Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

LAST LINE OF DEFENSE: Afghan National Army forces are not ready to rebuff an expected Taliban offensive, on its own, once all American troops leave after 2016, according to reports from U.S. Green Berets. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Afghanistan’s Taliban IS a terrorist organization

Congressional overseers should demand, in hearings or otherwise, for the White House and State Department to fully explain why the group isn’t on the State Department terror list.

Illustration on the childhood risks in contact sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Weighing the childhood risks of contact sports

The incidence and severity of brain injury is one of the hottest topics in sports media today, and it is creating a storm of near-panic in youth sports — especially football. We worry that the public’s misunderstanding of the available medical research is the gravest threat facing organized contact sport at the youth and high school levels.

Dire predictions about Citizens United prove false

Five years ago last week, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the landmark Supreme Court decision, Citizens United, that “the worth of speech ‘does not depend upon the identity of its source, whether corporation, association, union, or individual.’” The government, the court affirmed, cannot censor or ban the political speech of individuals simply because they organize themselves as a corporation or labor union.

M1903 SPRINGFIELD - formally the United States Rifle, Caliber .30-06, Model 1903, is an American clip-loaded, 5-round magazine fed, bolt-action service rifle used primarily during the first half of the 20th century. It was officially adopted as a United States military bolt-action rifle on June 19, 1903, and saw service in World War I. It was officially replaced as the standard infantry rifle by the faster-firing semi-automatic 8 round M1 Garand starting in 1937. However, the M1903 Springfield remained in service as a standard issue infantry rifle during World War II, since the U.S. entered the war without sufficient M1 rifles to arm all troops. It also remained in service as a sniper rifle during World War II, the Korean War, and even in the early stages of the Vietnam War. It remains popular as a civilian firearm, historical collector's piece, and as a military drill rifle.

World War II’s only execution for desertion

Seventy years ago tomorrow, Private Eddie Slovik (1920-1945) became the first and only soldier since the Civil War to be executed for desertion, a military offense that has recently surfaced in the news about Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

Illustration on accurately identifying Islamist terror by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Freedom, security — and the truth

With blizzards, deflated footballs and green-lipsticked YouTube personalities dominating recent news, it was easy to miss two hugely important truth-telling moments. If only they had received the same coverage as air pressure in NFL regulation footballs.

Eric Rose, 6, from Ellwood Christian Academy, in Selma, participates in a National School Choice Week rally at the Alabama State Capitol, Wednesday Jan. 28, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala. Parents and students rallied on the lawn of the Alabama Capitol Wednesday, urging state politicians to provide more publicly funded education options.(AP Photo/Hal Yeager)

Busting myths about school choice

The implementation of school choice is sure to become much more popular as the myths surrounding race, religion, and student outcomes are continually disproven.

A New York City snowplow, loaded with salt, sits parked in midtown Manhattan as light snow falls, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Northeast residents are girding for a heavy snowstorm that could bury communities from northern New Jersey to southern Maine in up to 2 feet of snow. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Another snow job

Today, politicians and their ideological fellow travelers in the media use the normal cycles of the seasons to promote “climate change.”

Illustration on the failed policy of enemy combatant internment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The al-Marri enigma

Ali Saleh al-Marri is a convicted conspirator who entered the United States before Sept. 11, 2001, in order to create a dreaded sleeper cell here that might someday launch an attack on Americans similar to what we witnessed earlier this month in Paris. When the feds woke from their slumber on Sept. 11, they wisely began to search immigration records for persons who came here with no discernible purpose from places known to spawn terrorist groups and who had overstayed their visas. Al-Marri was one such person.

Illustration on heroism replaced by narcissism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Heroes in the age of the selfie

Heroes, real ones, are getting harder to find. One of the few remaining annual surprises in the typical State of the Union address is the president’s introduction of his “mystery guest.” President Reagan introduced the first one in 1982, celebrating one Leonard Skutnik for an extraordinary act of courage.

