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(Photo courtesy of The White House)

The surging truth-tellers of the GOP

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is surging in New Hampshire, and Chris Christie’s back on the hunt, sounding like a born-again contender. They’re both long shots — the Donald is off the board — but they’re making the kind of noise the wiseheads say they can’t make.

Members of left wing parties hold placards reading in Greek ''NO'' next to a Presidential Guard, Evzonas, during a protest outside the Greek Parliament in Athens, Sunday, June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says the Bank of Greece has recommended that banks remain closed and restrictions be imposed on transactions, after the European Central Bank didn't increase the amount of emergency liquidity the lenders can access from the central bank. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

The Greeks should vote “no!”

Voting “no” offers Greeks some prospects for better solutions, whereas voting “yes” guarantees penury.

Illustration on the uncontrolled growth of Federal banking regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The squeeze of regulatory kudzu

It is called the vine that ate the South. Kudzu was first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia as an ornamental plant for home gardens. It pretty much stayed that way for half a century, until the federal government got involved. The Roosevelt administration decided that kudzu would be helpful against soil erosion and made it a mission of the Soil Erosion Service to plant kudzu all across the South. Now kudzu covers 12,000 square miles. Kudzu is estimated to smother another 150,000 acres each year.

Energy Independence Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A declaration of energy independence

The United States is closer than ever before to fulfilling the vision of our Founding Fathers. By achieving energy independence, we can achieve freedom from foreign influence.

Fireworks Warning Label Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The sticky legalisms of wacky warning labels

Not too long ago, common sense ruled the day, so called because it was shared by nearly everybody. Common values, commonly understood sense of right and wrong, just and unjust, all expressed in a common language of fairness.

Illustration on raising the minimum wage in light of its effect on Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Puerto Rico’s minimum-wage object lesson

A report released by the Puerto Rican government this week fingers the territory’s minimum wage as a prime factor in its emerging debt crisis. Though its economy is significantly less developed than even the poorest American states, it is still subject to the federal $7.25 minimum wage, 77 percent of its median wage. This high wage floor acts as a significant employment barrier, contributing to the island’s pathetic 43 percent labor force participation rate and its economic stagnation in general.

Illustration on lower-cost tailored television choices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

TV with a choice

Question: What do rabid football fans, working moms and Clifford the Big Red Dog viewers have in common?

Meaningful Tax Cut Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rand Paul’s ‘fair and flat’ tax proposal

Sen. Rand Paul’s flat tax plan is like a decent song in a world full of off-key voices. It hits all the right notes, including greater simplicity, lower rates for everyone, and a more competitive system of corporate taxation. But it has some small details that could use fine tuning.

Sen. Bernard Sanders, a Vermont independent who caucuses with the Democrats, is focusing on wealth disparity.

Bernie’s surge

If you Google Bernie Sanders, some surprising poll numbers will appear, showing the rumpled, self-described socialist gaining fast on Hillary Clinton in the race for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.

Illustration on the shifting meaning of marriage in modern society by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The same-sex factor in ‘freedom from marriage’

Ross Douthat of The New York Times produced what is perhaps the most penetrating piece on the Supreme Court’s ruling last week on gay marriage. He notes that, long before the debate on that subject gained traction in U.S. politics, gay intellectuals carried on their own debate about marriage and how the gay community should view that venerable human institution.

Illustration on the imposition of Common Core on U.S. schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending Washington’s mandate on Common Core

The United States Senate will soon begin debate on a bill to get the federal government out of our local classrooms by permanently ending Washington’s mandate on Common Core.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Shutter the Ex-Im Bank—for good

Reauthorizing Ex-Im would be a step backwards at the time when our economy needs to move forward.

Related Articles

Flag removal would be insult

Like "political correctness," demanding the removal of the Confederate flag from the South Carolina capitol grounds is an attack on free speech "Lindsey Graham, Nikki Haley, Tim Scott call for removal of Confederate flag from S.C. capitol," Web, June 22).

Individuals, not things, kill

After any tragedy it has become the norm for society to place the blame on some aspect that they may have control over. In the case of the murders of nine black parishioners in South Carolina, the blame is being placed on the Confederate flag. It's as if many think that if the Confederate flag hadn't been around, this murderous act would not have happened.

FILE - In this April 11, 2015, file photo, US President Barack Obama, right, smiles as he looks over towards Cuban President Raul Castro, left, during their meeting at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama. On Decmeber 17, 2014, Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro stunned the world by announcing an end to their nations’ half-century of official hostility. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Saving the dictators

The Obama administration has been holding high-level talks with the Venezuelan dictatorship, this time in Haiti of all places, and that makes prudent men and women nervous. Washington's moral compass -- or whatever they're using for one at the White House -- has been spinning as if out of control, and pointing in odd directions.

