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Illustration on dealing with the rise of violent Shariaists in the U.S. after the demise of the ISIS caliphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fending off ISIS and Shariah

Do I detect a note of desperation in how some of my fellow Americans discuss how to treat terrorism, specifically the Islamic State, or ISIS? ISIS has grown from a small group of brutes back in President Obama’s time committing various heinous crimes into a small army consisting of a few thousand, perhaps tens of thousands committing heinous crimes.

Illustration on the thought of Michael Lind by Linus Garsys/The Washington Times

A new role for America

If you’re puzzled by the swirl of geopolitical forces besetting the globe, and the debates unleashed by that swirl as to the nature of the world we will inherit or should inherit, then you must read Michael Lind’s cover article in the current issue of The National Interest.

Democrats New Hobby Horse Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ sudden concern for election integrity

When the Democratic Party and its deep-state allies’ favorite anti-Trump columnist begins to sour on the promise of a Russian collusion probe, it is time to start looking for a consolation prize. Based on the overnight interest in all things voting security, they seem to have found a new hobby horse.

Intrusive Government Data Collection Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Supreme Court call on the third party doctrine

This week, constitutional law experts and the law enforcement community were abuzz after the U.S. Supreme Court added Carpenter v. United States to its docket, a case that could reshape government data collection and the Fourth Amendment in the internet Age.

Tax Cutm Legislation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tax reform for the real world

There is an old adage that entrepreneurs often find to be true, and that is that things take three times as long and cost three times as you much as you thought. The Republicans claim they are going to get tax reform done this year — but this is not going to happen unless they do two necessary things.

People visit the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 26, 2017, as justices issued their final rulings for the term, in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Religious rights rest in clutches of the Supreme Court

- The Washington Times

The Supreme Court of the United States agreed this week to consider whether a Denver baker violated the constitutional and civil rights of a gay couple by refusing to sell the two guys a wedding cake. Let’s hope the court sides with religious freedom on this, not special rights.

Illustration on duplication in government programs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unhealthy acts

Is there anyone who can point to the “Affordable Care Act” (aka Obamacare) and credibly claim it is accomplishing the goals set for it seven years ago?

Illustration on energy week by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Paving the path to U.S. energy dominance

This week, the Trump administration is hosting “Energy Week” to discuss with state, tribal, business and labor leaders how we can pave the path forward toward U.S. energy dominance.

In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017, photo, Hannah Waring, left, a student at Loudoun Valley High School, and Abby McDonough, a student at Liberty University, work in the strawberry stand at Wegmeyer Farms in Hamilton, Va. Waring and McDonough are working at Wegmeyer Farms for the summer. Summer jobs are vanishing as U.S. teens spend more time in school and face competition from older workers. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A summer bummer for young job-seekers

On July 1, 17 states and localities will make a difficult youth summer job market even worse by raising their starter wages. These raises follow the 42 separate wage hikes that took place on New Year’s Day.

Illustration on the history of American secret operations by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

A constant craving for intelligence

This summer marks the 40th anniversary of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, one of the first achievements of Democratic House Speaker Thomas “Tip” O’Neill in his newly elected post in 1977.

Witch Hunt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An investigation in search of a crime

How is this for a strategy? Concoct a conspiracy to explain an unexpected election loss, put a cloud over the head of the elected president and his agenda, drag out an investigation for months, stir up hopes of impeachment, and then charge obstruction of justice when the subject of the mudslinging attempts to clear his name.

Illustration on the decline of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the FBI is hard to trust

- The Washington Times

Can anyone with a modicum of common sense trust the Federal Bureau of investigation? The answer to that question is a resounding “no.” The claim that the FBI strives to be above politics is today and has always been absurd.

Related Articles

Illustration on the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The tragic Bolshevik legacy, 100 years on

This year marks 100 years since the Bolshevik Revolution took place in Russia. That year, the centuries-old czardom of Russia and the brief liberal democracy that replaced it collapsed and was soon replaced by the Soviet Union, the world's first stable communist state.

Illustration on the virtues of Kurdish independence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for Kurdish independence

On Sept. 25, Kurdistan will hold a referendum for independence. For a number of reasons, the United States should welcome this development and support the referendum.

Illustration on the history of the Department of Justice by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A tortuous start for Justice

If you think the Department of Justice is grabbing the headlines these days, on June 22, 1870, the news was even bigger. Congress seemingly remedied the federal government's legal shortcomings that day when it created the department.