Related Articles

This undated image posted online and made available on Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014 by Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently, an anti-Islamic State group organization, shows children at an Islamic State group training camp in Raqqa, Syria. The image has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting. Across the vast region in Syria and Iraq that is part of the Islamic State group's self-declared caliphate, children are being inculcated with the extremist group's radical and violent interpretation of Shariah law. (AP Photo/Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently)

When children are expendable

If children are the future, the terrorists who ravish and ravage the young in pursuit of empire portend a very bleak future in the benighted lands. Evil men continue to poison the young with the venom and bile that describe the distortions of their religion. The world stands aghast and incredulous at the violence visited upon the innocent, and at the reluctance to judge another's faith that is the mark of American tolerance. The fear of reprisal restrains many Muslims from condemning acts they know are atrocities. There is no holy writ anywhere to excuse using children as fodder for cannon. No one's God is that cynical.

A Belgian soldier patrols in front of EU headquarters in Brussels on Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Security has been stepped up after thirteen people were detained in Belgium in an anti-terror sweep following a firefight in Verviers, in which two suspected terrorists were killed. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

Possibly up to 1,000 Islamists in Belgium

Sources close to French and Belgian intelligence services say there could be up to 1,000 Islamist "sleepers" currently hiding in Belgium and waiting for the right moment to strike.

No halo for Holder on forfeiture fix

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. announced on Friday that the Justice Department would cease sharing confiscated private property with state and local police agencies under its Equitable Sharing program. Asset forfeiture has recently been widely denounced by both liberals and conservatives as an civil liberties atrocity that has victimized innocent Americans across the nation. A Washington Post report suggested that the policy change was part of Mr. Holder's efforts "to burnish his place in history."

After the Massacre Azerbaijan 1990

From tragedy to independence

Twenty-five years ago today, while then-President George H.W. Bush was delivering his State of the Union message before a joint session of Congress in Washington, Soviet troops attacked unarmed civilian protesters in the Azerbaijani capital of Baku, killing some 133 people and wounding hundreds of others.

Gary Becker

The lions of liberty

People are a bit more free and prosperous as a result of the work of Gary Becker, John Blundell, Leonard Liggio, Gordon Tullock and Henry Manne, all of whom passed away during the last eight months.

This Nov. 13, 2014, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol Dome, in Washington, surrounded by scaffolding for a long-term repair project, and framed by the last of autumn's colorful leaves. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Dull but important D.C.

A story line that's often under covered: Washington is getting lots of things done and will do so throughout 2015.

Illustration on The State of the Union Address by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama sings the same old song

Here's a suggestion for Joni Ernst, the new Republican senator from Iowa, who will deliver the GOP response to the State of the Union address Tuesday night. Get a chorus together and open with this old Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne number: "It seems to me I've heard that song before; it's from an old familiar score, I know it well, that melody."

Nigel Farage leader of Britain's UK Independence Party (UKIP) celebrates as he hears the results of the south east region European Parliamentary Election vote at the Guildhall in Southampton, England, Monday, May 26, 2014. From Portugal to Finland, voters of 21 nations cast ballots Sunday to decide the makeup of the next European Parliament and help determine the European Union’s future leaders and course. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

In defense of Europe's so-called far right

Rather than engage in name-calling and attempts at exclusion, established institutions should encourage the populist parties to moderate, become more sophisticated, and fully participate in the political process.

Critic suggests White House cancel State of the Union address - too 'big, noisy, overhyped'

- The Washington Times

"Are we ready for a big, noisy, overhyped prime-time production that has outgrown its simple origins and usually leaves us feeling both gorged and disappointed? If not, you may want to skip the State of the Union address and prepare for something humbler, like the Super Bowl," says Steve Chapman, a Chicago Tribune columnist, who notes that President Obama has already revealed much of his speech to the nation. "Cancel the State of the Union," says Mr. Chapman.

