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Illustration on the truth about gun control by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Why gun control is a loser for the Democrats

There is nothing so comforting as a closely held prejudice, even when it repeatedly harms you. The white-hot passion of Democratic politicians to restrict and even strip Americans of their constitutionally guaranteed right to buy, own, keep, shoot and carry firearms continues as a monument to self-abuse.

U.N. Policies on Global Warming Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The politics behind the anti-fossil fuels campaign

History shows Earth’s climate goes through cycles, long and short, tied to a variety of natural factors. In the latter part of the 20th century, some scientists began to wonder about the causes of a modest warming, then cooling, then warming, which had been occurring since the mid-1800s. They also began to worry about the possible implications of continued warming.

After a speech at the Illinois State Capitol, President Barack Obama stops at the Hoogland Center for the Arts in Springfield, Ill.(Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Obama is no incompetent

While he was mocked for his performance in the last debate and had a disappointing showing in New Hampshire, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said what none of his rivals are willing to admit: “Let’s dispel [sic] with the fiction that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing. He knows exactly what he’s doing. He is trying to change this country” — with astonishing success.

Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Illustration on the relationship between Hillary Clinton and Goldman Sachs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pinned to Wall Street

When Goldman Sachs, the powerful, multibillion-dollar Wall Street investment bank, offered Hillary Clinton $675,000 for three speeches, she readily accepted.

Spiro Agnew Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Spiro Agnew shaped Republican rhetoric

Spiro Agnew today is what he characterized himself as in 1968. Richard Nixon tapped the unknown governor of Maryland to be his Republican vice presidential running mate: “not exactly a household word.”

Duplicitous attacks on the Maldives

It is a compelling tale. A longtime political activist leads his party to victory in a closely fought election in a country famed for its pristine archipelagos and on the front of the war against climate change. There is no doubt that Mohamed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, was adept at using the international media to promote his agenda while in government.

A student teacher in the second-grade classroom of teacher Susanne Diaz at Marcus Whitman Elementary School, goes over lessons with students, in Richland, Wash. (Ty Beaver/The Tri-City Herald via AP)

Let no child be left unconfused

- The Washington Times

Mae West, the famous philosopher of the boudoir, would hardly believe her fortune today. “So many men,” she once complained, “so little time.” She was the kind of girl who set out to “climb the ladder of success, wrong by wrong.”

Illustrations on Christians and Yazidis in Syria and Iraq by Lians Garsys/The Washington Times

Forsaken for their faith

It’s now a couple of weeks of news cycles since we learned from satellite imagery that the Islamic State had destroyed the monastery of St. Elijah, which for more than 11 centuries served as a spiritual oasis for the promulgation of Christianity in the Middle East.

Cost of Ethanol on the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Renewable Fuel Standard deceit

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants Americans to pay more for their groceries. That’s the only way to explain the agency’s decision to mandate the use of corn-based ethanol in our gas supply.

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Islamic Relief provides needed aid

The picture of Islamic Relief Worldwide painted by Kyle Shideler in "Funding terrorists must end" (Web, Nov. 29) is riddled with inaccuracies. It undermines the good name of an organization trusted by governments, U.N. agencies and hundreds of thousands of donors to deliver life-saving aid around the world.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a question from a member of the audience during a campaign event at the Knoxville School District Administration Office, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, in Knoxville, Iowa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The election when nobody showed up

- The Washington Times

Why are the front-runners in both parties so unelectable? The frenzied and the frightened count the ways, without getting into the depth and breadth and height a body's soul can reach.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Unspeakable Things'

By definition you cannot speak about unspeakable things, so writing about them in a novel called "Unspeakable Things" presents significant problems. Author Kathleen Spivack solves these by letting some things get lost in the haze of time, while obscuring others behind the curtains and closed doors that are so common in this novel. Some scenes she merely sketches, but others appear in brilliant color: vivid, entertaining, and often quite frightening.

Illustration on new recognition of Drone pilots and remote control combat contributions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'R' is for respect

Ever since David felled Goliath with a slingshot, militaries have sought to deal death from a distance. Whereas David's ingenuity earned him accolades, rank, and ultimately the throne, his successors in asymmetric warfare are often derided for their physical remove from the battlefield.

Illustration on supply, demand and costs in U. S. healthcare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why health insurance premiums are rising

We shouldn't be surprised that health insurance premiums continue to rise at record rates — by 15-20 percent for many employers and their employees in 2016 alone. Between private insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, the number of insured Americans has grown dramatically to nearly 90 percent of the population.