FILE - In this May 26, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks in Elizabethtown Ky.  President Barack Obama's trade agenda appears to be back on track after an extraordinary bipartisan rescue operation mounted in the week since it was derailed in the House by rebellious Democrats backed by organized labor. "We are committed to ensuring both ... get votes in the House and Senate and are sent to the president for signature," House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a joint statement issued Wednesday in an attempt to reassure pro-trade Democrats whose votes will be needed.  (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

When enough is enough

When the legislation granting "fast track" authority to the president to negotiate a trans-Pacific trade agreement moved toward an initial Senate vote earlier this year, we warily urged Republicans to suck it up and vote for it. No president can negotiate a broad trade agreement without such authority. Anyone who thinks such agreements, properly negotiated and correctly written, aren't to the benefit of the United States understands neither economics nor history.

Less Inmates in the Slammer Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Who's behind bars?

The verdict is in, and it's close to unanimous: The United States has built too many prisons.

Marchers walk up Charleston's main bridge to meet in the middle in a show of unity after nine black church parishioners were gunned down during a Bible study, Sunday, June 21, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

A powerful antidote to racism

Once again, our nation has been deeply wounded by a hateful, racist attack -- this time by a white gunman who murdered nine black, Bible study worshipers in a church in Charleston, S.C.

Richard Nixon           Portrait by Norman Rockwell/Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery

The unseen human side of Richard Nixon

When Richard Nixon was president, he often complained to aides that the press did not understand his warm and generous side. His chief of staff, H.R. "Bob" Haldeman, dutifully appointed "anecdotalists," members of the staff designated to collect heart-warming stories about the chief executive to be parceled out to the press. The program was a flop. The stories were hokey and even lazy reporters by and large refused to print them.

Donald Trump announcing his candidacy for President of the United States

New faces in the race

The Republican Party, the political party of commerce (and of jobs), has two aspiring candidates for the presidential nomination who are drawn from the business community -- one who evokes unwarranted snoozes, the other who rather astonishingly evokes derision.

Illustration on the limitations of surgical strikes against Islamist terrorists by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Defeating violent extremism: How we're doing it wrong

The Obama administration is hailing the death of Nasser al-Wuhayshi, leader of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, as a major blow to that organization. The United States targeted and killed this notorious leader in Yemen with yet another drone strike.

A peevish professor questions the faith of our fathers

It was the first day of school in September of 1954 and something had changed. As a 10-year-old student at Washington's John Eaton Elementary School, I was about to join my classmates in the morning Pledge of Allegiance when our fifth grade teacher, Miss Parsons, announced that two new words had been added to the pledge. Henceforward, the America referred to in the pledge would be one nation "under God." Most of us -- probably including Miss Parsons -- had assumed that that was what our country always had been.

President Obama will welcome Xi Jinping in September for the first official state visit by the Chinese president. The White House says the administration considers China to be an "important participant" in nuclear negotiations with Iran. (Associated Press)

Taming the hungry dragon

Secretary of State John Kerry and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew sat down Monday with their Chinese counterparts at an annual meeting, as prescribed in an agreement made in 2009, to talk about bilateral co-operation in their relations. They meet this year amid growing differences. The transformation of the Chinese regime is a new worrying element in that relationship.

Advancing America's national security

As the leadership of the United States Army has become intensely intellectualized in recent decades, Gen. John R. "Jack" Galvin gained a deserved reputation as one of the "brainiest generals" ever to don a uniform.

Illustration on the death of comedy on politically correct college campuses by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The empty 'marketplace of ideas'

Americans take justifiable pride in their right to free speech. People may be muzzled by their government in places such as Cuba and North Korea, but not here. You can say what's on your mind without fear of prosecution.

No 'free' in free trade

All this talk about "free trade" might make an uninformed person believe that opening up trade with foreign companies will result in free trade for American businesses and workers. Nothing could be further from the truth.

CARE Hands Groping for Cash Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Zombie charities push population control

As a conservative, I don't have much use for foreign aid, preferring to support private charitable efforts overseas. But when Washington politicians began to dole out huge sums of money several decades ago, existing nonprofits lined up for their share of the take.

Resist reactive measures

Thoughts are with the victims of last week's South Carolina church shooting. Unfortunately, the left again pushes for divisive, ineffective gun control instead of addressing the root causes of the problem.

Illustration on the coming epidemic of Mexican drugs into the U.S. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama's coming epidemic of drugs

When he assumed office in 2009, President Obama inherited a drug policy success of unprecedented dimensions. Cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, marijuana, and misused opiate prescriptions were all under control or declining. The drug threat, especially for youth, was substantially smaller. That tide of achievement is now reversing.