Chips off the block

Credit card fraud is everybody's headache. If the hackers haven't got to you yet, they will. There's a new weapon against the hackers, called "chip-and-PIN technology," but replacing a billion credit cards is expensive and some of the big banks are reluctant to put out the millions (and millions) of dollars to pay for it. The federal government is using chip-and-PIN cards but not many private users in the United States have access to it.

Illustration on EPA methane regulation by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of the methane menace

Last week the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced major new regulations on the emissions of methane into the air from oil and gas production. It calls methane a "potent" pollutant and its new rules would require a 45 percent reduction by 2025 from 2012 levels. Most Americans support these new rules, according to polling from environmental groups. This isn't surprising. Methane sounds like a dirty and dangerous pollutant and even deadly if leaked into water or the air.

Illustration on the spiritual costs of submission to evil by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The silencing of the soul

The massacre in Paris by Muslim militants at the Charlie Hebdo magazine office was about much more than freedom of speech. After all, militants also killed four hostages at a Jewish market, and that was not about freedom to buy kosher food.

When the Nazis failed to cross the channel

The Nazi invasion of England — code-named "Operation Sea Lion" — so widely anticipated in the wake of the precipitate fall of France in June 1940 is one of the great non-happenings of history. This absorbing, detailed book by British journalist and historian Leo McKinstry shows that it might indeed have happened and explains the various reasons why it did not.

Illustration on the exorbitant costs of maintaining detainees at Guantanamo Bay by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The reasons why Guantanamo is so expensive

In listening to President Obama and most Democrats in Congress, one might think that holding detainees at Guantanamo Bay is what's bankrupting America.

The president goes to war

President Obama has gone to war. But not with the Islamic State group, Iran, North Korea or any foreign threat. Mr. Obama, at the urging of environmental extremists, has declared war on America's oil and natural gas producers. His weapon of choice is a new Environmental Protection Agency regulation to cut methane emissions by up to 45 percent by 2025.

Micheal Mpubane leads a Bible study at the Progressive Primary in Johannesburg. Poor South Africans are underserved by a government that has struggled to close the gap apartheid created between white and black public schools. (Associated Press)

Learning in unexpected places

"Education for all" was set as a worldwide priority by the United Nations in 1990, to be accomplished in 25 years. The deadline is upon us and billions of dollars later, UNESCO, the cultural arm of the U.N., says there are still 175 million children in the developing world who can't read or write. This is taken as proof at the U.N. that governments must "intensify their efforts," meaning they must "intensify" the spending of more money. The facts tell a different story.

U.S. must step up

As France changes its foreign policy and sends an aircraft carrier to help fight the Islamic State following the Paris terrorist attacks, American leadership is still needed to coordinate and unite 40 nations ("Key U.S. military command's Twitter, YouTube sites back online," Web, Jan. 13). Russia is building up forces facing Poland and the Baltic states and is fortifying Kaliningrad. The Islamic State and al Qaeda are planning more attacks. China continues to dominate and threaten its neighbors. Now more than ever effective leadership is needed to deal with increasing Russian aggression, the increasing radical Islamic threat and continued Chinese expansion.

Pope Francis     Associated Press photo

Pope Francis, neither a Marxist nor an economist

Last week Pope Francis defended himself against the charges of Marxism, explaining that caring for the poor is at the heart of Christian teaching. The pope is right. Caring about the poor does not make one a Marxist. By the same logic, defense of the free market does not make one oblivious to the plight of the less fortunate.

Saudi Arabia funds terror

The time has come to identify the primary instigators of terrorism as being Sunni Muslims. What do the perpetrators of the USS Cole attack, the two attacks on the World Trade Center, the recent attacks in Canada, Australia and France, Osama bin Laden, Anwar al-Awlaki, the Islamic State and al Qaeda all have in common? They are all tied to Sunni terrorism, sponsored philosophically and financially by Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar.