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North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare

In 2015 the Intelligence Community declassified The 1983 Soviet “War Scare” — the definitive report by the president’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board on how and why the USSR nearly launched a preemptive nuclear strike during the NATO theater nuclear exercise ABLE ARCHER-83, held in November 1983.

Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia is looking forward to a resumption of strong and friendly relations with the U.S. following the recent visit of Saudi Deputy Crown Prince bin Salman with President Trump at the White House.

Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes

President Trump and Republicans in Congress have a once in a generation opportunity to dramatically roll back the frontiers of government but will likely fall short because of their lack of candor and finesse.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. The $7 million deal to save jobs at the Carrier factory in Indianapolis is poised for approval by state officials nearly four months after President Donald Trump celebrated his role in the negotiations with a post-election visit to the plant. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

Steering attention left

Meanwhile, here on Earth, mainstream websites, newspapers, TV and radio trash President Trump incessantly. Consumer confidence gallops? New jobs bulge? The stock market soars? Immaterial. The president is teetering, according to reports that so many Americans follow. Just stroll through a recent day’s snippet at Yahoo and you see not one positive angle. Only these:

Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

Working Together to Stop Nuclear Terror Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The growing threat of nuclear terrorism

The greatest challenge to global security is the nuclear threat from rogue states, led by North Korea and Iran. There will be no progress in ensuring global nuclear stability without cooperation between the United States and Russia. This should be a major priority for Presidents Trump and Putin. Much has been made of states trying to secure their borders against terrorist threats. While it is essential that borders are secured, terrorism is tackled and hatred confronted, we cannot ignore the greatest contemporary threat of all, nuclear attacks. It feels remote and unlikely, but is a very clear and present danger.

Social warriors, sometimes

- The Washington Times

Rape stories, when they can be used to vault social-justice issues into the nation’s psyche, get exhaustive coverage and opining by the mainstream media, regardless of whether they’re even true.

Refugee Comparison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting unrestricted immigration with a false equivalent

President Trump has issued a modified version of his previous immigration policy executive order that was stalled six weeks ago by a federal judge in the state of Washington. Mr. Trump has been under relentless attack from those on the left against his efforts to limit immigration from terrorist-producing areas and his call for comprehensive vetting and background checks. Beyond doubt, it is the first and most important duty of a president to protect the lives of a country’s citizens, especially where a possibility exists of terrorists being embedded within a particular immigration flow. As the president previously stated, to not strictly enforce our immigration laws is “not compassion but recklessness.”

President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of ‘21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of ‘21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state’s voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same “progressives” who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O’Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland’s ‘safe’ environment

A rough translation of Maryland’s state motto is “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words.” In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Related Articles

Trump Claims of Eavesdropping of His Campaign Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tweets and trials

Two of the government's highest ranking intelligence officials will go before a House committee next week to testify about President Trump's bombastic claim that his predecessor "tapped" his phones during the 2016 election.

Brazilian transgender model Valentina Sampaio wears a creation from the Amir Slama collection during Sao Paulo Fashion Week in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

Transgendered child abuse

- The Washington Times

Last year, NBC News did a two-part series dubbed "transgender kids," that featured "the stories of 5-year-old Jacob Lemay and 8-year-old Malisa Phillips, two children transitioning to live as their authentic selves."

Imagining the very human sufferings of a queen

As a person, Queen Anne (1765-1714) is generally accounted the least impressive of the all the female monarchs who have ruled England. Which is not to say that her reign did not see great victories and many consequential events: it's just that she was more a presider over them rather than being as much of an activist as her predecessors or Queen Victoria.

President Donald Trump arrives for a St. Patrick's Day reception in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Mr. Trump's travel ban

President Trump and the lower federal courts are playing a dangerous game of ping-pong, and the nation's security is paying for it. The president, who is responsible for the nation's safety, proposes and certain federal judges, who have no such responsibility dispose. The president proposes again, and again a judge or two dispose.

