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Sebastian Kurz     Associated Press photo

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you’ve lost your mojo.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Oct. 17, 2017.

Schooling the U.S. on economic freedom

Once again, there is more evidence that economic freedom leads to success. Many of the former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have made enormous economic progress from the time they became free almost three decades ago.

Illustration on Richard Nixon's role in the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A faulty retelling of ‘The Vietnam War’

When Richard Nixon was in the White House, I was in Vietnam and he was my commander in chief. When I was on Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff, I had the opportunity to brief former President Nixon on numerous occasions and came to admire his analysis of current events, insights on world affairs and compassion for our troops. His preparation for any meeting or discussion was exhaustive. His thirst for information was unquenchable and his tolerance for fools was nonexistent.

Illustration on China's designs on the electric car market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The race for electric vehicle dominance

General Motors and Ford are scurrying to realign for what many believe are the next big things — driverless and electric vehicles (EVs) — but don’t look to Detroit, Japan or Germany for the mighty impulse that transforms personal transportation. With the world’s largest car market and savvy government policies, the advantage goes to China.

Illustration on NATO' difficult situation with member nation Turkey by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving NATO from Turkey

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, known as NATO, faces an existential problem.

A Game of Political Football Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican team with no offense

Is the Republican Party in trouble? The primary fight defeat in Alabama and the quick retirement signal by Sen. Bob Corker are not the only straws in the wind. Current polling shows Republicans trail Democrats by 8 percentage points in a generic 2018 House race.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route Greenville, S.C., for a fundraiser for South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Toward a better nuclear deal with Iran

To hear President Trump’s political opponents describe it, the decision to decertify the Iran Deal is a major miscalculation — a needlessly provocative action that could even bring all-out war.

While early voting may seem more convenient, it actually decreases turnout. (Associated Press/File)

Early voting disadvantages seem to outweigh benefits

Early voting — opening a limited number of locations where people can cast their ballots prior to Election Day — is a “reform” that states should reconsider. Its disadvantages seem to outweigh its benefits.

Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America’s trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump’s intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

Pope Francis, left, asperges incense in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

A step toward ending injustice in abortion

Human liberty and dignity notched a big win earlier this month. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is a landmark step adding further protections for the unborn by criminalizing abortions performed after 20 weeks into a pregnancy.

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Left's gun-law hypocrisy

As expected from the radical left, in the face of the tragic mass killings in Las Vegas the words of comfort to the grieving are rushed through to get to the usual political message about guns and the gun lobby. Forgive me, but I would like to offer another view on the subject of taking away our gun rights in order to stop senseless killing.

From left, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen, sing together during a National Prayer Service at the National Cathedral, in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A mandate for religious freedom

Not so long ago, President Trump's new guidelines for the Department of Health and Human Services for protecting freedom of religious faith would have been superfluous and unnecessary. A casual observer might have read them in puzzlement, as if the government had reaffirmed its opposition to robbery or murder.

Donald Trump's new guidelines for protecting religious faith restore justice

The Washington Times

Not so long ago, President Trump's new guidelines for the Department of Health and Human Services for protecting freedom of religious faith would have been superfluous and unnecessary. A casual observer might have read them in puzzlement, as if the government had reaffirmed its opposition to robbery or murder.

EMP-burst danger not news

In "Congress seeks IG probe of radio" (Web, Oct. 4) Bill Gertz highlights aspects of a report produced by the Energy Department and the Electric Power Research Institute. The report concludes that more needs to be done to understand and respond to the electronic magnetic pulse (EMP) threat.

How Reagan was heir to the New Deal

It's true that Ronald Reagan began his political career in Hollywood as a Democrat, albeit a Democrat who fought the pervasive Communist influence in the screen unions of the day. And he would also campaign enthusiastically for Harry Truman, who was opposed by Henry Wallace, FDR's former vice president, and his Communist-tainted Progressive Party.

