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President Barack Obama speaks to reporters in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. President Obama is rejecting Russia's military campaign in Syria, saying it fails to distinguish between terrorist groups and moderate rebel forces with a legitimate interest in a negotiated end to the civil war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The cipher in the White House

- The Washington Times

Perhaps it’s not fair to blame Barack Obama for the mess he’s making. The Middle East is where chaos was invented, after all, and perhaps not even the collection of incompetents and boobs the president has installed in the White House could make things this bad. Maybe it’s someone else’s fault. He blames the Jews.

Illustration on Putin's moves in Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Fast-roping toward war in the Middle East

The Russians are rapidly reinforcing their bridgehead in Syria, adding ground troops to their air, marine and naval forces. It is a classic air, land and sea intervention by a military establishment that understands how combined arms build synergies and broaden capabilities.

Responsible Immigration Laws Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Facing the agonizing immigration duty

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that no nation can sustain open borders. Even the wealthiest, most popular “nations of immigrants” such as the United States cannot possibly accept everyone who wants to immigrate or even qualifies to do so.

Illustration on Putin's actions in Syria by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beware Putin and his ‘anti-Hitler coalition’

Contrary to the principles of American foreign policy of the last 70 years, President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry tacitly invited Russia to “help” monitor things in the Middle East. Now they are learning that there are lots of Middle East scenarios far worse than the relative quiet Iraq that the Obama administration inherited in January 2009 — and soon abandoned.

Illustration on the call for a better armed society by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Ban gun-free zones

Would you put a sign outside your house saying, “Doors unlocked,” or “We’re not home”?

Illustration on developing Romania's tourist industry by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ongoing flux in East-Central Europe

For nearly a century, East-Central Europe has been a perennially unsettled region. Pragmatic deals cut after World War I, with more following World War II, have kept the area in an unending state of flux.

Illustration on Putin's Middle East intentions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Pravda’ on Russia in Syria

Pravda is the most abused word in the Russian language. Though it means “truth,” we learned it as the name of a Soviet-era, government-controlled newspaper that printed everything except the truth.

Illustration on the impact of Syrian mass migration to Europe by Schrank, The Independent on Sunday, London, England

Paralysis over Syria

There is turbulence in the eurozone and its disquieting genesis lies in the protracted Syrian civil war, some 750 miles to the east.

Illustration on the position of the D.C. Metropolitan police under Chief Lanier by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrity versus loyalty

Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier is often portrayed by an admiring media as an almost uniquely popular and effective law enforcement leader, who has made the District safer than ever by putting together one of the most effective big city police departments in the country.

Illustration on FDIC targeting of the payday loan industry by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When bureaucrats rule personal preference

Ours is a nation of laws, not men. Our Constitution requires the concurrence of majorities in both houses of Congress and the signature of the president in order to create those laws.

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John Boehner    Associated Press photo

John Boehner, then and now

The announcement by House Speaker John Boehner that he is retiring at the end of October stunned Washington where life is all about grabbing power and holding on to it, often until death they do part.

Pope Francis talks to journalists during a press conference he held while en route to Italy, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. Pope Francis returned to the Vatican Monday at the end of a 10-day trip to Cuba and the United States. (Tony Gentile/Pool Photo via AP) ** FILE **

Overlooked remarks from the 'people's pope'

To say that Pope Francis' visit to the United States drew a lot of media attention would be an understatement. The coverage was 'round-the-clock. Yet as a lifelong "cradle Catholic," educated by Jesuits, I couldn't help noticing what a remarkably incomplete, if not misleading, portrait emerged of the Holy Father.

Blame game: Russian President Vladimir Putin, while bolstering military aid to Syria, said U.S. moves have deepened the ongoing refugee crisis. (Associated Press)

A small victory for Putin

Vladimir Putin can claim a small victory Monday at the United Nations when he sits down with Barack Obama, even if, as the White House suggests, it was the Russian president who asked for the date.

