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Members of the Oakland Raiders take a knee while others stand during the national anthem. (Associated Press)

Once upon a knee at the old ball game

- The Washington Times

There’s a lunatic in Asia credibly threatening the world with a hydrogen bomb. Congress can’t pull itself together to do anything. But enough of that. We’re all obsessed now with what a few tubby athletes think about the flag, the national anthem and the country others have shed blood and lives to defend and protect.

Illustration on the broken ideology of Socialism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

If oppression could inspire happiness

It is a fair bet that Sen. Bernie Sanders (and most of his followers), unlike tens of millions of others, never read George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” or Friedrich von Hayek’s “The Road to Serfdom.” Why do so many embrace a system — socialism — that has always failed, whether it was a form of state socialism or the various utopian communities started in the United States and Europe over the last couple of hundred years?

This Aug. 21, 2017, file photo shows members of the Cleveland Browns kneeling during the national anthem before an NFL preseason football game between the New York Giants and the Cleveland Browns in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, file)

NFL politics, a test for the media — and a solution

- The Washington Times

If NFL players have a right to on-field free expressions of speech, then that means pro-life players can take a knee during the playing of the national anthem to show solidarity with all the babies who could have been, save for America’s legal rubber-stamp of abortion.

Democrat Thumb on the Scale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fuzzy polls that trash Trump

- The Washington Times

How soon they forget. Heartened by a stream of poll data suggesting that the public is less than enamored with his performance as president, Donald Trump’s critics who’ve been taken in by polls before seem to think they have the man on the ropes.

Illustration on the Vietnam War     The Washington Times

The Vietnam War revisited

Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary “The Vietnam War” for the Public Broadcasting Service. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were a half-century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation.

The Al Gore Twister Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Alarmism in climate reporting

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, many members of the media and the political left have been quick to pin the blame for these storms on climate change. While there is no question that the hurricanes have wreaked havoc across many communities, including in my home state of Texas, these severe storms are not indicative of a climate trend — despite what the clickbait masters would have us believe.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen closes her notebook after answering questions during a news conference following the Federal Open Market Committee meeting in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Federal Reserve’s handwringing over low inflation

The Federal Reserve has been absolutely flummoxed that inflation has stayed so low for so long. Gasoline prices and headline inflation may be getting a temporary jolt from Harvey, but core inflation — consumer prices less energy and food costs — remains well below the Fed’s official target of 2 percent.

Illustration on the development of technology and political campaigning by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turning up the heat on America’s electioneering

Last year’s election signaled a change in American politics equal to that of the 1960s. The channel for this change was the medium — or rather, media — through which politics now flows. This change in media has brought an evolution in America’s method of communication, and transformed politics as well. The nation can extol it or lament it, but cannot escape it.

In this Sept. 22, 2017, photo President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Huntsville, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

A tax cut for all Americans

When you hear the phrase “corporate tax cut,” what do you picture? Middle-class workers, or Uncle Moneybags, the character from the Monopoly board game?

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Critics call Trump ‘self-interested’ like it’s a bad thing

- The Washington Times

As a businessman, a builder and a real estate tycoon in the most fiercely competitive real estate market on the planet, President Trump has spent his entire life exercising his own considerable self-interest. He built a huge and admirable fortune trying to make a buck for himself.

Illustration on the rise of materialism and anti-religious bigotry on Capitol Hill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hate, Bernie style

Two remarkable things unfolded last week. The Democrats openly embraced socialism in the form of single-payer health care. And they announced a secular, anti-Christian test for public office. The two go together like Abbott and Costello. Or better yet, since this is far from funny, Marx and Lenin.

Illustration on CIA use of drones by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The CIA’s drones fly into a storm

The Central Intelligence Agency’s authority to use lethal force is usually discussed only in the quietest corners of the intelligence community. These authorities are usually implemented pursuant to carefully-prescribed top-secret “presidential determinations” that authorize specific actions.

Justin Kandor Causing Trouble in New Hampshire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Some New Hampshire candor about Jason Kander

Let America Vote founder Jason Kander is a smirking menace. The former Missouri secretary of state wants to come to New Hampshire, cast aspersions on our elections, and use his wokeness as a springboard to bigger things.

