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Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

The deadly impact of identity politics

In the aftermath of the horror of the Charlottesville riot, there’s been less condemnation by the media and the left of the neo-Nazi that is charged with murdering Heather Heyer and injuring at least 19 others than there has been of President Trump.

Illustration on the need for a U.S. comprehensive peace strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

In search of a grand U.S. strategy

Richard Nixon’s rapprochement with China, the end of the Cold War, President Obama’s outreach to “the Muslim world,” the growth of the (largely American-funded) United Nations — weren’t such developments supposed to lead to a safer world, one in which the “international community” would embrace “universal values” and pursue common interests — peace and security key among them?

Illustration on CNN and "the moron vote" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Controversy at a pious cable news outlet

Last week CNN fired Jeffrey Lord, its famously pro-Trump contributor, for mocking an activist whom The Daily Caller has reported as a racist and an anti-Semite. Mr. Lord addressed him with the salutation, “Sieg Heil!” What is wrong with that? Is CNN covering for racists and anti-Semites?

Illustration on U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

A new strategy for Afghanistan: change course, quit the fight

It has been reported in recent days that President Trump has angrily rejected the latest recommendation from his national security staff for a new Afghan war strategy. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, in other venues, has claimed the reason for the delay is that forming strategy is “hard work.”

A man casts his vote at a polling place Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Provo, Utah. The winner of a three-way Republican primary, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Utah will become the favorite to win the November special election and fill the congressional seat recently vacated by Jason Chaffetz. Republicans outnumber Democrats five-to-one in Utah's 3rd Congressional District, which stretches from the Salt Lake City suburbs and several ski towns southeast to Provo and Utah coal country. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Resisting election integrity

The Election Integrity Commission will resume its work in September, now that the frivolous lawsuits against it are, one by one, being dismissed. The most recent case is in New Hampshire, where the American Civil Liberties Union has dropped a case over sharing publicly available voter information with the commission. The Granite State compromised and will comply. More states are beginning to come around.

Illustration on a possible North Korean EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The other North Korean threat

After massive intelligence failures grossly underestimating North Korea’s long-range missile capabilities, number of nuclear weapons, warhead miniaturization, and proximity to manufacturing a hydrogen bomb, the biggest North Korean threat to the United States remains unacknowledged.

Benjamin Franklin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A riot with an unwelcome lesson

- The Washington Times

The media mob wasted no time in descending on Charlottesville, and the first order of business was to exploit the bigotry, tragedy and evil to make it the work of the Republicans, conservatives, and above all, Donald Trump.

President Donald Trump walks across the tarmac to board Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. Trump is traveling back to Washington to sign an executive order at the White House and then later today travels to New York City. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump on Charlottesville: Danged if he does, danged if he doesn’t

- The Washington Times

The immediate aftermath of the widely reported Charlottesville violence wasn’t so much a media look at the issues, or the car-plowing suspect and victims, or even the demographics of the protesters — that many came from out of state to stand strong against a small-town statue of Robert E. Lee — as it was a cause to criticize President Donald Trump. But why all the angst against the president?

Illustration on white supremacist groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tragedy in Charlottesville

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the “one-drop rule,” codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered “black.” I wonder what we’d learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the “white nationalists” who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup?

Illustration on the challenge for Trump posed by North Korea by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

Making the best of a bad nuclear hand

- The Washington Times

That so many of the nation’s leading Democrats believe President Trump poses a greater threat to world peace than the mad dog leader of a nuclearized North Korea says more about them than either the president or Kim Jong-un.

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Juche’ or consequences

“Juche” — the ideology of North Korea — compels unquestioned obedience to the “supreme leader,” who is exalted as the greatest source of political thought. It is enforced by fear and murder even among the elite and accounts for the Kim regime’s paranoia and belligerence.

The USS Gerald Ford         U.S. Navy

‘A 100,000-ton message to the world’

As an old Navy man who served as a young enlisted sailor on the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk during the Vietnam War, I was pleased and proud to see the U.S. Navy’s newest aircraft carrier, the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), join America’s fleet.

Related Articles

In this combination photo, director Spike Lee, left, appears at the premiere of "Touched With Fire" on Feb. 10, 2016, in New York and San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick appears at a news conference on Jan. 1, 2017, after an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks in Santa Clara, Calif. On Aug. 8, 2017, Lee tweeted an advertisement for an Aug. 23, 2017, rally for Kaepernick outside the NFL's New York City headquarters. (AP Photo/Files)

Colin Kaepernick, so bad he needs a rally

- The Washington Times

Colin Kaepernick is in a bit of a bind. He used to be a quarterback of somewhat high esteem with the 49ers. But that was pre-2016. Now football fans know him as struggling and unsigned -- and non-football fans know him as the guy with the 'fro who despises his country so much he spent a significant portion of 2016 kneeling during the playing of the national anthem.

