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Illustration on North Korea strategies by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

Engaging with a belligerent North Korea

At a time when the leader of North Korea is widely accused of ordering the murder of his half-brother, it is understandable that some in the Trump administration might want to keep their distance. But the decision announced a few days ago to cancel planned unofficial Track 1.5 talks in New York with the Pyongyang regime was a mistake. As someone who has participated in both formal Six Party negotiations and Track 1.5 talks, I can attest to the value of candid discussions with North Korea.

Broken NATO Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s NATO shake-up

Western political and media elites reacted with horror to President Trump’s repeated statements that NATO is “obsolete” during the 2016 electoral campaign. They have also reacted with skepticism to more recent efforts by senior administration officials to affirm the U.S. commitment to NATO while pressing America’s allies to do more for their own defense.

Oscar Al Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The trouble with Oscar

It was the greatest Oscar moment since they gave the golden statue to Al Gore, the Greatest Ham of All Time. (Idle thought: Should they change the name of the cold-cut company to “Gore’s Head?”) The irony of that wondrous occasion had been made even more delicious by the title of his mock-u-mentary: “An Inconvenient Truth.” But Sunday night’s epic snafu topped even that, the botched Best Picture Award quickly blamed on an accounting firm that had somehow misunderstood the import of “May I have the envelope please?”

"La La Land" producer Jordan Horowitz, left, presenter Warren Beatty, center, and host Jimmy Kimmel right, look at an envelope announcing "Moonlight" as best picture at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. It was originally announced mistakenly that "La La Land" was the winner. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

Why the liberal establishment is collapsing

I didn’t watch the Academy Awards, but I sure enjoyed them — via Twitter. The collection of world-famous and super-rich liberals and leftists had one job, and they failed. The spectacular screwup of announcing the wrong winner for Best Picture wasn’t even the issue, or about one person making a mistake. Mistakes are made all the time.

President Trump (Associated Press)

No hot date for the Nerd Prom

- The Washington Times

Guess who’s not coming to dinner, and probably a good thing, too. Neither Donald Trump nor the not so loyal opposition can be trusted to sup together without sharp elbows, sneers and insults. Before the second bottle of wine is uncorked, the hard rolls (and most years the rolls are really hard) would be flying across the tables.

Illustration on President Trump's "disruptive" approach to governance by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Rebooting the new Trump presidency

President Trump is off to the rockiest start of any modern president. He faces remarkably well-organized opposition from liberal activists, who refuse to accept the outcome of the election, but his biggest problems are bad management, staffing and questionable strategic decisions at the White House.

Illustration on funding the border wall with seized illegal cash by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ready billions for the wall

Sometimes the obvious just needs to be said. Official Washington is bellyaching about the cost of President Trump’s “wall,” intended to protect the Southwest border. Some put the cost at more than $20 billion. So be it. Beyond contraband and illegal immigrants coming north, something goes south: cash. Simply put, these illicit proceeds, counted in the tens of billions, would easily pay for the wall — time to say so.

Illustration of Qassem Suleymani by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Crimes of Qassem

He might not be a household name in America — at least, not yet. But throughout the Middle East, Qassem Suleymani makes the righteous and the innocent tremble.

A New Jersey State Police cruiser leaves Trump National Golf Club, Friday, Nov. 18, 2016, in Bedminster, N.J. President-elect Donald Trump is expected to arrive at the golf club on Friday. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Criminal civil forfeiture

Living in a free society brings benefits, but also responsibilities. One of the most important is keeping an eye on government. You never know when lawmakers will try to do something bad — or something that seems good initially, then goes spectacularly wrong.

Illustration on Taiwan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China, Taiwan and an important anniversary

This year Beijing will stand in solidarity with Taiwan and commemorate the 70th anniversary of the “228 Massacre.” On Feb. 28, 1947 Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang (KMT) security forces stopped Lin Jiang-mai, a Taiwanese widow, for illegal cigarette sales. The KMT officers confiscated Mrs. Lin’s cash and wares. They struck her on the head repeatedly for resisting.