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Illustration on American commercial and private air traffic by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

America's unfriendly skies

Liberals love to portray the Republicans as the party of the rich and powerful. The GOP has tried valiantly to shed that criticism, but then why are so many in the party defending the special interest favors that go to private and corporate jet owners over the interests of all the rest of us? Do Warren Buffett and LeBron James really need a taxpayer subsidy to jet across the country?

Boeing Looks in the Mirror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Boeing takes on a competitor

In the most recent quarter, Boeing reported profits well-ahead of analysts' expectations and increased its earnings projections for the full year. A large part of the profit was generated by record-high production rates on the 737 aircraft, and about a $530 million cash injection from 787 orders.

Illustration on The Washington Post's appraisal of Jeff Sessions' report on U.S. violent crime by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Post deserves these four Pinocchios

In a Sept. 1 "fact check," The Washington Post claimed to evaluate Attorney General Sessions' comments about rising violent crime in the United States. Specifically, this "fact check" is of Mr. Sessions' repeated statements that "violent crime is on the rise in America, especially in our cities."

The melancholy memoir of a little engine that couldn't

There are plenty of snappy titles that Hillary Clinton might have chosen for her personal account of the 2016 presidential race. "Born to Lose," "Running on Empty," "The Sun Also Sets" and "What a Way to Go" all spring to mind. "What Happened" does not. A question mark at the end might have helped. But then people could point to the name written in oversized capital letters directly under the title on the dust jacket, concluding that the answer to "What Happened?" was "Hillary Rodham Clinton."

FILE- In this Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump, center, gestures as he greets the Amir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah as he arrives at the White House in Washington. Kuwait says it will expel North Korea's ambassador and four other diplomats from its embassy in Kuwait City. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The art of no deal

Someone should lend Marc Short, the White House director of legislative affairs, a copy of President Trump's book, "The Art of the Deal." The president rightly rebuked his predecessor's negotiators and promised better ones in his own administration, but Mr. Short could use some tips. His suggestion last week that funding for the Mexican border wall doesn't necessarily have to be included in a compromise with Democrats over DACA is giving away the president's store.

Religious bigotry in the Senate

Dianne Feinstein is one of the few independent Democratic voices left in the U.S. Senate. She's a former mayor of San Francisco, and knows a nut when she sees one, and as the senior Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee she has learned things there that would sober anyone but the most dedicated peacenik.

Say thank-you to local eateries

Today, why not participate in National Cheeseburger Day? Ignore all health-food-police rants about how unhealthy hamburgers are and treat yourself by going to your favorite fast-food place, diner, restaurant or steak house and order a cheeseburger.

Obama still working from the shadows

Many leftists are still calling for President Trump's tax returns. This, of course, is just another ploy, like the Russian-collusion story, to try to get something on Mr. Trump that can be magnified and distorted.

City of Miami volunteers help residents fill free sandbags Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017, in Miami, as residents prepare for Hurricane Irma. A hurricane watch is now in effect for the Florida Keys and parts of South Florida. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

Hurricane Irma provides opportunity to expand, deepen faith in God

My heart pounded as the miraculous news about our home started to trickle in after Irma stormed across Florida. We received word from neighbors, who made it back to the tiny island where we live and work, that our home and vacation rental cottages had no significant damage. I can still scarcely believe these words as I write them.

Protesters shout before a speaking engagement by Ben Shapiro on the campus of the University of California Berkeley in Berkeley, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017. Several streets around the University of California, Berkeley, were closed off Thursday with concrete and plastic barriers ahead of an evening appearance by the conservative commentator - the latest polarizing event to raise concerns of violence on the famously liberal campus. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)

Scary times for free speech

- The Washington Times

Ben Shapiro just scored what today is becoming a major win -- a podium at a major university where police only had to make four protest arrests. Yes, that's sarcasm. It's also a sad commentary on the state of the First Amendment.

Illustration on zero sum approaches to tax reform and regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Toward real tax reform

The evening news and front pages are dominated by natural disasters. But our federal tax code is an unnatural disaster strangling America with long-term stagnation. To restore booming growth, America needs tax reform as proposed by President Trump and Republican Congressional leaders, who are virtually "singing off the same sheet."

Illustration on the potential for Trump's deal making by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The deals Trump must make

By dealing with Democrats to raise the debt ceiling and fund the government through December, President Trump has opened a window for bargains on taxes and infrastructure that could be attractive to both the administration and minority party in Congress.