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Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It’s been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council — an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies — President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America’s anti-growth tax system.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump’s hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can’t agree on the replacement “plan.”

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump’s meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California’s mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump’s presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration’s top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

CIA Bullies Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The CIA’s affront to Trump

The CIA has denied a security clearance to Trump National Security Council (NSC) official Robin Townley without any allegation, much less evidence of disloyalty to the United States. Quite simply, it is because the CIA disapproves of Mr. Townley’s attitude toward the agency, and this is unprecedented.

President Donald Trump calls out to the media after escorting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to his car to depart the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Intellectual honesty and political indifference

Over the past weekend, Trump administration officials offered harsh criticisms of the judicial interference with the enforcement of the president’s immigration order. The Jan. 27 order suspended the immigration privileges of all refugees from Syria indefinitely and all immigrants from seven designated countries for 90 days.

ISIS Drone Attacks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS drones could target Europe

Killer drones guided by Islamic State terrorists have made their debut in Northern Iraq, prompting concern about a new terror weapon outside of Iraq.

Illustration on the EMP threat to the U.S. from North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

North Korea, the real threat

When might North Korean develop missiles capable of striking the United States? Today.

Related Articles

Illustration on the restoration of religious freedom in the U.S. after Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Religious freedom can be restored

In its most recent "Two Minutes Hate" on President Trump, The Nation magazine's hyperbolic headline warned, "Leaked Draft of Trump's Religious Freedom Order Reveals Sweeping Plans to Legalize Discrimination." Claiming that if signed, the president's order "would create wholesale exemptions for people and organizations who claim religious objections to same sex marriage, premarital sex, abortion and trans identity, The Nation predicts that the order would "exceed the authority of executive branch," and "risk violating the Establishment Clause of the first Amendment to the Constitution."

In this photo provided by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, DNA Learning Center Assistant Director Amanda McBrien looks on as World of Enzymes camp participants set up apparatus for gel electrophoresis in Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. (Chun-hua Yang/Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory via AP)

Missouri models Wisconsin on labor reform

When Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker signed Act 10 in 2011, he did more than place taxpayers and public employees above entrenched union interests. On a personal level, that moment "started his conservative ascent," according to The New York Times, and he became the man Rush Limbaugh called "a demonstrated, genuine hero and potential star" in the Republican Party.

China and America, and the romance of history's oddest couple

Trying to understand China has been compared to gazing into jade. Cloudy and yet softly glowing, jade, in the words of the great Japanese novelist and essayist Tanizaki Junichiro, "quite lacks the brightness of a ruby or an emerald or the glitter of a diamond. But this much we can say: When we see that shadowy surface, we think how Chinese it is, we seem to find in cloudiness the accumulated sediment of the long Chinese past, we think how appropriate it is that the Chinese should admire that surface and that shadow."

Protecting the Homeland Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Border security means that entering is privilege, not a right

"Being able to come to America is a privilege, not a right," White House spokesmen Sean Spicer said at a recent news conference. Mr. Spicer defended President Trump's order that would halt Syrian refugees indefinitely, block all refugee admissions for four months and ban citizens of seven countries -- Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Syria, Sudan, Libya and Yemen -- from entering the United States for at least 90 days.

American Sattelite Technology Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Aerospace sector can make America great again

SpaceX just launched 10 Iridium Communications satellites into low-Earth orbit. These satellites will beam phone and data service to tens of thousands of Americans who live or work in areas too remote for regular cellphone coverage.

Ain't seen nothing yet

President Trump's defensive action is mild compared to what Israel does to protect its citizens ("Former U.S. officials: Trump travel ban could endanger troops, 'do long-term damage,'" Web, Feb. 6).

President Donald Trump, center, waves to military service members after arriving on Air Force One at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., on Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. (Octavio Jones/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Resisting the 'resistance'

The drums of conflict grow louder by the day. Never-Trump demonstrators and their rioting factions are mustering their forces to mortally wound Donald Trump's presidency before it gains further momentum. The battle is broader than opposition to an unconventional chief executive.

President Donald Trump salutes a Marines honor guard as he disembarks from Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A time to chill

The spirit of Rodney Dangerfield no longer stands alone. The comedian who complained that "I don't get no respect" now speaks for just about everybody. In modern America, "nobody gets no respect."

Free speech for all, not just some

Having taught at the University of California, Berkeley many years ago, I know exactly where last Tuesday's riots occurred, as I crossed Sproul Plaza regularly ("Trump floats cutting off federal funds after Berkeley riots," Web, Feb. 2). Further, as a very, very old-fashioned liberal, I believe that the true heart of a high-quality liberal arts education is exposure to and engagement with a wide variety of ideas covering all points of view.

Marine Le Pen (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Exporting the example of the new American revolution

- The Washington Times

The voice of the chicken, like the voice of the turtle, is heard in the land and it's making a fearsome racket, on final approach to the roost. The established order has been turned upside down in a flutter of fine feathers. The unmentionables and the deplorables are suddenly at the village gates.

Revisionist History of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Remembering the Holocaust, forgetting the Jews, again

There was something familiar about the Trump White House's statement marking International Day in Commemoration of Victims of the Holocaust on Jan. 27. And something odd about news media coverage and remonstrances following it.

President Donald Trump salutes a Marines honor guard as he disembarks from Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017 from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

'Be careful what you wish for'

At the National Prayer Breakfast last week, President Trump promised to "totally destroy" the so-called Johnson Amendment, a law that prohibits churches from endorsing or opposing political candidates at the risk of losing their tax-exempt status.

Illustration on the value of the dollar and its alternatives by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Private money-like products gain traction amid mistrust of government

We all think we know what money is, but economists have many different definitions of money (e.g., M1, M2, M4, and others) -- and the problem is getting worse. Is the U.S. paper dollar you have in your wallet money? How about a one-ounce gold $50 coin minted by the U.S. government, which has a current market value of roughly $1,200? Or digital "bitcoins" in your computer?

Illustration on infrastructure construction and environmental regulations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cutting the red tape on infrastructure spending

President Trump's plan to accelerate improvements to America's infrastructure requires that the nation reform a "root cause" of delay in the implementation of public and private projects: Federal wetland regulation based on Section 404 of the Clean Water Act.

The Van Gogh that, perhaps, we didn't know

We occasionally hear about the discovery of a previously unknown artifact, such as a painting or musical composition. This revelation tends to lead to vigorous debates, disagreements and denials from experts in a particular field.