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Obama’s futile overtures to Cuba

President Obama’s argument for unilaterally reversing U.S.-Cuba policy rests on the false premise that engagement with dictators and terrorists will somehow get them to change their ways.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's "empathy' for the enemy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary’s jaded sense of justice

The Benghazi massacre most certainly deserves to be a subject Hillary Rodham Clinton should be held accountable for and never allowed to forget. Yet there is another, even more recklessly dangerous thing that will affect Mrs. Clinton’s designs on the White House: her attitude in general toward America’s enemies.

Illustration on Obama's new policy toward Cuba by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Koch brothers bad, Castro brothers Boy Scouts

Liberals were in a near euphoric state on Wednesday after President Obama announced that the United States and Cuba are on a path to normalizing relations between the two nations, a move that will pave the way for a U.S. Embassy in Havana, and may eventually lead to lifting a 50-year-old American trade embargo.

In this Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014, photo, American flags fly in front of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) ** FILE **

Recalling what is right about America

Everywhere, we suddenly hear words of division, difference, recrimination. Suddenly, America is Ferguson, Missouri writ large. But are we? Are we not still Americans, first?

Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare’s Christmas surprise

Get ready for the largely underreported rule that will allow CMS to change Americans’ health plans without their knowledge.

In this Dec. 17, 2014, file photo, a poster for the movie "The Interview" is carried away by a worker after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Hollywood cowers at this laff riot over ‘The Interview’

- The Washington Times

Movies may not be better than ever, as a Hollywood marketing slogan in yesteryear boasted they were, but the critics take movies seriously in North Korea. The chief movie critic in Pyongyang can kill a movie with a single review. He might even kill anybody who goes to see it.

Illustration on steps needed to protect U.S. intellectual property by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lessons from the Sony hack attack

The hacking attack of Sony Corp. and the compromising of its intellectual property should send a wake-up call to American business. If Sony can be hacked, so too can our companies that make defense technologies. This attack reveals that the very innovations that give us our competitive edge in the world, both commercially and strategically, are gravely at risk.

Illustration on continued access to Juvenile criminal records by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Allowing access to juveniles’ records hurts their chances of going straight

By incapacitating violent and dangerous offenders, incarceration can promote public safety. But a point of diminishing returns is reached as prisons sweep in more and more nonviolent, low-risk offenders. These circumstances are even more alarming when you look at the juvenile justice system and consider that 95 percent of youths in this system have committed nonviolent offenses, including some that weren’t even a crime when many of us were kids.

Illustration on Obama's normalization policy towards Cuba by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama adds Cuba to his list of sellouts

President Obama continues to embrace low-tier, go-it-alone executive actions to pad the last two years of his mistake-filled, empty-agenda presidency in a hopeless hunt for a legacy. His arrogant decision this week to re-establish diplomatic relations with communist Cuba is the latest example of a president desperately searching for something do without having to deal with Congress.

Illustration on the need to identify Islamic terrorism for what it is by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Suicide by political correctness

- The Washington Times

During its coverage of this week’s Islamic terrorist attack in Sydney, Australia, CNN ran a telling banner: “Motivation of suspect unknown.” Motivation unknown? Really?

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A flag the flew over one of the ships during the Pearl Harbor attack is displayed on the dock during the Pearl Harbor memorial ceremony Sunday, Dec. 7, at the USS Edson in Bangor Township, Mich. (AP Photo/The Bay City Times, Yfat Yossifor) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL INTERNET OUT

ED FEULNER: Remembering true American heroes

Mention Hawaii to most people, and they think of sand and surf. But this sun-drenched vacation mecca is also home to one of the most infamous events in history: the Dec. 7, 1941 Japanese attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor.

Rift Between We and They illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The unfairness of Obamacare

Next year, when the employer mandate of Obamacare is activated, millions of Americans will be screaming in pain as their health insurance premiums skyrocket or as they lose their health insurance altogether. It will be just one more piece of the rapidly crumbling health care system that was forced upon the unsuspecting American people through political manipulation and deception.

The dilemma that John Boehner, the speaker of the House, faces is that conservatives in the House want to include measures to thwart President Obama's immigration amnesty. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

EDITORIAL: The angry House conservatives

Conservatives in Congress are steaming, and with good reason. If the 113th Congress, now on its deathbed but still twitching and making dying sounds, doesn't appropriate the money needed to keep the government operating until the deadline at the end of the week, the government will have to shut down. This is something the Republican leaders in both the House and Senate vow they will avoid by whatever means necessary.

