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FILE - In this March 22, 2014, file photo, former President Bill Clinton, left, listens as former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a student conference for the Clinton Global Initiative University at Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz. Clinton had long ago moved on from her bruising defeat in her 2008 presidential run. Clinton questioned whether the country was willing to give her family the White House for the third time. A less talked about concern was health, both hers and her husbands. The former president had undergone quadruple bypass surgery and had to make drastic lifestyle changes. Hillary Clinton would be 69 years old on Election Day, tying Ronald Reagan as the oldest American to be elected president if she won. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

The Clinton money-market account

- The Washington Times

If we can believe Hillary Clinton (and there’s no reason why anyone should), she and Bubba have gone from “dead broke” when they left the White House to accumulating riches that beggar Croesus, the ancient king of Lydia, and Midas, who was rich even before he started selling mufflers for Pontiacs and Chevys. Nevertheless, Hillary and Bubba are lining up now for seconds.

This image released by Vani Hari shows the food blogger among boxes of cereal in Charlotte, N.C. The former management consultant turned healthy-living activist has a best-selling book and an army of supporters. She deploys them regularly to move giants in the food industry via online petitions that, among other things, helped get Kraft Foods to give up artificial dyes in its macaroni and cheese. (Courtesy Vani Hari via AP)

The crusade of food bimbos

This week, Kraft Foods announced that it was changing the formulation of its famous macaroni and cheese. The company will remove food coloring after being the latest target of an online peasants-with-pitchforks campaign run by a blogger calling herself “The Food Babe.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, and Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., right,  head into the Senate Chamber on Cap[itol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 23, 2015, for the confirmation vote on the nomination of Loretta Lynch for Attorney General. Lynch won confirmation to serve as attorney general Thursday from a Senate that forced her to wait more than five months for the title and remained divided to the end.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Getting back to business

Anyone looking for signs that Barack Obama’s presidency is running out of gas got a glimmer of hope this week from his daily schedule.

Illustration on Holder's contempt for justice while attorney general by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A calculated corruptor of justice

The first attorney general to be held in contempt of Congress has demonstrated shocking contempt for the law, and the ability to abuse and corrupt it for the political and social agenda of this president.

Eric Holder’s legacy

As Attorney General Eric Holder finally departs, he leaves behind a demoralized Justice Department that has been politicized to an unprecedented degree.

Illustration on Eric Holder's history of pardoning and releasing terrorists by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In agreement with America’s enemies

Only days before President Obama’s inauguration in Jan., 2009, I was invited to testify at Eric Holder’s confirmation hearing regarding his engineering, as deputy attorney general, the infamous 1999 Clinton clemency grants to 16 unrepentant members of the Puerto Rican terror group, Armed Forces of National Liberation (FALN).

Justice driven by race illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Eric Holder’s legacy

Alas, the Eric Holder era is over. But critics who think his departure means normalcy will return haven’t been paying attention. Mr. Holder was President Obama’s point man for fundamentally transforming the country, and he did his job well.

Illustration on the adverse impact of five years of Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shreds of doubt about Obamacare

Last week’s tax-filing deadline was a little bit more complicated than in the past, thanks to Obamacare.

Illustration on Hillary and money questions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary’s hurdles

Nearly four months into the two-year presidential election cycle, Hillary Clinton is running into deep trouble on several major political fronts.

Wind mills work atop the mesa near Sterling City, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Financing Climate Crisis, Inc.

The Obama administration is using climate change to “fundamentally transform” America. It plans to make the climate crisis industry so enormous that no one will be able to dismantle it, even as computer models and disaster claims totally lose credibility — and even if Republicans control Congress and the White House after 2016.

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The little princess who could

Some people deserve to be remembered not because of any towering achievement, but simply because they did their best, sometimes rather clumsily, to make a positive contribution. Sophia Duleep Singh, daughter of the last maharajah of the Punjab, was such a person and Anita Anand's groundbreaking biography, thoroughly researched and written with considerable verve, does her subject full justice — and then some.

Stop Hillary campaign image from the Republican National Committee

Stop Hillary marketing victory: GOP generates $9.9 million in buzzworthy 'earned TV media'

- The Washington Times

There's a petition, a video, a flash drive and some nimble talking points - the Republican National Committee was quick to launch a well organized and imaginative effort to counter Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign. And it has paid off. "In three days, the RNC accumulated an impressive $9.9 million in earned TV media and 1,675 individual hits across TV and radio," Sean Spicer.

Illustration on steps that can be taken to constrain Iran's quest for nuclear weapons by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The means of coercing Iran

How would the prospects for stability in the Middle East be affected if Iran were to succeed in its effort to become a nuclear power? In what ways might we expect Iran to behave differently?

GOP sees opportunity illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

President Obama’s gifts to the Republicans

President Obama cannot make Congress irrelevant. Only Republicans — by mishandling their majority status — can make Congress irrelevant. After more than three frustrating months, congressional Republicans should remember this as they recalibrate for the next two years. While they may still lack the ability to enact their agenda, they have a great opportunity to package it and sell it between now and November 2016. Not only should they seize this opportunity, but by seizing it, they will greatly increase their chances of enacting their agenda in 2017.

Illustration on the California drought and its causes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A drought of common sense

Gov. Jerry Brown's recent proclamation that Californians must cut water usage by 25 percent certainly caught the attention of Californians and pundits nationwide. Featuring threats of fines of up to $500 per day, and even restrictions on personal shower habits, Mr. Brown wasted little time getting right to class warfare over our green lawns. Unfortunately, he and the ruling Democratic Party once again took a pass and resorted to draconian rationing measures and heavy-handed fees, while offering no leadership and no real solutions to California's current water crisis.

