing. It’s medical technology. It’s your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can’t prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn’t do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.

Illustration on the devaluation of U.S. bonds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uncle Sam’s F-rated bonds

Were the United States any other country, its bonds would have long ago been downgraded to junk.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times

The thing people like about House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is that he is a serious guy who is capable of thinking big and has an ambitious agenda to salvage our ungovernable federal bureaucracy.

Photojournalist Shay Horse said he was pepper-sprayed while covering protests at the Jan. 21 presidential inauguration, even though his camera identified him as a journalist. (Sarah Nelson / The Washington Times)

Is ACLU lawsuit against D.C. cops a red herring?

- The Washington Times

“An officer told us to drop our pants,” Shay Horse said. “An officer went down the row telling each of us not to flinch as he grabbed our balls and yanked on them, and then stuck his finger up each of our anuses and wiggled it around. I felt like they were using molestation and rape as punishment.”

Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

Related Articles

U.S. still "shining city upon a hill"

The world is dying before our eyes as the forces of darkness and light collide on a daily basis. We have state-sponsored terrorism coming from countries such as Iran, North Korea and Syria. Behind closed doors Russia and China plot to bring chaos and death to humanity while pretending, publicly, they are for peace.

FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2012, file photo, a Sacramento police officer makes a traffic stop in Sacramento, Calif. State lawmakers are considering a proposal that would outlaw suspending a driver's license as a penalty for not paying traffic fines. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Some of our cruisers are missing

No good deed goes unpunished, as the folk saying goes, and the Los Angeles Police Department has solved the mystery of what happened to three of their police cruisers. Three teenage cadets, 15, 16 and 17 years old, saw an opportunity for a joy ride, and took it.

Joy Miller of Boulder, Colo., holds up a placard during a protest against the polices of President Donald Trump Saturday, June 3, 2017, in downtown Denver. More than 300 people were on hand for the anti-Trump rally, which featured speakers calling for resistance to the administration. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

A biblical truth about leftist evil

- The Washington Times

America, in case it's escaped your notice, has been mired in an atmosphere of political animosity and violence -- violence that finally led a crazed anti-President Donald Trumper to take up arms and shoot to kill at a Republican congressional baseball team practice in Alexandria, Virginia. It's the sort of

Illustration on stopping the rise of the national debt ceiling by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Congress must not raise the debt ceiling

Growing up in Eisenhower's America, my parents spent their summers preoccupied with beach vacations and baseball pennant races -- both a welcome relief from the tough tasks of earning a living and raising children. This summer we get to obsess about whether the federal government will run out of money.

Illustration on the Honeymooners by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Honoring dad on Father's Day

This will be the first Father's Day that I won't be able to talk to my dad by phone or in person. He died at the ripe old age of 94 back in February. Wish you could have known him.

FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III was named as special counsel to oversee the ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. (AP file) ** FILE **

The lawyer finds a permanent client

- The Washington Times

Every lawyer has a bit of the ambulance-chaser lurking deep in his heart, and dreams of one day landing a permanent client. Even a lawyer as distinguished, as ethical, as high-minded, as above all reproach and as disdainful of personal glory and profit as a special prosecutor.

Paying politicians to run for office

When politicians face a problem, their first instinct is often to spend your tax dollars. Those who see our politics itself as a problem are no exception. Figures like Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts Democrat, and former Vice President Joe Biden say politicians should receive public funds to run their campaigns.

Illustration on resisting being goaded into a like reaction to attacks on the GOP by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

After the attack in Alexandria

- The Washington Times

Conservatives will be tempted in the days ahead to blame the left's over the top anti-Republican, anti-Trump rhetoric for the shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise and the others wounded in Alexandria on Wednesday. It will be tempting both because leftist leaders have thrown all decency aside as they vent against those with whom they disagree and because in the hours following the shootings Twitter was awash with messages emanating from the progressive fever swamps celebrating the shootings because Republicans "deserve" whatever they get.

Memories of a simpler time

What you have more of than anything else as you reach old age are memories. Back in the 1930s, the Depression years, my family lived in Cottage City, Maryland. Nobody in the neighborhood locked their doors. My mother and father worked, and we three children were in school during the day. We had a telephone, a party line, so if a neighbor who did not have a phone needed to make a call, they were free to do so on ours.

The dynamics of Irish-American family life

"Saints for All Occasions tells the stories of the Flynn sisters: Nora and Theresa, who leave their home in Ireland to settle in Boston in 1958. Theresa is the adventurous one; Nora is the older, shy, responsible one. She's engaged to Charlie Rafferty, who is already in Boston.

Military purpose defense, not equality

This absurd policy of accepting transgender individuals into the armed forces of the United States must be terminated. Good order and discipline within the ranks, plus respect and trust among the troops, are absolute requirements for an effective and viable military-command structure. The presence of transgender individuals in the ranks debases this efficiency ("Pentagon continues LGBT pride celebration; conservatives say it's a shame in Trump administration," Web, June 11).

Members of the Weapons Operations Division Salute Battery fire howitzers during a Change of Command ceremony at YPG, 25 miles north of Yuma, Ariz., Thursday, June 15, 2017. Matthews replaces outgoing YTC commander Lt. Col. James DeBoer. Yuma Proving Ground is a U.S. Army facility and one of the largest military installations in the world. (Randy Hoeft/The Yuma Sun via AP)

Ensuring military readiness

The first and only mission of an army is to defend the nation. The uncertainty that accompanies the warrior to battle will not be relieved by supplying additional distractions. That's why Secretary of Defense James Mattis must resist the voices urging him to endorse a policy to enable the "transgendered" to serve openly in the U.S. armed forces. "The fog of war," as von Clausewitz called it, will only thicken if the ranks are filled with men and women trying to deal with confusion over whether they're male or female.

Farewell to the valedictorians

It's commencement time at high schools across the fruited plain, and either the kids in Rutherford County, Tenn., are extraordinarily smart or their teachers have given up. The county's highly ranked Central Magnet School has 48 valedictorians -- a fourth of the class.

A gunman shot at lawmakers during a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia, Wednesday. Rep. Steve Scalise was injured in the attack. (Associated Press)

Shooting exposes the deep anger at the heart of the culture

The shooting of a senior GOP congressional leader, Hill staffers and Capitol police officers is a sober reminder of how deeply anger and division have penetrated our politics and our culture. We are forgetting the basics, failing to foster civility and respect for one another in America. Both political parties need to take inventory on how to restore civility in our nation and calm the political tension.