Healthcare Industry Dependence on Obamacare Finances Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When hospitals resist change

Most Republican health care proposals include Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). People like them because they reward healthy lifestyle choices and careful, cost-conscious use of health care resources. When we are advised we need to get a MRI, we ask “when?” and “where?” but hardly ever, “what does it cost?”

Chart to acompany Moore article of Feb. 27, 2017

Pleading poverty, demanding new taxes

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. Governors and state legislators are pleading poverty again and they are demanding tax hikes of every imaginable kind. More than half the states are facing big deficits this year and they are mostly blue states like California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois and New York and Oregon. (See chart.) These are the highest tax states with some of the deepest pools of red ink. There’s got to be a message here.

Illustration on trump's international policy attitude by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Trump Doctrine

The United States needs a grand strategy to guide its foreign policy. The Trump Doctrine should announce boldly that America is back in the world leadership business and that it stands resolutely for peace. America should call out countries that threaten world peace and form military alliances with their neighbors to confront them.

Related Articles

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council -- an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies -- President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America's anti-growth tax system.

Focus on jobs, not feelings

During his campaign, President Trump talked a lot about infrastructure. He was going to build new schools, new roads, new bridges, etc. He was going to put 100,000 people to work, and that was just for starters. So far, all I've heard for three weeks is 'Everyone is picking on me.' Mr. Trump doesn't like what this person said; he doesn't like what that person said. He is constantly sending out angry tweets.

Media did due diligence on nominees

Now that Michael Flynn has been forced out as national security adviser, Andrew Puzder has had to withdraw his name from nomination for labor secretary and Betsy DeVos was so unpopular as to have needed the vice president to break a tie vote on her confirmation as education secretary, one wonders whether the Trump administration will learn anything from these debacles.

About 50 fast food workers protest the nomination of former Hardees CEO Andrew Puzder to lead the U.S. Department of Labor on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, outside the current headquarters of the fast food chain in downtown St. Louis. Fast food workers claim Puzder is unfit for the position because of his policies toward employees as Hardees boss. (Christian Gooden/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

Trump's missing free market warriors

Andy Puzder's withdrawal for consideration as Donald Trump's secretary of Labor might have been premature but for the easy surrender of the Republicans in the Senate to a left-wing slander campaign. Mr. Puzder's replacement, R. Alexander Acosta, is a labor lawyer without any real-life experience in hiring workers, but he looks confirmable. However, this leaves the new administration with almost no sound voices for free-market ideas.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California's mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump's presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration's top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

Murder, a memory problem and justice

Commander William Monk has been haunted for many years by loss of memory suffered in an accident and that disaster has turned into a nightmare in which he finds himself facing charges of murder and a possible death sentence.

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump's meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

Evan McMullin

#NeverTrumpers fight back, with the help of the deep state

The #NeverTrumpers are at it again, cheering on the "deep state" in the bureaucracy and politicized members in the intelligence community as they try to undermine and delegitimize President Trump. Their actions are disturbing, destructive and — as the president himself correctly tweeted — deeply "un-American."

President Donald Trump during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump is the answer to all that ails Washington

- The Washington Times

In a whirling dervish White House press conference, President Trump manhandled the press, piledrived all the fake news and reminded the world why he tore through both political parties and got elected president in the first place.

President Planned Parenthood Federation of America Cecile Richards speak to the crowd during the women's march rally, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) ** FILE **

Planned Parenthood's nonpartisan joke

- The Washington Times

"I mean because Planned Parenthood, we're nonpartisan," Cecile Richards, the organization's president, told Mika Brzezinski on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" earlier this month about her willingness to work with the Trump administration. "We believe the most important thing is that women in this country get access to the health care that they need."

Needed: Fearless leaders

The Republican Party is beset by leaders who fear the press. Former House Speaker John Boehner displayed enormous trepidation when speaking to media members, and current Speaker Paul Ryan shows the same weakness. For the past four years Ryan has encouraged his members to vote with the Democrats. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell doesn't even possess confidence in conservatism, much less confidence in espousing it, in public.

Grow Republican base organically

The GOP, under President Trump and Vice President Pence, has the ability to rewrite many new U.S. strategy playbooks. The primary Republican strategy must be to expand and broaden the party's successes and capitalize on the Trump-delivered majorities.