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Liberties Lost Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The presumption of liberty

In the years following the adoption of the Constitution, before he was secretary of state under President Thomas Jefferson and then president himself, James Madison, who wrote the Constitution, was a member of the House of Representatives.

Illustration on reality and memory in Germany on the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Berlin Wall, back to the future

Americans groove on the exhilaration of argument and accusation as the midterm elections finally approach, but here in Germany, there’s the bitter remembrance of what it was like to have none of the above.

Illustration on the standards and limitations of the national Core Curriculum by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Assessing Common Core: Con

Common Core is bad for students, and it’s bad for teachers, parents and state and local autonomy. It is a federal intrusion and all-encompassing leviathan that legally should not be allowed to stand.

Gov. Bill Haslam speaks at an economic development announcement in Cookville, Tenn., on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014. The Republican governor shrugged off a letter from state Rep. Rick Womick who had called it "treasonous" for a political action committee run by Haslam supporters to target GOP lawmakers who opposed the adminstration on Common Core education standards. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig)

Assessing Common Core: Pro

As states have begun to implement Common Core State Standards in earnest, controversy around the initiative has swelled.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 17, 2014, after a Democratic caucus meeting.  President Barack Obama will meet with Congressional leaders at the White House on Wednesday to discuss the turmoil in Iraq. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Voters know who to blame for their woes

Americans go to the polls on Nov. 4 to cast their votes in a midterm election that’s shaping up to be an angry outcry over the disastrous direction of the country.

Corrupt Foreign Policy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s phony foreign-aid reform

Four years ago, President Obama promised in a United Nations speech to “change the way we do business” with foreign aid and “seek partners who want to build their own capacity to provide for their people.” However, Mr. Obama, like numerous prior presidents, is more devoted to boosting aid spending than to fixing its flaws.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Invisible Bridge'

Liberals will like Rick Perlstein's "The Invisible Bridge" for it will affirm their sense of moral superiority and the certainty that their motives are always pure. It will also reinforce their view that conservatives are ill-motivated haters and yahoos.

Illustration on excessive government regulation of oil by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Opening the tap for crude-oil exports

Not many years ago, the idea of "peak oil" was all the rage. The concept, first identified in 1956 by M. King Hubbert, a geologist working for Shell Oil, held that there was a finite amount of oil in the ground and that oil production would peak in the 1970s and then decline.

Illustration on Ron Klain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Treating Ebola with politics

When the then-spreading Ebola virus threatened our nation last week, President Obama put one man in charge of coordinating the government's response who had zero experience in handling infectious diseases.

Health workers wear protective gears before entering the house of a person suspected to have died of Ebola virus in Port loko Community situated on the outskirts of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. After emerging months ago in eastern Sierra Leone, Ebola is now hitting the western edges of the country where the capital is located with dozens of people falling sick each day, the government said Tuesday. So many people are dying that removing bodies is reportedly a problem. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)

EDITORIAL: A respite from Ebola

The Ebola threat seems to have subsided, and that's cause for cautious relief. The operative word is "seems," but three weeks have passed since an unemployed Liberian man flew into the United States and infected two health care workers with the deadly virus.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: GOP response lacking to green-card giveaway

Ebola, the Internal Revenue Service, Benghazi, unfettered illegal immigration — the list goes on and on. While Rome burns, the politicians see no evil, hear no evil and speak not a word against the evil being foisted on the citizens of the United States by an ideologically bankrupt president and his corrupt Democratic Party ("Green cards on the table," Web, Oct. 20).

Illustration on free trade and government restrictions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Free-trade superstitions

What's it like being a free-market advocate in the 21st century? I think it can be summarized as follows: Another day, another dollar — and another attack on capitalism.

Workers set up a giant advertisement for Apple's iPhone 6 which goes on sale in China, Friday, Oct 17 2014 in Beijing. China is one of Apple's largest and growing market where enthusiasts of the company's latest iPhone are willing to pay thousands of dollars to get their hands on the latest version. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

EDITORIAL: Apple and Google restrain the snoops

Obama administration officials seem to think the Constitution gives the government a license to snoop on whomever it pleases, whenever it pleases. The founding document does no such thing, of course, but Congress cannot summon the courage to restrain the executive branch.

In this Oct. 1, 2014 photo, placards advocating a position to keep casino gambling in Massachusetts rest against a wall in the entrance to the Plainridge Racecourse harness racing track in Plainville, Mass. The Plainridge Park Casino is under construction adjacent to the harness racing track in Plainville. Voters will decide in the Nov. 4 election whether to repeal a 2011 law that opened the door for casinos in the state. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Pew Research poll finds motivated conservatives twice as likely as liberals to vote on Nov. 4

- The Washington Times

Conservatives are twice as likely as their liberal counterparts to go to the polls Nov. 4. No really. "Although overall turnout among the public is likely to be around 40 percent, 73 percent of those who hold consistently conservative attitudes are likely to vote in the midterm, as are 52 percent of those with mostly conservative views," reports the Americans Trends Panel, a substantial new gauge of the upcoming midterm election by the indefatigable Pew Research Center.