Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

This Sept. 5, 2014, photo by New York Times photographer Daniel Berehulak, part of a winning series,  shows James Dorbor, 8, suspected of being infected with Ebola, being carried by medical staff to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. The boy, who was brought in by his father, lay outside the center for at least six hours before being seen.  Berehulak is the winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography, announced Monday, April 20, 2015, at Columbia University in New York. (Daniel Berehulak, New York Times, Columbia University via AP)

A little good news about Ebola

- The Washington Times

The news from Africa and the Third World is seldom good, and much of the bad news is about disease born of ignorance, superstition and primitive sanitation, news dispatched by a media addicted to tales of unrelieved gloom, certain doom and inevitable disaster.

Unions Helped by Obama Appointees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping workers in the dark

Two of Sen. Harry Reid’s controversial legislative maneuvers are coming back to haunt American workers. In 2013, then-Majority Leader Reid’s threat to eviscerate the judicial filibuster cowed enough Senate Republicans to approve Big Labor’s handpicked candidates to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). A few months later, Mr. Reid acted on his threat to gut the filibuster and installed three of President Obama’s nominees on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Missing world leader by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the JV team of world leaders

British Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent stunning victory for his Conservative party catapulted him to one of the three top Western world leaders, alongside Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Francois Hollande. Mr. Cameron wasn’t supposed to win for numerous reasons, not the least of which because of his austerity policies and vigorous opposition from Labor and Liberal parties that thought a bigger government was the key to Britain’s growth.

Illustration on missing Muldovan bank funds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Who took Moldova’s millions — the crooks or the Kremlin?

On the eve of a national election in tiny Moldova last November, $450 million — equal to 10 percent of the Eastern European country’s entire annual gross domestic product — went missing. So far, no one knows where it went.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Chamber of Corporate Welfare

Here’s a half-serious question: How much do taxpayers have to pay off Boeing to make the Export-Import Bank — finally and irrevocably — go away? If the feds wrote a check to Boeing for $100 million, would they then let the Ex-Im Bank die a merciful and long overdue death?

Illustration on the abuse of citizens' rights under current government surveillance laws by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A better Patriot Act

Critical parts of the USA Patriot Act are about to expire. The reauthorization bill moving through Congress, the USA Freedom Act, has sparked controversy on both sides of the political aisle and within the civil-libertarian community, rekindling debates that began more than a decade ago. Now is the chance to implement much-needed reforms, including reforms to a provision not expiring: the one authorizing National Security Letters (NSL).

Paying heed to the walking wounded

A few days ago I received a thank you note from an American soldier who has been struggling with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As with many victims of TBI and PTSD, it had taken him a while to realize the true nature of his injury and to seek professional help.

White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the “a,” the “and,” and the “the.” Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants’ connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

Illustration about the abuse of Sixth Amendment rights in misdemeanor cases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Shining a light on 10 million criminal prosecutions

Adding to the growing momentum in Congress for bipartisan criminal justice reform, last week the Senate Judiciary Committee held a first-of-its-kind hearing to shine much-needed light on pervasive — and largely unexamined — problems in the largest segment of our criminal justice system. Republican Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa heard expert testimony describing widespread violations around the country of the Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel for Americans charged with misdemeanors.

Bringing Children into the World Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Are embryos persons or property?

Much of the media has ridiculed businessman Nick Loeb, the former fiance of actress Sofia Vergara, the star of the sitcom “Modern Family,” because he filed a lawsuit to prevent Ms. Vergara from destroying the frozen embryos they created together in 2013. But many in the pro-life community have rallied behind him, viewing the embryos that were created by Mr. Loeb and Ms. Vergara as persons deserving protection by the state.

**FILE** The sign for the National Labor Relations Board is seen outside the organization's headquarters in downtown Washington on July 17, 2013. (Associated Press)

Labor board overreach

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), stacked with Democratic appointees loyal to Big Labor, enacted new procedures to govern unionization elections.

Related Articles

Rebels without a cause

As a Marine Corps second lieutenant in 1971, the first article I wrote for the Marine Corps Gazette addressed the real possibility of an urban civil war in which the military might be called on to fight radical elements of my own generation who were advocating and actively working for the violent overthrow of the United States government.

Illustration on declining educational standards for history and civics by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

American amnesia

America received its history and civics report card recently, but there won't be any bumper stickers boasting of making the honor roll. The release of the U.S. Department of Education's latest National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) for history, civics and geography shows that we are raising another generation of historical and civic amnesiacs.

What GOP must do in 2016

One of President George W. Bush's primary reasons for authorizing the invasion of Iraq in 2003 was to eliminate the threat of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Bush's rush to war, known as Operation Iraqi Freedom, was criticized because no WMD ever were uncovered. Still, U.S. forces remained there (and then in Afghanistan) for years.

Baltimore's problems are not rooted in racist police

Attorney General Loretta Lynch has announced a Justice Department investigation to determine whether the Baltimore Police Department's practices are unconstitutional and violate civil rights; in short, whether or not the police force there is racist. It will come as no surprise if the investigation concludes that it is, because accusing the department of racism diverts attention from the city's real problem: Baltimore, a laboratory for liberal policies, is a failed city that has shortchanged the poor for decades.

