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Illustration on accurately identifying Islamist terror by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Freedom, security — and the truth

With blizzards, deflated footballs and green-lipsticked YouTube personalities dominating recent news, it was easy to miss two hugely important truth-telling moments. If only they had received the same coverage as air pressure in NFL regulation footballs.

A New York City snowplow, loaded with salt, sits parked in midtown Manhattan as light snow falls, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Northeast residents are girding for a heavy snowstorm that could bury communities from northern New Jersey to southern Maine in up to 2 feet of snow. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Another snow job

Today, politicians and their ideological fellow travelers in the media use the normal cycles of the seasons to promote “climate change.”

Illustration on the failed policy of enemy combatant internment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The al-Marri enigma

Ali Saleh al-Marri is a convicted conspirator who entered the United States before Sept. 11, 2001, in order to create a dreaded sleeper cell here that might someday launch an attack on Americans similar to what we witnessed earlier this month in Paris. When the feds woke from their slumber on Sept. 11, they wisely began to search immigration records for persons who came here with no discernible purpose from places known to spawn terrorist groups and who had overstayed their visas. Al-Marri was one such person.

Illustration on heroism replaced by narcissism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Heroes in the age of the selfie

Heroes, real ones, are getting harder to find. One of the few remaining annual surprises in the typical State of the Union address is the president’s introduction of his “mystery guest.” President Reagan introduced the first one in 1982, celebrating one Leonard Skutnik for an extraordinary act of courage.

Conservatism has blossomed into the major intellectual and political force of our time. (Rod Lamkey Jr/ The Washington Times)

Conservatism is now everywhere

There is a problem with the Internet. Its commentary is too often dominated by pinheads. H.L. Mencken used to complain that only idiots write letters to the editor. That might have been true of his day — the 1920s and 1930s — but in our time writers of letters to the editor of newspapers and even of websites are occasionally quite well-informed and even lucid. But others, I am afraid, are indeed pinheads, sitting in their underwear back home, foaming at the mouth, believing that the whole world is profoundly interested in their every word, until the authorities arrive at their homes to take them away.

Illustration on threatened government meddling in the private sector world of sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Jumping offsides on ‘Deflategate’

Super Bowl XLIX (49) will be played this Sunday. Sadly, the anticipated matchup between the AFC champion New England Patriots and NFC champion Seattle Seahawks has already had the wind knocked out of its sails — or, in this case, the air out of its footballs.

The Democratic assault on free speech

- The Washington Times

Everybody’s for free speech — until somebody says something he doesn’t like. But the genius of the First Amendment is that it is so direct and plain that even a lawyer or a judge can understand it.

Illustration on the Obama administrations role in Iranian nuclear ambitions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s price for Obama’s coveted legacy

The importance of any political event is best measured against its opponents’ reactions. By that yardstick, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s agreement to speak about the dangers of Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons before a joint session of Congress is already enormously significant.

Illustration on American's diminished economic freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Regaining lost economic freedom

If you were to rank all the countries of the world based on their level of economic freedom, you’d think the United States would be a shoo-in for first place, right? Surely we would be at least somewhere in the top five.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

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Illustration on the spiritual costs of submission to evil by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The silencing of the soul

The massacre in Paris by Muslim militants at the Charlie Hebdo magazine office was about much more than freedom of speech. After all, militants also killed four hostages at a Jewish market, and that was not about freedom to buy kosher food.

U.S. must step up

As France changes its foreign policy and sends an aircraft carrier to help fight the Islamic State following the Paris terrorist attacks, American leadership is still needed to coordinate and unite 40 nations ("Key U.S. military command's Twitter, YouTube sites back online," Web, Jan. 13). Russia is building up forces facing Poland and the Baltic states and is fortifying Kaliningrad. The Islamic State and al Qaeda are planning more attacks. China continues to dominate and threaten its neighbors. Now more than ever effective leadership is needed to deal with increasing Russian aggression, the increasing radical Islamic threat and continued Chinese expansion.

Saudi Arabia funds terror

The time has come to identify the primary instigators of terrorism as being Sunni Muslims. What do the perpetrators of the USS Cole attack, the two attacks on the World Trade Center, the recent attacks in Canada, Australia and France, Osama bin Laden, Anwar al-Awlaki, the Islamic State and al Qaeda all have in common? They are all tied to Sunni terrorism, sponsored philosophically and financially by Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar.

Pope Francis     Associated Press photo

Pope Francis, neither a Marxist nor an economist

Last week Pope Francis defended himself against the charges of Marxism, explaining that caring for the poor is at the heart of Christian teaching. The pope is right. Caring about the poor does not make one a Marxist. By the same logic, defense of the free market does not make one oblivious to the plight of the less fortunate.

