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Constitutional Change in Turkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What Turkey’s referendum reveals

The outcome of the Turkish vote on constitutional changes, notwithstanding lingering allegations of fraud, represents further evidence of a crumbling global status quo.

Catching Illegal Voters Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting the right to vote

A jury of 10 women and two men in Tarrant County, Texas, found Rosa Ortega guilty of voting illegally and sentenced her to eight years in jail.

Illustration on the Trump dollar by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s dollar

President Donald Trump’s assertion this week that the “dollar is getting too strong” led to a sharp decline in the value of the greenback.

Illustration on the true intent of the Muslim Brotherhood by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Earning its terrorist designation

In an April 11 Brookings Institution report titled “Is the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization?” senior fellow Shadi Hamid states that the Trump administration’s proposed designation of the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist group “could have significant consequences for the U.S., the Middle East, and the world.”

Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times

The famous bimbo eruptions are back (as if they had ever really gone away), and for once Bubba appears to be in the clear. No new accusations of rude behavior have been lodged against him.

Illustration on a poll-driven view of America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Misleading polls and fake news

Newscasts continue to be filled with references to polling numbers that suggest President Trump and his policies are deeply unpopular, and that the American people overwhelmingly oppose the actions taken by America’s 45th president during his first 100 days in office.

The Non-biodegradable Plastic Bottle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How an overreaching FTC attacks the environment

The proliferation of plastic on land and in our oceans — plastic that can take hundreds of years to biodegrade — is among the most serious environmental issues in the world. As a consumer, wouldn’t you want to know about a plastic bottle that biodegraded in significantly less time?

Illustration on Trump's first 100 days by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

The president’s ongoing challenges

The Trump administration is still in the throes of getting its foreign policy act together, expressing conflicting messages on Russia, Syria and other troubles abroad as it nears the 100th day of his presidency.

Theresa May (The Washington Times illustration)

With unexpected crackle and snap, Theresa May becomes Theresa Will

Prime Minister Theresa May is giving herself a new identity. Suddenly she’s no longer “Theresa Maybe,” showing her mettle by moving toward Margaret Thatcher’s politics of the bold and unexpected. She still has a way to go to transform that mettle into the steel of the Iron Lady, but she may be on her way.

North Korean school girls react upon seeing their photograph being taken as they walk along Mirae Scientists Street on Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Tensions have spiked in recent weeks over North Korea's advancing nuclear technology and missile arsenal. But in Pyongyang, where war would mean untold horrors, few people seem to care much at all. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

What next with North Korea?

There was a moment at Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s White House briefing Monday that was significant. Asked by a reporter about North Korea’s missile launch last weekend, Mr. Spicer said the administration was aware of the launch and that “it failed.” End of story. Next question, please.

A woman collecting money for charity stands next to a quote written on an information board at Tower Hill underground train station, written in defiance of the previous day's attack in London, Thursday, in this March 23, 2017, file photo. On Wednesday, a man went on a deadly rampage, first driving a car into pedestrians then stabbing a police officer to death before being fatally shot by police within Parliament's grounds in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Charity keeps America free

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump’s senior advisers, deep in the weeds of tax reform, are reportedly looking at ways to save the middle class by placing more financial responsibilities on the shoulders of the wealthy — and part of the plan being discussed is to limit the level of deductions charitable organizations can take. This is the wrong way to go.

Emergence of Redneck Porn Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redneck porn

The 20th century gave us a good many new literary genres. Modernism, Futurism, Dadaism. Later on there was Post-modernism, Structuralism, Deconstruction. And now there’s a new literary genre: Redneck Porn.

Illustration on progressivism and government by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Apocalyptic liberalism

Shortly after the 2008 election, President Obama’s soon-to-be chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, infamously declared, “You never let a serious crisis go to waste.”

Related Articles

In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. Twitter users are poking fun at United's tactics in having a man removed from an overbooked Chicago to Louisville flight on April 9, 2017.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File) **FILE**

United Airlines and the golden age of airline deregulation

- The Washington Times

Blame Islamist terrorists and, yes, government airline deregulation for United Airlines' thuggish and bloody assault on a passenger on April 10. (Let the record show that for a decade I editorialized for deregulation and still think, within rational limits - I want a Food and Drug Administration -- the freer the markets the better for consumers and society in general.)

