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Illustration of Ajit Pai by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A new champion for internet choice

One of President Trump’s less publicized appointments also happens to be one of his best: Ajit Pai as the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is a cause for celebration.

Illustration on the 9th Circuit court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reining in a hysterical judiciary

On Feb. 9, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit issued a ruling upholding the temporary restraining order against enforcement of President Trump’s Executive Order 13769.

Illustration on the complexities of dealing with illegal immigration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The labyrinth of illegal immigration

Activists portray illegal immigration solely as a human story of the desperately poor from south of the border fleeing misery to start new, productive lives in the United States — despite exploitation and America’s nativist immigration laws.

Black Leadership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Enlightened, inspired black leadership

After having been assigned to the United States Military Academy at West Point, one becomes acutely aware of the critical role leadership plays in solving challenging social problems. As an African-American, with that experience, I cannot not but consider the role black leadership plays in addressing African-American issues.

Illustration on domestic spying by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The spooks have come home to roost

Last week, The Wall Street Journal revealed that members of the intelligence community — part of the deep state, the unseen government within the government that does not change with elections — now have acquired so much data on everyone in America that they can selectively reveal it to reward their friends and harm their foes. Their principal foe today is the president of the United States.

The Annual Academy Liberal Awards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How not to embarrass Oscar

When you give your acceptance speeches, thank your publicist, limo driver, manicurist, masseuse, day nanny, night nanny and weekend nanny. Your attorney Marty Singer for killing that salacious National Enquirer story.

Illustration on the need to clean house at U.S. intelligence agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rousting the anti-Flynn cabal

In the anti-Trump media war, it is nearly impossible to keep the names straight without a scorecard. Barely had Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn’s name faded from the news cycle than he was replaced by H.R. McMaster, another lieutenant general most Americans have never heard of. Will this latest general be any more fortunate than his predecessor? Only if he can overcome the frenzied machinations of the Obama deep state.

President Donald Trump, right, speaks as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, listens at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The downside of a Trump tariff

When word got out in January 1848 that gold had been discovered at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California, near Sacramento, it triggered the famous California Gold Rush, which in a few short years brought some 300,000 fortune seekers to the territory, whose population at the time was just 155,000, most of them Native Americans.

Attack on the Earth by the Evil Empire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Time’s misreading of science

As demonstrated by the confirmation hearings of Scott Pruitt for new Environmental Protection Agency chief, all-out war is being waged against the Trump administration by leftists who believe science is under attack from the evil empire.

President Donald Trump walks with Housing and Urban Development Secretary-designate Dr. Ben Carson, as they pass a exhibit honoring Carson during a tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Trump-Reagan parallels

The media laugh at any attempt to compare President Trump with former President Ronald Reagan, but there are many similarities, not the least of which are the withering attacks both men endured while running for and as president.

Milo Yiannopoulos      Associated Press photo

An expensive lesson for conservatives

- The Washington Times

The more the culture bounds out of control, the more the wary have to take care with the company they keep. This applies to media that will print anything in pursuit of “clicks” and “hits,” and to well-meaning organizations about whom they invite to tutor their true believers.

No deal for a two-state solution

“The president is committed to peace. That’s as far as I want to go on that,” said President Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer, on Feb. 3 in answer to a reporter’s inquiry regarding the Trump administration’s position on the “two-state solution” for peace between the Palestinians and Israelis. Will Mr. Trump push the two-state paradigm, like George W. Bush and Barack Obama before him, or will the White House realize that this idea is a dangerous fantasy like the irrational Iran nuclear deal?

Retirement Planning Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing for the long term

Ordinary investors can’t be blamed for hesitancy about stocks with market indexes trading near record levels and President Trump’s radical, sometimes quixotic ideas creating so much uncertainty. Yet patience and a diversified portfolio remain the best long-term investment strategy.

FILE - This 2015 file photo provided by the Bloomington Normal Airport Authority shows a damaged wing of a Cirrus SR22 single-engine plane at the Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. Once seen as a luxury of the corporate world, private planes are becoming increasingly common at U.S. colleges and universities as schools try to attract athletes, raise money and reward coaches with jet-set vacations. Iowa State University President Steven Leath, a pilot, acknowledged last year that he used a school plane for trips that mixed personal and university business, a practice that came to light after he damaged the aircraft in a hard landing. (Bloomington Normal Airport Authority via AP, File)

TripAdvisor’s Stockholm Syndrome

Despite producing huge amounts of value for society, businesses are among the most vilified institutions in America.

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR: NFL talent still getting snubbed

I was disappointed that longtime Washington Redskins tackle Joe Jacoby was again overlooked by the Pro Football Hall of Fame ("Redskins great Joe Jacoby does not make Hall of Fame," Web, Feb. 4). The legendary "Hog," a four-time Pro Bowler (1983-1986) and three-time Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII, XXVI), deserves the honor.