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2015 file photo, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, right, makes a point as Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas listens on during the Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas. Ted Cruz once proudly wore a belt buckle reading “President of the United States” borrowed from George H.W. Bush. He campaigned and worked for, and helped write a book lavishing praise on, that former president’s son, Dubya. And the endorsement of George P. Bush, the family’s latest rising political star, lent credibility to Cruz’s then little-known 2012 Senate campaign. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

How to fix the debates

Donald Trump has a knack for drawing attention to a problem, but rarely has a way to fix it. He has done that again, largely by accident, with his row with Fox News over the Republican debates.

In this Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 photo, Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party, DPP, presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen raises her hand as she declares victory in the presidential election, in Taipei, Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana, FIle)

Good news from Taiwan

The Republic of China (Taiwan) has become an economic powerhouse, the fifth largest in Asia and in the top 20 in the world, and even more important, its political institutions are stable. Real growth has averaged about 8 percent over the past three decades. The older labor-intensive industries have steadily moved elsewhere, replaced by technology-intensive industries.

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during a campaign event at Heartland Acres Agribition Center, on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, in Independence, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

In America, faith matters

The presidential candidates have been talking about God lately, which is understandable because most of them haven't a prayer of being elected.

Our Moral Compass on Syria Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Say it's not so

Is this the United States of America that continuously defers to Russia and Iran, and thereby to the Syria of Bashar al Assad? Do our own actions and words enable one of the most murderous and cruel, destructive and destabilizing, regimes the world has ever seen? Have we so lost our strategic sense and moral compass that we knowingly repeat policies that have made war and atrocities in Syria worse?

Syrians struggle to get pillows and blankets distributed at a camp for displaced civilians, in the village of Atmeh, Syria. Other Syrians have escaped the conflict by going to neighboring countries, taxing the ability of those nations and international relief agencies to help them. "In terms of the overall numbers, it is very clear the region is facing a humanitarian disaster that is deepening by the day," said Sharon Waxman, of the International Rescue Committee's Commission on Syrian Refugees. (Associated Press)

Islamic Relief: A humanitarian organization dedicated to saving lives

Over the past twenty years, Muslim organizations have played an increasingly prominent role in the delivery of international humanitarian aid. Their growth has been underpinned by the striking generosity of growing Muslim communities in North America and Europe and by zakat - the religious obligation to give 2.5% of disposable income to charity.

Illustration on Ted Cruz in Iowa by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Predicting Iowa

- The Washington Times

The snowstorm that hit the Washington area last week gave the State Department yet another reason to delay releasing a tranche of embarrassing Hillary Clinton emails, ensnared President Obama's motorcade in the rush-hour disaster that turned half-hour commutes into three-hour nightmares, and revealed how unprepared area governments were to deal with weather they knew full well was on its way.

Illustration contrasting storm gallantry and leftist government dependency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sometimes it's a blizzard, but never a snow job

NEW YORK CITY -- It's a strange time to be in a blizzard in the birthplace of "New York values." The wind howls through the canyons of commerce like a wolf at full moon, and for a change the noise is from nature and not from the politicians. The blinding whiteout clears the mind to focus on what's at hand, and what requires a helping hand.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Triumph of Faith: Why the World is More Religious than Ever'

In "The Triumph of Faith: Why the World is More Religious than Ever," Rodney Stark challenges the popular notion that the world is becoming increasingly secular. Marshalling ample facts and figures, Mr. Stark, who serves as distinguished professor of the social sciences at Baylor University, dismantles what "everyone knows" in the "confines of the faculty lounge."

Media right on Trump Liberty flap

Charles Hurt's criticisms of the media coverage of Donald Trump's most recent publicized incident completely miss the point ("Donald Trump's Corinthians misquote overblown by media," Web, Jan. 19). Mr. Hurt expounds on the reasons that conservative evangelicals support Mr. Trump, attributing it to the fact that like Mr. Trump, they are politically incorrect people living in a society that directly opposes or demonizes the ideals for which they stand.

The grim news comes with less than a year left for President Obama to put the Affordable Care Act on firmer footing as he seeks to head off what is likely to be a last effort at repealing the act after November's elections. (Associated Press)

Obama's not-so-hot report card

Not everyone can win a popularity contest, which is why not everybody can be the president. As difficult as winning may be, staying in the good graces of the electorate is even more difficult. Seven years after climbing to the top of the heap, public-opinion has put President Obama in his rightful place: well below average. The judgment of his countrymen can be cruel, but it happens to every president.

For Fox News, Donald Trump's absence could be disastrous. The candidate said his presence has helped the previous debates set records for viewership. "Without me, they'd have no ratings," he said in a Twitter post Tuesday as the feud erupted. (Associated Press)

Will he, or won't he, show up?

Conventional wisdom once held that a front-runner shouldn't debate his challengers because meeting them on the same stage gives them stature. So why do a favor for a challenger? That's why Ronald Reagan wouldn't debate George H.W. Bush in 1980. He sat on his lead, lost to Mr. Bush on caucus night and breathed new life into a challenger who began the race as a footnote in most early polls.