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Government Control of Broadband Services Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Government broadband signals heavier public debt

The rosy picture painted by proponents of government-owned broadband, like President Obama’s Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, couldn’t be more misleading.

Julaine Appling, president of Wisconsin Family Action, right, and her organization's attorney Mike Dean, defenders of Wisconsin's state ban on gay marriage, talk to reporters after attending a hearing before the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on the challenges to Indiana and Wisconsin's gay marriage ban Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Europe stands strong for traditional definition of marriage

A court decision issued last month about homosexual marriage received almost no news coverage in the United States, yet the decision could have significant implications when the U.S. Supreme Court decides whether the Constitution requires same-sex marriage.

Hong Kong Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hong Kong’s miraculous progress

How did this small city-state of 7.3 million people go from having a per-capita income of only a few hundred dollars per year to a per-capita income that is equal to that of the United States in only 50 years?

Labor Day Americana Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Labor Day, a misnamed holiday

No American holiday is as unusual as Labor Day. As legal holidays go, Labor Day isn’t very old.

The Left Attacking the Tea Party Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The mainstreaming of liberalism

One of the curious aspects of the Tea Party’s emergence during the past four years is the extent to which the mainstream media have fostered the idea that this political phenomenon represents a kind of radicalism.

Country Civility Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The source of civility

Even in the silence of the timeless Great Smoky Mountains, it’s nearly impossible to get away from the world’s aches and pains — not to mention horrors. The only way to do it is to unplug completely.

Chinese Threat to IT Development Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The frightening emergence of government patent trolls

When the Chinese government announced in April it was establishing a government-controlled patent-operations fund in April, there were few people besides Asian trade analysts who gave the news much attention.

Education Priorities Illustration By Donna Grethen

Transforming labor with school choice

This Labor Day, many Americans will use the holiday to wind down the summer, cook out with friends, or get a long weekend away.

FILE - This Aug. 28, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, before convening a meeting with his national security team on the militant threat in Syria and Iraq. President Barack Obama’s acknowledgement the U.S. still lacks a strategy for defeating the growing extremist threat emanating from Syria reflects a still unformed international coalition. The president will meet with his top advisers and consult members of Congress to prepare U.S. military options. At the same time, he is looking for allies around the world to help the U.S. root out the Islamic State group that has seized large swaths of territory in Syria and Iraq.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Barack Obama, the king of climate change

President Obama clearly believes that the Supreme Court, in its 2007 decision, Mass. v. EPA, empowered the president, via the Environmental Protection Agency, to unlimited regulations of greenhouse gases without the advice or the consent of Congress.

Mitt Romney

Another look at a savvy loser

- The Washington Times

Mitt Romney would defeat Barack Obama if they were matched again today. One or two polls say so. But they’re not matched today and a poll like that is only for a friendly conversation over a cup of coffee.

Related Articles

Remembering Washington in flames

The most famous firestorm to strike Washington, D.C., took place 200 years ago, when an uninvited, uniformed guest plopped into the speaker's chair in the U.S. Capitol's House of Representatives chamber on Aug. 24, 1814.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Thunder at Twilight'

This is one of those books that are as interesting for the way they read in perspective as for their intrinsic merits. American novelist Frederic Morton is a native of Vienna and his nonfiction works about it are without peer for their insight into its unique qualities.

Face-to-face with an evil enemy

There can be only one response to the barbaric beheading of American journalist James Foley by Islamic State terrorists. We must hunt them down and kill them.

Wising up to the Democrats' war on women

In June, Rep. Cory Gardner, Colorado Republican, told a roomful of friends at a Cory Gardner for Senate get-together that he was surprised to see his Democratic opponent, Mark Udall, running ads accusing him of banning birth control — since he had just picked up his wife's birth-control pills. Everybody laughed.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Russian Roulette'

In November 1917, soon after his Bolshevik faction seized control of Russia, Lenin called on the "oppressed masses" of Asia to follow Russia's example and throw off colonial rule.

Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol is surrounded by media after meeting with protesters Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer has touched off rancorous protests in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Media mantra misses the story as Ferguson explodes

Much of the media mantra in Ferguson, Missouri, followed a simple storyline. An 18-year-old black, known to his friends and family as a "gentle giant," planned to attend college the following week. As he walked down the street with his friend around noon Saturday, Aug. 9, he met a police officer who gunned him down as he tried to surrender with his hands held high.

Expensive Government Music Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A higher scale for music royalties?

Members of Congress are being pressured by lobbyists, songwriters and music-publishing executives to pass legislation artificially forcing copyright royalty rate increases on music.

FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2012 file photo, former Vice President Al Gore, Current TV Chairman and Co-Founder, participates in the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena , Calif. Former Vice President Al Gore is suing Al Jazeera America, saying the news network is withholding tens of millions of dollars that it owes for buying Current TV from him and other shareholders for $500 million last year. (AP Photo/Danny Moloshok, File)

EDITORIAL: Al Gore vs. Al-Jazeera

How do you say "buyer's remorse" in Arabic? The Qatari royal family likely feels the pangs of regret for paying the princely sum of $500 million to Al Gore and friends to give Al-Jazeera America a slot on satellite-TV and cable channels.