2014 Pro-life Mid-Term Ballots Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pro-life wave washes over midterms

Democratic candidates trotted out the cliched "war on women" theme in the midterms. Advocates of abortion-on-demand worked to convince voters they had women's interests at heart. It hasn't worked in the past and, in 2014, it really didn't work.

The ‘renaissance admiral’ takes command

A 1976 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Adm. James Stavridis served for 35 years on active duty in the Navy, commanding destroyers and a carrier strike groups in combat, and for seven years as a four-star admiral, the last four years of which (2009 to 20013) were spent as the first Naval officer chosen as Supreme Allied Commander for Global Operations at NATO.

Illustration on political economic corruption in Ukraine by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Is it ‘game over’ for Ukraine?

Ukraine will likely go bankrupt within the next few months. This past Friday, it was reported that the country has less than $10 billion in foreign-currency reserves. My sources (who have been spot on the Russian/Ukrainian situation over the last couple of years) tell me the situation is actually worse than the official reports in that Ukraine is now losing foreign reserves at a rate of $3 billion a month and that rate is accelerating. Even worse, some of the reserves may be "illiquid" — which likely means they have already been spent or even stolen.

Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin says Republicans need to show up in minority neighborhoods and ask what has voting for Democrats gotten them? It's a good question..  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Rep. Paul Ryan's hope for a Congress that works

Like two predatory animals circling each other, Republicans and Democrats are trying to sort out the meaning of last month's election and plan strategies for the remaining days of the current Congress and the new one in which Republicans will hold majorities in both houses.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Ferguson destroyed itself

I am not sure about the rest of America, but I have had enough of Ferguson, Missouri. You can blame the recent riots across our country and the continued sensationalism of the Ferguson riot on the news media, be it TV, print or Internet, along with the Rev. Al Sharpton and Louis Farrakhan and their ilk. Rev. Sharpton and Mr. Farrakhan should be arrested and charged for inciting this riot; they, along with Attorney Gen. Eric Holder and a racially divisive president, continue to incite violence. We have laws on the books, but our 'community organizer' turned his head until the rioting was over, then convened a summit at the White House to discuss how it could have taken place.

Illustration on the coming presidential race by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The race for the 2016 presidency

- The Washington Times

Republican and Democratic presidential wannabes are beginning to focus on 2016, evaluating their chances and building on the contacts and chits they've accumulated over the last few years. Some have been at it for some time, some are still thinking about running. While many candidates are being discussed or having their supporters see about getting them discussed, this long list will shorten in the months ahead.

Even though the Army told Congress that it would prefer to buy no more of the outdated Abrams tanks, the Defense Authorization Act includes a $120 million earmark for more Abrams tanks. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno told Congress emphatically that there's no need to buy more such tanks. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

EDITORIAL: Authorization for wasting money

The House has passed the $585 billion Fiscal Year 2015 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Clearing that obstacle is good. Unfortunately, the legislation is larded with billions of dollars in waste and fat, and now the Senate must muster the determination to do what the House wouldn't.

This Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, photo shows the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. On Friday, Rolling Stone magazine cast doubt on its story of a young woman who said she was gang-raped at a party by the fraternity at the University of Virginia, saying it has since learned of "discrepancies" in her account. (AP Photo/The Daily Progress, Ryan M. Kelly) **FILE**

Feminists wrong on UVa rape story

- The Washington Times

Some of our most dedicated feminists are trying to make a good thing of rape, heretofore regarded as one of the more horrific crimes. Once upon a time rape was even a capital crime, like murder. Many men went to the gallows or the electric chair for it.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Boston Raphael'

The first Renaissance men admired the classical world's gods and heroes, the former acting like teenagers in pursuit of mischief, deception and sex, the latter displaying genius, courage and caritas. It was a wonder to this reviewer — writing book reports in fifth grade — that the nominally divine personages (i.e., gods) wreaked havoc while profane people performed glorious beaux gestes.

Carbon Tax Fossil Fuel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The carbon tax canard

Last week I testified before Sen. Barbara Boxer's Committee on Environment and Public Works on the issue of energy and climate change. This was Ms. Boxer's swan song as chairwoman of the committee (thank God), so she predictably stacked the deck with a gang of climate change alarmists.

Illustration on comparisons between Barack Obama and Woodrow Wilson by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The decline of the American century, 1914-2014

On this date in 1914, in his second annual address to Congress, President Wilson signaled to the world that the significant role that his White House predecessor, Theodore Roosevelt, had carved out for the United States as a strong military power was being relinquished. No matter that TR had built up the American Navy and displayed it on a global cruise in 1907, Wilson, at the beginning of World War I, washed his hands of a strong presence abroad.