In this April 6, 2017, file photo, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Hillary Clinton, the wanna-be preacher

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton wants to be a spiritual leader. That's right. Post-epic election fail, the woman whose face and name have become synonymous with Political Scandal wants to reinvent with religion. Odd? Well, consider this: There is a lot of money to be made in the selling of God's word.

In this file photo taken Jan. 28, 2017, President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ** FILE **

Trump's 200 days short on GOP support

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's administration, just rounding the corner into 200 days of leadership, has fallen short of realizing a key campaign promise, the repeal of Obamacare. Thanks go to Republicans for that failure.

In this Friday, Aug. 4, 2017, file photo, Venezuela's Constitutional Assembly poses for an official photo after being sworn in, at the National Assembly in Caracas, Venezuela. The Constitutional Assembly is expected to meet again on Tuesday, Aug. 8, and despite growing international criticism, Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro has remained firm in pressing the body forward in executing his priorities. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos, File)

The insurance compulsion

Venezuela is the latest global disaster caused by socialism. Over the last couple of hundred years, virtually every variety of socialism has been tried -- from communism to national socialism (Nazism) and fascism, to various varieties of "democratic socialism" -- with one common characteristic -- they all failed.

Illustration on unreliable alternate power by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The high cost of unreliable power

The climate obsessions of the Obama administration yielded a substantial myopia with respect to the other central goals of energy policy, the cost and reliability of the electric power system in particular.

Illustration on the deteriorating Venezuela situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The coming collapse of Venezuela

- The Washington Times

As U.S. policymakers fret about Syria, Afghanistan, Ukraine and North Korea, far too little attention is being paid to the powder keg to the south of us that may be about to blow. Once-prosperous Venezuela has been coming apart for years, but the roundly condemned Constituent Assembly election engineered by presidential strongman Nicolas Maduro lit the fuse that could ignite a civil war in his country. With a Sunday attack by uniformed insurgents on a military base, the internecine battle may have already begun.

Illustration on PETA's attempts at insinuating itself into the Trump administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dogging the Trumps

This past weekend saw the annual Animal Rights Conference take place just outside our nation's capital. The event is a who's who of activists from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the Humane Society of the United States, and like-minded groups that converge to discuss tactics for getting rid of meat, ice cream, circuses, zoos, aquariums, leather belts and silk shirts.

Former Vice President Al Gore. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When life gets tough for just about everybody

- The Washington Times

Life is tough, as the man said, and three out of three people die. It's apparently a lot worse than we thought. The world is coming apart at the seams, just like the naysayers said it would. Times have got so tough that you can't even trust fake news.

Confirmation of Christopher Wray as FBI Director Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A steady hand in an unsteady time

The FBI is the premier investigative agency in the world, with more than 35,000 agents and staff working all around the globe. The men and women of the FBI work diligently to disrupt and prevent terrorist attacks on America and to preserve the liberties of all Americans by upholding and enforcing the rule of law.

A famed novelist and his fatal hubris

You've really got to respect a novelist's biographer who begins his book with a quote like this from its subject: "Scott Fitzgerald once wrote, 'There never was a good biography of a novelist. There couldn't be. He is too many people if he is any good.' "

Get rid of RINOs

We currently have a small number of RINOS blocking the president's agenda — and the leadership does nothing. It's time play hardball, stop the talk and take action. First, strip those RINOS of their influential committee and chairmanship assignments. Second, let them know that there will be no Republican funds for them when they run for reelection. Lastly, change the archaic rules of the Senate and let those who oppose know we won, you lost. President Obama did it.

Empower states to end Obamacare

I have followed Obamacare since its inception and now realize its purpose was to empower the federal government with our health care. That didn't work because it violated the Constitution. To reverse Obamacare, the Republicans must do the opposite: empower the states. That should be the premise and theme of the Republican health-care bill.

Trying again with secession

If at first you don't succeed, secede. That's the latest message from California, where the idea of breaking up with the United States is the current rage. With Donald Trump in the White House attempting to "make America great again," the idea of returning to an era of freedom, faith and family is as antithetical to the cool crowd as a blue-light special at Kmart. The farther the Left Coast travels down the road toward "Calexit," the harder the climb back into the good graces of Americans for whom California is not as cool as it once was.