ACLU attacks on religious groups illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Battering religious freedom with abortion

In its latest attack on religious liberty, the American Civil Liberties Union, wants to force Roman Catholic organizations to provide contraception and abortions to unaccompanied immigrant children pouring over America's southern border.

Chart to accompany Moore article 04-13-2014

The redistribution racket

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren appeared on one of the late night talk shows last week, beating the class warfare drum and arguing for billions of dollars in new social programs paid for with higher taxes on millionaires and billionaires. In recent years, though, blue states such as California, Illinois, Delaware, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland and Minnesota adopted this very strategy, and they raised taxes on their wealthy residents. How did it work out? Almost all of these states lag behind the national average in growth of jobs and incomes.

How spying shaped modernity

In the wake of the turbulent French Revolution at the turn of the 18th century, crowns rattled atop nervous royal heads throughout Europe. Was beheading monarchs going to become a new continental pastime? Would democratic forces sweep aside regimes whose only claim to "legitimacy" was heritage?

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during his news conference at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama, Saturday, April 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Congress must do what Obama won’t

Americans reasonably expect their president to treat himself to an occasional session of introspection, to give himself a grade on whether he's living up to his oath to protect and defend the nation — to ask himself whether he has done anything wrong and if so, how to correct it. Alas, does anyone think it occurs to Barack Obama that he has ever done anything wrong?

This March 13, 2012 photo shows older and newly constructed 250,000 barrel capacity oil storage tanks at the SemCrude tank farm north of Cushing, Okla. (AP Photo/Tulsa World, Michael Wyke) KOTV OUT; KJRH OUT; KTUL OUT; KOKI OUT; KQCW OUT; KDOR OUT; TULSA OUT; TULSA ONLINE OUT

An oily blast from the past

Predictions of gloom and doom have been with us since before steam replaced sail on the high seas, putting thousands of galley slaves out of work. Panic has driven modern man, even in our own times, to extreme and unworkable solutions to problems manufactured in the heat of fright and alarm.

Still a 'community organizer' at heart

We elected President Obama as a statesman and leader. We didn't expect him to be a psychoanalyst and a mock priest. But on April 5 he told Thomas Friedman of The New York Times, "I think the biggest threats that they face may not be coming from Iran invading ... . It's going to be from dissatisfaction inside their own countries." So maniacs are driving themselves to decapitations and crucifixions?

Base Russia policy on current reality

I read with interest the piece reminiscing over the meeting of American and Soviet forces on the Elbe in 1945 ("When Americans and Soviets were comrades-in-arms," Web, April 2). Instead of looking at that meeting of our forces as a discrete, static event, some historical context may be useful. Perhaps if the Soviets had not invaded Poland with Germany and proceeded to provide material support to the Nazi war machine, assisting Hitler in avoiding the British naval blockade, such a historic meeting may never have been necessary.

Cover Image of the JVP April 2015 issue: Llallawavis-firmado; Artwork provided by H. Santiago Druetta

Fossil find: Skeleton of towering 'terror bird' found exquisitely preserved

- The Washington Times

It's a bodacious and big-beaked bird, that's for sure. Scientists studying the skeleton of an ancient South American terror bird called Llallawavis scagliai are describing it as "exquisitely preserved." Indeed, over 90 percent of the creature's bony structure is intact, revealing such details as voice box, trachea and the complete palate of a carnivorous predator which strolled the Earth some 3.5 million years ago.

Hillary Rodham Clinton. (Associated Press)

American Conservative Union is definitely not ready for Hillary: 'We've had enough'

- The Washington Times

Enough already. So say conservatives upon confronting the very real possibility that Hillary Clinton will soon announce her intention to run for the White House in 2016. Press reports indicate that she'll make the move on Sunday, possibly on Twitter. And possibly not. "Never before has a presidential candidate played so fast and loose with the truth as has Mrs. Clinton," said American Conservative Union chairman Matt Schlapp.

Calvin Coolidge

What do you properly call a Hillary?

- The Washington Times

We might be running out of things to be offended by. Feminists, gays and blacks have got so much of what they want that foolish people thought they might pipe down any day now, to let the rest of us rest while they reload.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks during the Iowa Agriculture Summit in Des Moines, Iowa, on March 7, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Critiquing the president

President Obama, still the college professor at heart, doesn't easily listen to criticism or argument. Only he knows what's what, and he grades on a steep curve. When Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin critiqued the deal the president is about to strike with Iran, the president retorted that the governor didn't know what he was talking about. He should "bone up" before he says anything, the president said.

FILE - In this April 2, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington about the breakthrough in the Iranian nuclear talks. Snap back? Not so fast. The biggest enforcement provision in the preliminary nuclear agreement with Iran is turning into one of its mostly hotly contested elements. And this debate barely involves Iran. Instead, it concerns the Obama administration’s promise to quickly re-impose sanctions on Iran if it cheats on any part of the agreement to limit its nuclear program to peaceful pursuits.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Iran nuclear deal undercuts Israel's security

One important aspect of the new nuclear agreement with Iran has been ignored altogether. This is the likely impact of the pact upon Israel's strategic nuclear posture. Although the Israeli bomb remains plainly nonthreatening, and in the metaphoric "basement," it is plausible to expect that many countries (both friends and foes) will soon call indignantly for the Jewish state's denuclearization.