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Illustration on examining voter fraud by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rooting out vote fraud

Judging by the unhinged reaction this past week to the first public meeting of President Trump’s blue-ribbon voter fraud panel, progressives are terrified.

Iranian Intentions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Certifiably wrong about Iran’s compliance

During President Trump’s campaign he said that Mr. Obama’s 2015 nuclear weapons deal with Iran was the “worst deal ever.” Although there are many diplomatic deals vying for that title, the deal engineered by Mr. Obama is at least one of the worst ever for two reasons.

How to fix the Obamacare fiasco

It’s no grand revelation that Republicans have bungled the Obamacare repeal bill beyond belief. Sen. Mitch McConnell wants a Senate vote on full repeal of Obamacare with two years to come up with a replacement. This would be the ideal solution, but it appears he lacks the necessary 50 votes for passage.

In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, an F-15C Eagle from the California Air National Guard, 144th Fighter Wing, flies out of the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Restoring the military’s moral underpinnings

The Trump administration came to power with a clear mandate to restore U.S. military credibility, effectiveness, and capabilities. Such a mandate involves reversing not only the debilitating impact of sequestration on our declining military force structure, but also the Obama administration’s social engineering mandates forced on our military.

Misdirected Canadian Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Time

The travesty of rewarding a terrorist

In July 2002, Omar Khadr was accused of throwing a hand grenade and killing a U.S. Army combat medic, Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer, on the battlefields of Afghanistan. Khadr was ultimately captured, linked to al Qaeda (reportedly through his father’s connections), pled guilty, and sat in a Guantanamo Bay jail cell before being repatriated by Canada in 2012.

Robert Mueller. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump’s promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can’t continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it’s also the responsibility of Congress.

Turkey and NATO Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

NATO alliance helping dictators

President Trump found NATO wanting. Then true to form, he acted like a CEO, not a president, serving notice that things had to change, or else. The “or else” he left undefined, creating angst among politicians and policy elites who, sensing their own failures, chose to focus on his manners not his message. Mr. Trump’s poor political decorum notwithstanding, his policy judgment is right. NATO has to change.

Amazon Busts Through the Bricks and Mortar Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Embracing disruption and reinvention

In every age, civilizations embrace technologies that disrupt the status quo. Amazon and its internet brethren may be menacing to brick and mortar establishments but only because they make our lives richer and easier — and there is nothing new about engineers and entrepreneurs doing that.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump greets workers during a visit to the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. More than 300 Carrier Corp. workers were being laid off Thursday, July 20, 2017, from the company's Indianapolis factory as part of an outsourcing of jobs to Mexico that drew criticism last year from then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The benefit of putting health care aside

“It ain’t over till it’s over,” Yogi Berra said in his famous aphorism about losing. And that may eventually apply to the Republicans’ failed attempt to “repeal and replace” President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare.

President Donald Trump listens during a "Made in America," roundtable event in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump facing most hostile press coverage in history

Over and over again, I, and many others, have stated that President Donald Trump has received the most hostile press coverage of any sitting president in U.S. history. Democrats laughed and claimed that former President Barack Obama was treated worse, but the facts don’t lie.

Illustration contrasting Trump supporters and opponents by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The great American divide

You could call it the tale of two election reflections, two competing points of view, two American perceptions of out-of-focus reality. Two important liberal voices “looked back” this week at the November election to try to figure out how and why Donald Trump, whom “everybody” despised and “nobody” wanted to win, actually did.

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its “2017 Congressional Pig Book,” an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress.

The Capitol in Washington is quiet after lawmakers departed the for the Independence Day recess, Friday, June 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Republicans, thy name is mud

- The Washington Times

Republicans, as a party, are reeling at their most recent failure — an epic one — regarding repeal-replace Obamacare. Stumbling seems to be Republicans’ new mode of transportation. What’s insanely angering about it is they’re stumbling over their own roadblocks.

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Franklin Graham speaks with dignitaries, including U.N. Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq Lisa Grande, at the Samaritan's Purse field hospital on the Plains of Nineveh in Iraq. Image courtesy of Samaritan's Purse.

Franklin Graham's right -- 'socialized medicine' sucks

- The Washington Times

Worldwide evangelist Franklin Graham cut to the chase about the Charlie Gard vs. Government life-and-death case that's being played out in U.K. courts right now, putting it plainly that parents ought to have the final say over their infants' health care -- not bottom-line bureaucrats feeding into their socialist system. In other words: Socialized medical care sucks.