Repeal costly Obamacare now

For eight long years we Americans have waited for Obamacare to be repealed. Republicans have used the promise of repeal to get reelected. It appears this was a false promise, a betrayal.

President Donald Trump salutes back to a Marines honor guard member as he disembarks Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

No sanctuary for the money

Some of our big-city mayors are having a high old time on a play date, with demonstrations of piety and righteous indignation in a game of "you show me yours and I'll show you mine." They get to needle President Trump from a distance for his attempt to impose order on the rush of illegal immigrants into the United States.

President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Mischief by the 9th Circuit

President Trump suggested strongly at the end of a tumultuous week that he might not appeal the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding the trashing of his executive order limiting the admission of refugees from seven chaotic and terror-prone nations of the Middle East.

Asian Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dealing with North Korea

Since Kim Jong-un took over from his father in December 2011 as the supreme leader, the nuclear threat from North Korea has increased exponentially. Over this five-year period, North Korea has conducted four progressively larger nuclear tests and more than 50 ballistic missile launches. In 2016 alone, North Korea conducted two nuclear tests and 25 missile launches, to include a June 2016 successful test of its Musudan Intermediate Range Ballistic missile, with a range of 4000 kilometers, and an August 2016 successful submarine-launched ballistic missile, with a range of 1000 kilometers.

Monica Crowley     Associated Press photo

Rising to Monica Crowley's defense

When CNN and Politico charged last month that Monica Crowley -- my longtime friend and editor at The Washington Times -- was a serial plagiarist, the sickening headlines left me angry. And more than slightly confused.

Revisiting the Romanovs' revolutionary capital

British historian Helen Rappaport, who has written memorably about Russia's royal Romanovs, here turns her attention to their capital city during the year when it ceased to be theirs.

Illustration on antiterrorist measures in France by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The ACLU's war on common sense

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is leading the charge against President Trump's order to temporarily halt immigrants from seven Middle Eastern countries identified by the Obama administration as hotbeds of terrorism.

Illustration on the financial inequities of class action lawsuits by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Protecting consumers from swindlers

Trump administration spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway recently defended false statements about inauguration crowd size as "alternative facts," provoking a great kerfuffle. But in the class-action world, trial lawyers have been making millions on alternative facts for decades. And, astonishingly, courts disagree over whether it's permissible for lawyers to use alternative facts to cheat their consumer clients.

Illustration on the Baker/Schultz carbon tax plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The carbon tax scam

I have nothing but respect for former Secretaries of State Jim Baker and George Schultz, but come on gentlemen: you've been snookered.

Washington faced longer odds

In terms of historical contrast, the division and opposition Donald Trump faces as president hardly measure up to the challenges George Washington faced during and even after the War of Independence. The issue of independence from Britain was by no means unanimously supported, and it proved highly divisive in all 13 of the original states. Indeed, 80,000 loyalists who rejected independence left the fledgling country during or after the war. Patriot communities went about forcing people on pain of punishment and confiscation of property to swear allegiance to the United States.

Left, not Trump supporters, violent

Over the past year the media has incessantly promoted the idea that conservatives (and more specifically "Trump supporters") have been inciting violence and hate across the country. The truth is precisely the opposite. Examining the violent crimes that have taken place in the past year reveals that the Democratic Party is responsible for inciting the violence, and that this pattern of oppression through violence is repeated throughout history as far back as the Civil War.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, center, holds a meeting with the heads of federal law enforcement components at the Department of Justice in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. FBI Director James Comey sits at left and Acting Deputy Attorney General Dana Boente is at right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool)

The rant that failed

The Democrats in the U.S. Senate threw everything they could find at Jeff Sessions, including an occasional kitchen sink, but it was not enough. Rant as they might, the mild-mannered senator from Alabama, was nevertheless confirmed by a vote of 52 to 47. One Democrat, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, broke from the mob to vote to confirm him.

In this Feb. 1, 2017 photo, Anjali Lama, a transgender model from Nepal, holds a scarf up with another model as they wait to walk the ramp during Lakme Fashion week in Mumbai, India. Growing up as the fifth son in a poor farming family in rural Nepal the dream to be a fashion model came late in life. First came a long, painful struggle to accept that he felt deeply female. It was a chance encounter with a group of transgender women that turned Lama's life around by putting her in touch with the Blue Diamond Society, an advocacy group for Nepal's LGBT community. In 2005 she came out to her friends and family as a transgender woman. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

Aborted bliss in the boudoir

The lot of a transgendered wife is not always a happy one, no matter how many genders and marriages she terminates with extreme prejudice. A cheatin' heart can hurt in the unlikeliest places.

Illustration on the results of Congressional overcomplexity on tax reform by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Changing the tax code

When it comes to changing our tax code, Washington should trust the free-enterprise system. The problem is too many politicians writing tax policy have never worked in the real world.