Micheal Mpubane leads a Bible study at the Progressive Primary in Johannesburg. Poor South Africans are underserved by a government that has struggled to close the gap apartheid created between white and black public schools. (Associated Press)

Learning in unexpected places

"Education for all" was set as a worldwide priority by the United Nations in 1990, to be accomplished in 25 years. The deadline is upon us and billions of dollars later, UNESCO, the cultural arm of the U.N., says there are still 175 million children in the developing world who can't read or write. This is taken as proof at the U.N. that governments must "intensify their efforts," meaning they must "intensify" the spending of more money. The facts tell a different story.

Illustration on the exorbitant costs of maintaining detainees at Guantanamo Bay by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The reasons why Guantanamo is so expensive

In listening to President Obama and most Democrats in Congress, one might think that holding detainees at Guantanamo Bay is what's bankrupting America.

FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2015 file photo, gas prices were under two dollars a gallon are seen at a service station in Leonia, N.J. A 50-percent plunge in the price of crude oil, and cheaper gas at the pump, raise critical questions about whether the Keystone XL oil pipeline is still needed or even makes financial sense. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Just say no to a gas tax hike

Echoing Nancy Pelosi in calling for a gas tax increase is not the way to brand the new GOP Congress.

The New Hampshire Rebellion - a nonpartisan grassroots group -  wants politicians to know their state is 'not for sale." (Image from New Hampshire Rebellion)

Cold fury: 'New Hampshire Rebellion' walks 250 frozen miles to protest big money in politics

- The Washington Times

The New Hampshire Rebellion, a nonpartisan grass-roots group that has declared that the Granite State is "no longer for sale" to presidential candidates, has made good on its promise to walk over 250 miles from the four corners of the state, to eventually converge on the State House in Concord for a big rally by Wednesday. Despite freezing temperatures and challenging weather, the intrepid group is receiving a warm welcome, apparently.

GOP accused of omitting Univision from 2016 debates to 'avoid uncomfortable immigration questions'

- The Washington Times

It only took a few hours for the squabbles to break out following the Republican National Committee's announcement revealing the time, place and network for the Party's nine official Republican presidential debates. Critics complained that such networks as Univision and MSNBC had been frozen out of the line-up, which is a lot skinnier than it was in 2012, when 20 debates crowded the schedule.

FILE - In this July 1, 2013, file photo,  smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont. State officials planned a public meeting Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, in Colstrip on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposal to cut greenhouse emissions. The town is home to one of the largest coal-fired power plants in the West,  a 2,100-megawatt facility that churns out more greenhouse gases than any other source in Montana. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

The energy deniers

Our "Energy Deniers" pander to the environmental fringe and dream of endless tax revenues that we will all pay for.

In this Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014 file photo, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg gestures while speaking during a media conference prior to a meeting of the North Atlantic Council at NATO headquarters in Brussels. Leaving combat operations in Afghanistan behind, NATO is shifting its focus to Europe in 2015 and the creation of its new ultra-rapid reaction force, designed as a deterrent to Russia.  (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)

NATO'S new capabilities

It's time for other NATO members to start kicking in more to help pay for their own defense.

Missouri Department of Agriculture should handle deer farms

As recently reported in The Washington Times, new legislative bills moving farmed deer under the oversight of the Department of Agriculture will be heard again this session following the controversy of last session's debates in Jefferson City, Mo. ("Missouri bill to switch oversight of deer farms returns," Web, Jan. 6). The bill is still needed because the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), which oversees deer farms, is pushing regulations that are designed to put the farms out of business.

'Satellite solidarity' with sorely lacking

White House press secretary Josh Earnest has done his best to deal with the decision by someone in the White House that President Obama not go to Paris. Mr. Earnest has pointed out the president's unwavering support for France and the French people. Obama called French President Francois Hollande on the day of the Charlie Hebdo attacks to express his outrage. He offered all U.S. assistance in dealing with the situation. He even dropped by the French embassy to sign the condolence book.

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington in this Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, file photo. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Is the FCC unlawful?

Last year saw the publication of Philip Hamburger's new book, "Is Administrative Law Unlawful?" In his magisterial work, Mr. Hamburger claims — backed up by extensive research into English and American constitutional history — that most of the regulatory actions of our federal administrative agencies are unlawful.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press)

Why Hillary Clinton won't run for president

Hillary can't win, and that's why she won't run. She may not know that yet herself, but a lot of Democrats want her because she's all they've got. The Republicans are counting on her to run because they think she's the candidate they can beat in what looks from here like it could be a Republican year.

Illustration on dealing with sexual assaults in the military by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Exploiting sexual assault in the military

The new Senate will have many national security and defense issues to deal with in 2015, but indulging Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand's relentless campaign to alter the military justice system should not be one of them.