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Illustration on the value of the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Constitution, the great charter of liberty

When July 4 rolls around, there’s no mistaking it. There are fireworks, parades and other patriotic tributes to our Declaration of Independence. If you’re like most Americans, Sept. 17 comes and goes without any fanfare.

Illustration on climate, environmentalism and fuel supply by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Obama’s faulty climate-change solutions

President Obama boasted to the United Nations General Assembly last week that America is working hard to deal with what he called the “one issue that will define the contours of this century more dramatically than any other.”

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flynn, the three-star Army general who has headed the Defense Intelligence Agency for less than two years is being nudged aside amid conflict within the agency and between the general and leaders elsewhere in the intelligence community, a senior defense official said Wednesday, April 30. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

A promise to defend America on the cheap

- The Washington Times

Maybe President Obama is beginning to understand the Islamist threat against America. Maybe. If he does, we’ll owe a debt to the Americans who lost their heads to the barbarians. He still doesn’t understand what he has to do about it.

Illustration on gun control in Colorado by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Colorado’s Second Amendment wildfire

- The Washington Times

Last year, in the wake of the Sandy Hook school shootings in Connecticut, the Obama administration and then-New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg worked to put together a “coalition of the willing” to join them in a war on the Second Amendment and hit upon Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper as a likely recruit.

Pamona High School students Ciana Vrtikapa, left, and Tori Suyak engage with passing motorists in a busy intersection near their school, during a multi-school protest against a Jefferson County School Board proposal to emphasize patriotism and downplay civil unrest in the teaching of U.S. history, in Arvada, Colo., Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. Students from several high schools walked out of class Tuesday in the second straight day of protests in Jefferson County. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

‘A’ Is for agitation

There’s a big battle brewing in the Jefferson County, Colo., school system. The manufactured controversy over a proposed curriculum review is generating national headlines. But the fight is not about what misguided students and biased reporters say it’s about. “Censorship” is a red herring. The real issue is union control.

Illustration on government healthcare encouraging death after 75 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

If the government is paying the bill, it’s best to die young

Much is being made of Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel’s essay in The Atlantic, “Why I Hope to Die at 75,” where he argues that dying at 75 would be best for everyone. He’s entitled to his opinion, of course, but what makes this especially concerning is his role as an architect of the so-called “Affordable Care Act” (Obamacare).

Illustration on threats to West Virginia's coal industry by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

A tale of two West Virginias

Last month, West Virginia state Sen. Brooks McCabe, a Democrat, predicted that “as a leading energy state, West Virginia could create a future unimaginable heretofore.”

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy holds up a pen before signing new emission guidelines during an announcement of a plan to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030, Monday, June 2, 2014, at EPA headquarters in Washington.  In a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming, the Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday that cuts carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third over the next 15 years, but pushes the deadline for some states to comply until long after President Barack Obama leaves office. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

An opportunity to rein in the EPA

In the absence of action by Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken dramatic and unprecedented steps to craft energy policy in this country by issuing new regulations regarding carbon-dioxide emissions.

FILE - This March 25, 2014 file photo shows perforating tools, used to create fractures in the rock, lowered into one of six wells during a roughly two-week hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Corp. well pad near Mead, Colo. The energy boom is scrambling national politics. Democrats are split between environmentalists and business and labor groups. Some deeply-conservative areas are allying with conservationists against fracking, the technique largely responsible for the surge.  (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

Fracking is the answer to global warming

President Obama raised a lot of eyebrows here and abroad when he declared in his United Nations climate-change speech: “Over the past eight years, the United States has reduced our total carbon pollution by more than any other nation on Earth.”

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Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio was one of three Republicans that voted to end his party's filibuster of the energy efficiency bill. Mr. Portman, who co-sponsored the bill, called its defeat "yet another disappointing example of Washington's dysfunction."

The GOP's youthful Maverick PAC set to host Portman, Cruz, Priebus

- The Washington Times

The term "maverick" used to belong to Sen. John McCain back in the day. Now it's been expanded to represent a growing batallion of young, aggressive Republicans and conservatives who are ready to rumble, and in touch with their inner maverick, or words to that effect. Founded in 2009, Maverick PAC - or MAVPAC - now boasts 2,500 members. The group gathers Friday in the nation's capital for an annual conference that has attracted a stellar line-up of speakers.

Illustration on U.S. China relations by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Russia and China, masters of mischief

The international security meeting in Paris on Monday showcased a world in fear of the growing threat that the Islamic State poses to the global order.

FILE - In this Nov. 23, 2011 file photo, an American flag flies from the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The federal government ran a lower budget deficit in August 2014 than a year ago, remaining on track to record the lowest deficit for the entire year since 2008. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

It's not for frugal: Half of the U.S. Senate gets an F in 'fiscal performance'

- The Washington Times

Alas, almost half of the U.S. Senate has earned an F grade in "fiscal performance" according to the National Taxpayers Union's 35th annual rating of Congress. Indeed, 45 senators received the rock bottom grade on the scorecard, which analyzes their responses to every single roll call vote affecting federal taxes, spending, debt and significant regulations.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Virgin Way'

How do you institutionalize genius? Although this question is familiar to students of American government and military science, it is particularly elusive in business, where corporate leadership is often a contradiction in terms

Illustration on faulty global warming science by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Boycotting the U.N. climate summit

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has sensibly declined to attend yet another climate summit — this time called by Ban Ki-moon for Tuesday in New York under the auspices of the United Nations.

Adrian Peterson     Associated Press photo

Lessons from the Adrian Peterson case

I'm not a football fan, but everybody is having to watch a brilliant star being taken down and buried in a pile-up — his career jeopardized, his reputation in ruins.

David Brock, a former critic and later defender of Bill and Hillary Clinton, will head the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics. (associated press)

CREW cut: Washington's 'watchdog' hypocrisy

"Read my lips, no new taxes." "I did not have sex with that woman ... ." "If you like your plan, you can keep your plan." Saying one thing and doing another — it's the way of Washington.

Illustration on Americans' irritation with Obama by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Adding up the damage to America

Here are the dreary details on what's been happening in our nation's capital this week, but be forewarned: It isn't a pretty picture.

EDITORIAL: Why militarize the schools?

But peer pressure, bullying and ambition for good grades aren't the sort of minefield California's schools apparently fear most. They're getting ready for the real thing, deploying mine-resistant vehicles, or MRAPs, against the day an invading army lays a booby trap on the playground.