A European Union flag waves in the wind in front of the Chancellery in Berlin on Oct. 12, 2012. **FILE**

'Old Europe' sinks under the weight of secular progressivism

This week the existential problems facing the European Union came into stark relief as Belgium threatened Poland and Hungary with legal action if they did not agree to commit cultural suicide by letting in hundreds of thousands of "refugees" from the Middle East. This comes on the heels of Facebook-livestreamed rapes in Sweden, truck attacks in France and other Western European capitals, and jihadist bombs targeting the buses of famous soccer teams in Germany.

In this April 28, 2014, file photo, the Phoenix VA Health Care Center in Phoenix. The Veterans Affairs Department unveiled a new website Wednesday, April 12, 2107, aimed at providing information on the quality of care at VA medical centers, touting new accountability even as it grappled with fresh questions of patient safety in its beleaguered health system.  (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

Why can't we take care of our sick veterans?

- The Washington Times

A director at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C., was just removed from his post after a government watchdog blasted the facility for unsanitary conditions. But the director wasn't fired -- only demoted. And he wasn't even named in the VA's announcement of his demotion-- as if we're still trying to protect those who can't even protect our nation's most honorable.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to moderator Greta Van Susteren at the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, April 12, 2017, during "The President and the Press: The First Amendment in the First 100 Days" forum. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sean Spicer's humble apology a sign of good governance

- The Washington Times

The left is going batty over Sean Spicer's Hitler mishap, mocking and scoffing the White House press secretary for mistakenly stating the former Nazi leader "didn't even sink to using chemical weapons" against citizens or using "gas on his own people" the way Syria's President Bashar Assad did. But Spicer's humble rebound is commendable.

Higher Education Commissioner Joseph Rallo, center, answers questions from House budget committee members while Board of Regents Chairman Richard Lipsey, right, listens, on Wednesday, April 12, 2017, in Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte)

The GOP's best choice for education reform

Republicans in control in Washington have to decide whether to exert themselves on a range of issues to improve the economic and social conditions for millions of Americans or merely tinker at the margins with small-potato approaches.

Perils of the Rules of Engagement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When breaking the rules of engagement is right

Donald Trump and James Mattis came to office vowing to "win" America's wars again. But unless they change our politically correct military culture, it is certain America won't.

Executing the Guily and the Innocent Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Executing the guilty and innocent

Nearly three dozen men sit on death row in Arkansas, where capital punishment has been suspended since 2005. Unless clemency is granted, seven of them -- an eighth man was granted a temporary reprieve -- will be given lethal injections all within a 10-day period, between April 17 and 27.

Illustration on the pregnancy problem in the U.S. Navy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Love Boats sail again

Women can do most things as well as men. Almost nobody any longer disputes that. Women can do some things better than men. Many women thought Donald Trump as president would be a disaster for the final female assault on the glass ceiling. It hasn't turned out quite that way, and women, such as Nikki Haley and Betsy DeVos, have been stars of his new administration.

Ownership of the AR-15 Rifle Included in the Constitution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why the Second Amendment protects the AR-15

For decades the federal judiciary has been trying to interpret the Second Amendment out of the Constitution. It is, as Sanford Levinson has termed it, an "embarrassment" to an elite class of legal scholars that finds firearms to be unusual and repulsive objects. Now the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has declared that the semi-automatic AR-15 rifle is not covered by the Second Amendment, despite that fact that is the most common rifle sold in the United States. This execrable decision is the latest outrage in a long series of disingenuous judicial contortions.

Maximizing losses

As a macroeconomics student, I agree with Richard Berman ("Minimum wage resistance," Web, March 6). The basic idea behind the minimum-wage hike is good, but there are disadvantages that come with such a law.

The sailors' revolt that influenced an election

A consensus holds that last year's politics were messy; some say the messiest ever, but A. Roger Ekirch tells us otherwise. In 1800 the run-up to the nation's "first full-blown presidential campaign" was messier, and arguably more important in its long-term consequences, though only time can tell.

FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2017, file photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Promising to "expose the Republican Party for what it is," Sanders predicted April 12, that President Donald Trump would be a one-term president as the liberal icon prepared to launch a nationwide tour to rally Democrats. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Fizzler in Kansas, surviving hopes in Georgia

Congressional Democrats were counting on two special elections this month to provide the smelling salts to revive their dispirited ranks. The first, on Tuesday in Kansas, fizzled. Now all hope is focused on a reliably red district in the suburbs of Atlanta.