Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Growing the American Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to jump-start the economy

As the presidential debates get underway, we hope that the moderators set personalities aside and spend some quality time asking questions of both candidates about their plans to grow the American economy.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Terrorism, refugees and Donald Trump

Hilary Clinton’s refugee plan is an open invitation for Radical Islam’s unyielding nature to run roughshod over American culture.

Federal Land Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grinding westerners under the federal boot

The federal government owns an estimated one-third of all the land in the United States. But this is only a rough estimate, because even the federal government does not actually know how much land it controls.

Illustration on the contrasting media coverage of Hillary and Trump by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The apoplectic liberals

- The Washington Times

Is it journalistic malpractice to quote each side of the argument and leave it to readers to draw their own conclusions?

A study in nuclear contrast

Astudy in contrast: North Korea is killing itself to get an atomic bomb; Kazakhstan is rich because it gave its nukes away.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we’re getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It’s a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Illustration on two possible economic futures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Liars, statistics and politics

This presidential season Americans have been treated to the usual outrageous campaign promises and extraordinary candidate alibis about past transgressions, but those pale in comparison to claims about gains in family incomes served up by the Obama administration last week.

Fifteen years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 2,976 American flags were displayed in memory of each person who died. Families of the victims say they have waited long enough and want legislation granting them the right to sue Saudi officials who they say are culprits. (Associated Press)

Americanism over transnationalism

Throughout this presidential campaign we’ve heard many liberals and neoconservatives carp against the nationalism espoused by Donald Trump and condemn how nationalism continues to resonate among tens of millions of regular Americans. Elitists and media messengers likewise express horror when Mr. Trump announces that in all matters, be they domestic or foreign, his policy and attitude will be “America first.”

Illustration on Obama's exit before the consequences by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

War clouds are gathering

This summer, President Obama was often golfing. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were promising to let the world be. The end of summer seemed sleepy, the world relatively calm.

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2016 file photo, handguns are displayed at the Smith & Wesson booth at the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show in Las Vegas. Nearly two-thirds of Americans expressed support for stricter gun laws, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll released Saturday, July 23, 2016. A majority of poll respondents oppose banning handguns. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Why millennials are skeptical of gun control

For the mediaocracy and pundit class, determining the opinions of millennials on all sorts of topics is the great 21st-century parlor game. And it seems that nothing confuses them more — or upsets them, for that matter — than when forced to confront millennial attitudes about guns.

Illustration on Obama Cabinet members violations of the Hatch Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Partisan politics in the Cabinet

The Obama administration repeatedly allows senior officials to unlawfully meddle in politics without being held accountable. In just the latest incident, Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Julian Castro in July was found to have violated a law designed to ensure that federal officials work on behalf of all Americans, not their political party.

Related Articles

Democratic vice presidential candidate, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va. gestures as he arrives for a campaign rally at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich., Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Roosting with Hillary's chickens

Hillary Clinton's pneumonia, being of the bacterial and not the viral persuasion, is apparently not contagious. It's safe to shake her hand and share a cough. But the panic afflicting the Democrats is clearly contagious. Panic is Hillary's most obvious contribution to the 2016 race. She sees handwriting on the wall, and it's a warning writ large that something is gaining on her.

Illustration on the Papal view of materialism, religious ideology and violence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The end of ideology?

Historical materialism, a theory popularized by Karl Marx and further developed and refined by others, holds that humanity progresses through stages to a class-free society. For Marxists, the course of history is best appreciated through a scientific lens, with class struggle inevitably leading to a communist future.

The cost of better gas mileage

The roadside cross, displaying a name, perhaps plastic flowers and sometimes a teddy bear attached with duct tape, is a symbol of the broken hearts left behind by someone who died on that spot. After years of declining traffic fatalities, the number of lives lost on the nation's roads and highways is rising again.

The Fargo VA Medical Center in Fargo, seen Thursday, April 2, 2015, is the main hospital for the North Dakota VA health care system, which includes community-based outpatient clinics in Bismarck, Devils Lake, Dickinson, Grafton, Grand Forks, Jamestown, Minot and Williston. In an analysis of six months of appointment data at 940 VA hospitals and clinics nationwide from September 2014 to February 2015, The VA medical system in North Dakota has managed to keep appointments for most military veterans on a timely schedule, despite the challenge of recruiting doctors to the mostly rural state. (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack)

A prescription for better veterans' medical care

When a 12-month-old boy arrived at a rural Arizona emergency room last year, a nurse practitioner diagnosed his life-threatening infection. The child desperately needed intravenous fluids, but the available doctors were not trained in an advanced ultrasound technique used to place a life-saving IV line called a "central line" into his tiny arm and leg veins.

Good Judge Bad Judge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Clinton win would ensure the most liberal Supreme Court in 80 years

The outcome of this November's election will determine the direction of the Supreme Court for a generation. The next president will have at least one, and as many as four or five, vacancies to fill. There is no more important issue in this election than the Supreme Court.

Illustration on the US/Turkey alliance by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turkey's critical anti-terror role

As the global fight against terrorism continues, Turkey has become America's most critical geopolitical ally in the fight against the Islamic State and other dangerous terrorist organizations.

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2014 file photo, the State Department is seen in Washington. Ahead of Sundays 15th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, the State Department is reminding U.S. citizens about threats around the world and urging Americans to be vigilant about their personal security. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez, File)

Slow-walking in Foggy Bottom

Whether Hillary Clinton wins the White House in November or is sent back to one of her estates to recover her health, it's unlikely that handling emails at her old shop at the State Department will ever be the same. The growing list of scandals over her misuse of electronic communications has trained a spotlight on the system's failures that she shamelessly exploited.

Obama's non-stick IRS

Who knew that ensuring fair and lawful tax collection was so problematic? Internal Revenue Service agents recently admitted to delaying tea party and other conservative group applications for tax-exempt status, and composing non-standard questions for those applicants ("IRS refuses to abandon targeting criteria used against tea party, conservative groups," Web Sept. 7).

The cult of global warming

In 2015 the World Economic Forum had a prophetic vision that unless the world mended its wicked ways, "global warming will become catastrophic and irreversible." This past July U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry claimed that global warming was as dangerous to the world as Islamic terrorism.

Illustration on the root of Detroit's troubles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's bad aim in Motown

The 2016 presidential circus made a brief stop here Labor Day weekend as Motown became the latest backdrop in another chapter of Trumpian bogeymen and media gotcha.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a rally at Johnson C. Smith University, in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Miserables, deplorables and loose tongues

Hillary Clinton is the pluperfect wonk. She grooves on the trivia of policy and conversations with whoever carries a checkbook. But she doesn't understand campaign politics and has no appreciation of the fine points of the game she insists on trying to play.