Participants in the Columbus Day Parade ride a float with a large bust of Christopher Columbus in New York. A movement to abolish Columbus Day and replace it with Indigenous Peoples Day has new momentum but the gesture to recognize victims of European colonialism has also prompted howls of outrage from some Italian Americans, who say eliminating their festival of ethnic pride is culturally insensitive, too. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Columbus deserves his day

- The Washington Times

In this era of Making America Great Again, it is true and wonderful to celebrate this great and glorious holiday and sing high praises for the good and daring adventurer who discovered America.

In this May 4, 2017, photo John Simpson, left, project director of exhibitions for The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum, and his wife Kay Simpson, right, president of Springfield Museums, unwrap a statue of the "Cat in the Hat," at the museum, in Springfield, Mass. The museum devoted to Dr. Seuss, which opened on June 3 in his hometown, features interactive exhibits, a collection of personal belongings and explains how the childhood experiences of the man, whose real name is Theodor Geisel, shaped his work. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Dr. Seuss character incredulously deemed racist

- The Washington Times

Is nothing sacred any longer? A Massachusetts museum that was created in honor of Dr. Seuss is under fire for a mural of a Chinese character from one of his books that critics say is stereotypical to the point of offensive.

President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing with Senior Military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. Sitting on the left is Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump dumped on by ex-NBCer, who accuses anti-Semitism

- The Washington Times

Russia collusion it ain't, but the next scandal that appears to be looming over the White House involves a former NBC producer and his claim that President Donald Trump has been captured on camera making a number of "unfathomably despicable" racist, sexist and anti-Semitic comments.

In this Sept. 13, 2017, file photo activists of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) protest against the conflict between North Korea and the USA with masks of the North Korean ruler, Kim Jong-un, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump, right, in front of the U.S. Embassy in Berlin, Germany. (Britta Pedersen/dpa via AP)

Donald Trump -- decertify

- The Washington Times

Come Oct. 15, President Donald Trump may decertify the Iran nuclear deal, leaving Republicans in Congress to figure out how to manage the nuclear designs of the rogue nation. Trump should. Decertify away. The pact is nothing but a false hope of the previous administration.

Illustration on the controversy over Columbus Day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Even worse than the Monday-holiday scheme

If you're confused that Columbus Day this year is not celebrated on the date mandated by historical fact, you're not alone. The holiday has sometimes been celebrated on the wrong day, even before Congress included Columbus Day in its Monday-holiday scheme in 1969.

President Donald Trump listens to Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo during a meeting with first responders at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, in Las Vegas. Associated Press photo

With neither bombast nor bravado, a presidential president

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump promised in his barnstorming campaign for president, with bombast and bravado, that once elected he would tone everything down and be "presidential." He was elected and we learned that, candidate or president, the Donald doesn't do presidential.

Nuclear Deal with Nobody Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why the U.S. should withdraw from the Iran deal

There is a season for acceptance and a season for rejection. When it comes to compliance with the Obama nuclear weapons deal, it is time to withdraw completely at the congressionally mandated October 15 certification deadline.

Investigators load a body from the scene of a mass shooting at a music festival near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip on Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

The Las Vegas massacre

The investigation into the Las Vegas mass murderer who killed at least 58 people and wounded nearly 500 in a hail of gunfire is still searching for a motive in the massacre.

Vice president Mike Pence takes the stage to deliver remarks before assisting volunteers working on the relief effort for the Puerto Rico victims of Hurricane Maria, at the Iglesia de Dios church in Kissimmee, Fla., Thursday, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. (Joe Burbank /Orlando Sentinel via AP)

No snakes in the grass

Sexual harassment is tacky and vile, ranging from a wink and a nod (usually a misdemeanor) to brute force (always a felony), and such misbehavior has been with us since Adam and Eve ruined paradise when Eve had an affair with a snake -- a real one, not the snake in the grass that can bedevil mere friendships.

President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing with senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The humiliation of the snobs

One rare nugget of good news from the roiling, boiling cauldron of controversy about everything is that there's a new recognition of the Constitution. Many Americans, ignorant of the how and why of the founding document, have learned, sometimes to their frustration, that it's relevant, after all.