Sugar tax won't make us healthier

It looks like a food fight in Philadelphia ("When a sugar tax goes sour," Web, March 7). The way to deal with sugar is for the federal government to come clean, and there is no way that is going to happen. Sugar consumption is just the inevitable result of decades of vilifying healthy fats and creating, subsidizing and selling a food supply that is based on three grains plus sugar deep-fried in vegetable oil. And if you ask your doctor about this and how it relates to your health, be prepared for a shock. Your doctor is trained not to have a clue.

Issa Hayatou, right, speaks to FIFA President Gianni Infantino, left, at the opening of the general assembly of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Thursday, March 16, 2017. Issa Hayatou was voted out as president of the African soccer confederation on Thursday after 29 years in charge, losing to challenger Ahmad of Madagascar in a major shakeup for the sport on the continent. (AP Photo)

The hateful idea of hate crime

Three men were indicted this month in Washington for the fatal shooting of a 22-year-old transgendered woman, the robbing of a second transgendered woman and the assault on a third. A "hate crime" charge was added to the charges of conspiracy, robbery and first-degree murder, which could mean that the defendants, if convicted, could serve sentences half again as long as for "mere" murder.

School children, wrapped in blankets, wait nearby their high school in Grasse, southern France, after a 16-year-old student opened fire, wounding two other students and the principal trying to intervene, Thursday, March 16, 2017. French Education Minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem says the shooting in a high school appears to be the "insane act of a fragile young man fascinated by weapons." (AP Photo/Philippe Farjon)

Strong families key to fighting the growing menace of human trafficking

This week I had the great honor to speak at the United Nations on the issue of human trafficking, invited by the Center for Family and Human Rights (C-Fam). The discussion focused on the root causes of trafficking and the key role of the family in preventing this growing and disturbing trend of modern slavery. Human trafficking knows no boundaries and affects the lives of women and children around the globe.

President Donald Trump speaks at a rally Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

What, now Trump's to be taken seriously? How convenient

- The Washington Times

Here's a question that's floating in the winds of judicial clamp-down on President Donald Trump's latest travel ban: Since when did anybody on the left, to include activist judges, consider Trump and his blunt style of speaking anything but clownish in the first place?

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, confers with the committee's ranking member, Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March, 14, 2017, prior to the start of the committee's hearing on the investigation of nude photographs of female Marines and other women that were shared on the Facebook page "Marines United."  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

John McCain's jump the shark moment

- The Washington Times

Sen. John McCain, the Republican from Arizona, apparently facing a brief lull in all the television interviews he's given lately to attack President Donald Trump, took to the Senate floor to deliver a scathing verbal assault on a fellow senator, another Republican, this one, Rand Paul from Kentucky.

Lying Congress and the lying anti-repealers

- The Washington Times

Congress isn't going to repeal Obamacare. That whole Republican-driven mantra that's been making the media wave since 2010 -- the one that blasted Barack Obama as a socialist for signing government health care into law and that vowed a concerted fight for repeal? Bunk. Bull. Boldface lie.

Trump Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seizing a historic opportunity

President Trump presents his first budget to Congress on Thursday. It is, as The Washington Post points out, "historic" because if adopted, it would be the biggest contraction in the federal government since the end of World War II. Predictably, a Post story focuses on the number of federal workers it estimates could lose their jobs, rather than on whether those jobs and the programs associated with them are necessary.

Illustration on an American/Saudi Arabian alliance against Iranian hegemony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The resetting of U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman arrived in Washington this week to meet with President Trump and his team and to reset the U.S.-Saudi relationship, which hit an all-time low during the Obama administration.

Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor at the Capitol in Phoenix Wednesday, March 15, 2017. O'Connor, who served in the Arizona state Senate as a member and majority leader from 1969 until she because a state court judge in 1973, was honored for her work promoting civics education. (AP Photo/Bob Christie)

Madison's principles on trial

James Madison, the author of the Bill of Rights, once said that "[g]overnment is instituted to protect property of every sort. This being the end of government, that alone is a just government which impartially secures to every man whatever is his own."