Illustration contrasting the content of two recent addresses by Michelle Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The first lady and the race card

Michelle Obama can give as good as she gets, and she's getting a hard time from conservatives over two speeches she gave last week. The first was a commencement speech at Tuskegee University in Alabama, and the other was at the opening of the new Whitney Museum of American Art in downtown New York City.

Illustration on the continued erosion of liberty under the Freedom Act by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rand and Ted on the Fourth Amendment

A decision last week about National Security Agency spying by a panel of judges on the United States Court of Appeals in New York City sent shock waves through the government. The court ruled that a section of the Patriot Act that is due to expire at the end of this month and on which the government has relied as a basis for its bulk acquisition of telephone data during the past 14 years does not authorize that acquisition.

Illustration on fetal pain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pain-capable opponents ignore science

When I became a nurse more than 40 years ago, I took a vow to "devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care" but, initially, our understanding of science limited the extent to which I could fulfill that promise.

The Libertarian Party has launched a lawsuit against the Presidential Debate Commission to gain access for third party candidates at the official 2016 presidential debates (Our American Initiative)

Libertarian Party sues for access to presidential debates, calls exclusion 'unfair and illegal'

- The Washington Times

Independent and third party candidates have yet to stand on flashy podiums of officially sanctioned presidential debates. Now the Libertarian Party is pushing back. Fed up with its ongoing exclusion - and the valuable national exposure that is beyond their reach - the Libertarians now plans a lawsuit against the "duopoly" of Republican and Democratic candidates who have a guaranteed national forum - when alternative candidates do not.

Whose embassy is this?

Barack Obama's romance with the Castro brothers is rapidly turning into a sour shack-up. That's what happens sometimes to romances under a tropic moon and the rustle of the coconut palms. Cuba wants to redefine the sanctity of embassies, and how they function. The public still doesn't know what concessions the president is making to keep a flame under the romance, but it doesn't sound good for our side.

'Go the distance' to Cleveland

As Kevin Costner contemplated what to do in the iconic "Field of Dreams," a voice from on high gave him advice he would follow throughout the film: "Go the distance."

In this photo taken April 28, 2015, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks in San Juan, Puerto Rico. When Hillary Rodham Clinton takes the stage at fundraisers thrown by a group that wants to elect her president, she’s not a White House candidate. She’s a “special guest.” When Jeb Bush fundraises for a group preparing to run major parts of his all-but-certain presidential campaign, he doesn’t personally ask for money. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

Jeb Bush doubles down

Jeb Bush has grave differences with the Republicans who will nominate a candidate for president next summer in Cleveland -- differences on immigration, Common Core, and now on his brother's conduct of the war in Iraq. Mr. Bush winces at the notion that he's the "moderate" Republican that so many in his party think he is.

Illustrtation on the need for a U.S.response to China's world strategy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Getting real about China

Three times in April the Obama administration allowed the Pentagon to issue uncharacteristically expansive and blunt warnings over China's growing threat. However welcome, this trend is late in forming and must now be followed by more vigorous action to ensure China remains deterred.

Climate needs both parties

I am saddened to watch both our state and federal governments continue to argue about climate change. It doesn't make sense to make the essentially permanent changes to the Earth's physics and chemistry that we are making without looking closely at this together, across political divides, with open eyes and open hearts.

Illustration on Michael Silverstein's bid for the presidency by Alewxander Hunter/The Washington Times

Silverstein throws his hat into the ring

While nobody has actually asked me to run for president of the United States, I have begun to sense a yearning for me to do so emanating from the ranks of the still-uncommitted silent majority.

Stop catering to absurd

On the morning of April 25, CNN announced that a devastating earthquake had occurred in Nepal. At the time, there were only a 100 known deaths, but at a magnitude of 7.8 the impending doom was evident. What was even more astounding was that this story only received a couple of minutes' coverage. The main story, which was exploited for the next 10 minutes, was the Bruce Jenner interview with Diane Sawyer that had aired the previous night.

Illustration on Islamist threats to free speech by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The broad shield of the First Amendment

Rights are like muscles. If not exercised, they atrophy. Freedom of speech, a right guaranteed by the First Amendment, is the most fundamental of rights. Without it, how do you even defend your other rights?

President Obama hugs Elizabeth Warren as he arrives to speak at a campaign event at Symphony Hall, June 25, 2012, in Boston. (Associated Press)

A Democratic crack-up

Barack Obama's presidency, and the Democrats' chances of holding the White House in 2016, are fading faster than Hillary Clinton's emails.

How Churchill chose his ministers

How nervous was an unprepared Great Britain about a possible German invasion in 1940? The fears were made plain in a memo that Winston Churchill sent to the War Office soon after being made prime minister.

Illustration on Bernie Sanders' entry in to the 2016 presidential race by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Bernie Sanders, spoiler?

In this land of capitalist chaos there is something quaint about Bernard Sanders, the senator from Vermont, running for the Democratic presidential nomination as a socialist.