Fund, update GMD now

These days, you can't open the newspaper without seeing stories about the Iranian nuclear program ("Iranians provided own samples for nuclear site inspection," Web, Sept. 21). But as we focus on Iran, let's remember that the greater threat to the U.S. homeland comes from North Korea.

Reinstate ethical Green Beret

In World War II, America sent its finest men and women to oppose Hitler's tyranny. Had we not responded to Winston Churchill's pleas for the United States' involvement, it is conceivable that Europe, and certainly many more of the Jewish people, would have perished under the Nazis.

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, gets emotional during the opening of a ceremony awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to the American Fighter Aces,, Wednesday May 20, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Exit the speaker, crying

John Boehner's speakership had been on life support for weeks. The only surprise of his resignation was the timing. He obviously saw something bad coming at him. Better to exit crying than to be pushed out fighting.

Illustration on Congress' efforts to control Wall Street excesses by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

Shadow-boxing over Dodd-Frank

Let's be brutally frank. Opportunities to pass vital, consensus, community bank regulatory relief legislation are fading. While Republicans and Democrats alike have pledged to reform excessive regulatory burdens on Main Street institutions to improve local economies, partisan bickering threatens to thwart enacting needed regulatory relief anytime soon.

Illustration on the proposed USPS replacement fleet by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the Postal Service continues to burn money

Most people are going to tell you that they can't stand seeing good money go to waste. When it comes to the U.S. government, however, wasteful spending continues to be the name of the game.

Illustration on the exodus from blue states to red by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

High-tailing it out of blue states

The so-called "progressives" love to talk about how their policies will create a worker's paradise, but then why is it that day after day, month after month, year after year, people are fleeing liberal blue states for conservative red states?

Image from Longview International Technology

Computer geeks and hackers band together to help military vets with PTSD

- The Washington Times

Military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder - PTSD - have some new allies. Organized in conjunction with the Dept. of Veterans Affairs, a motivated group of computer geeks and software developers are devoting 36 hours to "Hacking PTSD: A hackathon for healing" to seek solutions for vets who must manage flashbacks, insomnia and the other challenges of the condition.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Fox, CNN unfair in debates

Fox News is not a conservative news organization, though many of its commentators, including Sean Hannity and Bill O'Reilly, seem to be conservatives. Republican presidential contender Sen. Ted Cruz was on Steven Colbert's "Late Show" Monday night, but when watching "Fox and Friends" Tuesday morning, all the hosts mentioned was media darling Carly Fiorina being on Jimmy Fallon's show. Not once did they mention Mr. Cruz's appearance with Mr. Colbert. However, when Donald Trump was on "The Late Show," Fox News had a story on it.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Media-hound persona hurts Rand Paul

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky is attracting a lot of attention as a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination. And when he sticks to a topic such as opposition to the Patriot Act, he sounds credible. But when he veers off-topic with ad-hominem charges against fellow Republicans and others, or when he downplays the dangers of drugs, he commands media attention more for outrageous assumptions and conclusions than for accuracy.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Give refuge to religious minorities

Syrians and Iraqis are currently flooding Europe seeking a new life. Following World War II European countries allowed 20 million people from the Middle East and North Africa to enter. These people now number 50 million, and they refuse to integrate into Western societies. Most of the areas settled by these immigrants are depressed and lawless, and the immigrants want to implement Sharia law.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015, at a banquet in Seattle. Leaders from Michigan to Beijing attended meetings Tuesday with Xi in the U.S. and signed an agreement to work together to advance renewable energy and clean technologies to combat climate change. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

A challenge to President Xi

Little things can mean a lot, but it isn't always easy to decipher exactly what those little things mean. Almost on the eve of Chinese President Xi Jinping's arrival in the United States for an elaborate state visit, something happened over the Yellow Sea, which separates China and the Korean Peninsula.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a campaign stop in Baton Rouge, La., on Sept. 21, 2015. (Associated Press)

Hillary in a corner

Anot-so-funny thing is happening to Hillary Clinton on her way to the coronation. By this time she was supposed to be busy getting accustomed to the purple, looking forward to high times next summer at the Democratic National Convention in Tampa.