Pelosi needs reality check

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has once again demonstrated an unbridled level of buffoonery. Her recent proclamation that the hateful and violent incidents we see today can be traced back to the 1990s during the Clinton administration and the attacks by conservatives and Republicans on Bill and Hillary is simply ludicrous and unfounded ("Pelosi: 'Outrageous' for Republicans to blame Democrats for heated rhetoric," Web, June 15).

Immigrants infuse U.S. with life

Is America still the last, best hope for mankind? That status could have slipped some on our watch (see Iraq, deficit spending). And we have been a bit stupid (see Citizens United, concealed carry, extended ammo clips). Well, our nation was founded on money and violence (see slavery, native genocide). But remember also the Civil War, women's suffrage, civil rights and gay rights, and remember America's extraordinary labor-saving and

Justice for Otto Warmbier

I can only hope that retribution for the egregious death of Otto Warmbier is swift and sure. This horrible tragedy resulted from no more than a college prank, leading to the death of a vibrant, loving and intelligent young man. I can only imagine the suffering endured by his family, and was brought to tears by their description of the peace that had come over his face, even when he was in a coma, as he realized that at last he was home.

Life of the complex celebrity crime maven

The notion of Americans reinventing themselves has become such a well-worn trope -- even among cliches -- that one is hesitant to use it. I can never forget that self-appointed cultural arbiter, the late Susan Sontag, using it over and over again to explain what her novel chronicling the California life of Polish actress Helena Modjeska "In America" was about.

FILE - In this June 13, 2013 file photo, then-FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trumps closest allies are attacking the integrity of those involved in the widening probe of Russian interference in the U.S. election, accusing special counsel Mueller of driving a biased investigation. And Trump himself took aim at the senior Justice Department official responsible for appointing Mueller, accusing him on Twitter of leading a Witch Hunt.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

No stacking the deck

Robert Mueller III has always got high marks for probity, integrity and honesty, but as a Washington lawyer of considerable talent he should know that sometimes it's the perception that counts most. Mr. Mueller is asking a skeptical capital to take too much on faith.

FILE - In this June 13, 2017 file photo, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. speaks at Republican National Committee Headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Liberal groups resistant to Republican policies say they have no plans to change their tactics or approach after a gunman apparently driven by his hatred of President Donald Trump opened fire at a GOP baseball practice, grievously injuring a top Republican congressman and several others. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Sitting ducks in Congress

Sitting members of Congress should not be sitting ducks. Last week's shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise and several Republican staff members at a baseball field in suburban Washington revealed them to be exactly that. They can thank the District of Columbia's excessive and spiteful firearms restrictions. Laws hindering their ability to carry a concealed weapon should be relaxed to enable members of Congress and other law-abiding Washingtonians to protect themselves.

In this image from Senate Television video, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pauses as he speaks Wednesday, June 14, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Washington, about the shooting at the Republican congressional baseball practice.  (Senate Television via AP) **FILE**

Bern victims pile up in Democratic Party

- The Washington Times

If the anti-Trump fever the media keeps telling us all about cannot break through in Georgia's 6th District, then it truly is nothing but a phantom that exists nowhere but in the minds of media elites hysterically trying to will President Trump out of existence.

Illustration on responding to political rage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why so much rage?

That didn't take long. Less than 48 hours after the shooting rampage targeting Republican members of Congress and their staff on a baseball field in Alexandria, Va., followed by the picture of Republicans and Democrats kneeling in prayer at Nationals Park before their annual charity game, things returned to normal or abnormal.

Illustration on the faults of the NIEHS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chemical scaremongering

It's great news the Trump administration is starting to dismantle the junk science life-support system for government overregulation. Budget cuts at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and reforms of science advisory panels at the Department of Interior and EPA, stir hope the agencies' longstanding reigns of terror via "science" may come to an end.

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2014, file photo, protesters participate in a rally on Chicago's south side as labor organizers escalate their campaign raise the minimum wage for employees to $15 an hour. Amid a national push by unions and worker advocates for a $15 minimum wage, Illinois Democrats hope to pass an ambitious hike during the spring legislative session, despite a warning from Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner that he opposes an increase of any kind. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

Curtains for union coercion

In 1947 organized labor spent today's equivalent of $11 million opposing the Slave Labor Act. The act is better known today as Taft-Hartley. Despite the union's rant, it was designed to provide protection against abusive and often violent labor unions. Now on the 70th anniversary of that law, Congress is again poised to realign employment relationships free from coercive union pressures.

Illustration on the excessive costs of scientific research by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The high overhead of scientific research

Last year American taxpayers spent more than $42 billion for scientific research and education at universities and nonprofits across the country. Most of this investment contributed to American innovation, economic competitiveness and national security.