President Donald Trump gives the thumbs-up as he and first lady Melania Trump board Air Force One, Wednesday, July 12, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route to Paris. President Donald Trump and France's Emmanuel Macron may be the world's most unlikely political odd couple. Far apart on climate change and immigration, the two leaders will look for common ground on terrorism and defense policy when they meet in Paris. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump impeachment article brought to House -- LOL

- The Washington Times

Reps. Brad Sherman of California and Al Green of Texas have brought forward a formal article of impeachment against President Donald Trump for "high crimes and misdemeanors." There's a story about monkeys here that seems applicable.

Illustration on young people in the age of social media information by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Digitally savvy' and at the mercy of media fakers

When President Trump defended his use of social media as not simply "presidential" but "modern day presidential," he had a point. If George Washington, John Adams or Thomas Jefferson wanted to get a personal message duplicated for the public to read, it took at least 24 hours to get it printed (even when their friends owned the presses.)

Illustration on Iraq/ Kudistan relations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Negotiating an amicable split

Iraqi security forces with the support of coalition forces are finally getting close to defeating ISIS in Iraq, which begs an important question: What comes next? More to the point, what governmental structure would best protect the many ethnic groups that live there?

Illustration on western conservative values by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Making goodness fashionable

There are conservatives, and then there are Western conservatives. Western conservatives think differently about the world. Our wisdom, forged in hard work and steeled by grit, helped settle the West and could provide some much-needed common sense to the rest of the nation.

Illustration on the Northwest Ordinance by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The early American document that enlarged the nation

There are three remarkable early American documents. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution readily come to mind, but few Americans are aware of the Northwest Ordinance, passed on July 13 230 years ago by the Second Continental Congress.

Illustration on North Korea and world reaction to Kim's threats by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Confronting North Korea by changing the dynamics

On July 4, North Korea successfully test-fired the equivalent of an intercontinental ballistic missile with the potential to hit not only our regional allies but Alaska as well. Leading up to the latest test, President Trump, regrettably, has followed the path of the five previous administrations, believing that cozying up to China's communist government would be helpful in reining in North Korea's nuclear weapons program.

This is an undated photo of sick baby Charlie Gard provided by his family, taken at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London. A British court will assess new evidence Monday July 10, 2017, in the case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard as his mother pleaded with judges to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment for his rare genetic disease, mitochondrial depletion syndrome. (Family of Charlie Gard via AP)

The state is not God

Anyone looking for another reason not to leave life-and-death issues to the state need look no further than the conflict between the British government and the parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard.

The Gilded Age versus the Gelded Age

David Callahan is worried. He sees America headed toward a period of ever-growing influence by the super rich: a new Gilded Age dominated by men and women of wealth, especially those who are interested in giving away -- as well as amassing -- their wealth.

This is a Feb. 2017 image of the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica made available by the Antarctic Survey on Wednesday July 12, 2017. A vast iceberg with twice the volume of Lake Erie has broken off from a key floating ice shelf in Antarctica, scientists said Wednesday. The iceberg broke off from the Larsen C ice shelf, scientists at the University of Swansea in Britain said. The iceberg, which is likely to be named A68, is described as weighing 1 trillion tons (1.12 trillion U.S. tons). (British Antarctic Survey via AP)

Confronting the temperature taboo

The New York Times has discovered peril in the Arctic. "Explorers and fishermen find climate moderating about Spitzbergen and the Eastern Arctic," the newspaper reports, and seal hunters and explorers who sail those icy seas "point to a radical change in climactic conditions, and hitherto unheard of temperatures in that part of the earth."

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama talks with Russia's President Vladimir Putin at the opening session of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) in Lima, Peru. When U.S. and Russian presidents meet, the rest of the world stops to watch. For decades, summits between leaders of the world powers have been heavily anticipated affairs in which every word, handshake and facial expression is scrutinized. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Arsonists to put out the fire

Barack Obama is back at last from his new career of hanging out with the 1-percenters, eager to headline a big-dollar fundraiser for the National Democratic Redistricting Committee at a private home in Washington. The Democratic Party has all but disappeared in many state capitols, but where's there's a pulse, there's wan hope.

Health reform about money, power

Through the years, various iterations of Congress and numerous presidents have developed a power grab through the two-party adversarial system, which provides a lifestyle of comfort for the political class. America has gone from a representative republic to a government of self-proclaimed, all-knowing, tin gods whose only interest is the self-preservation of their power and lifestyle.