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Ghost Town Soldier Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s sentinels have gone home

Josef Stalin, when asked in 1935 whether he could do anything with Russian Catholics to help win favor with the pope against the increasing Nazi threat, famously responded: “How many divisions has he got?”

Illegal Aliens and Illegal Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama has forgotten his official duty is to Americans

Like millions of other Americans, I appreciate the plight of billions of people throughout the world who would like nothing more than to find themselves in the United States, where they could enjoy a much higher standard of living and wonderful opportunities for advancement. It should first be considered, however, that we have millions of people already mired in dire poverty.

Illustration on Middle East violence by Julius/Horsens Folkeblad, Horsens, Denmark

Slaughter in the synagogue

Executioners for the Islamic State use knives to cut the throats of Christians, Yazidis and “apostate” Muslims. Palestinian executioners last week used knives and a meat cleaver to slaughter Jewish worshippers at a synagogue in West Jerusalem.

Illustration on the removal of Chuck Hagel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dumping Hagel at Defense

The abrupt resignation of Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has a few important facts behind it, but it is probably tied to a shift in President Obama’s strategy in Afghanistan.

President Barack Obama, left, reaches over to touch Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, left, following an announcement of Hagel's resignation during an event in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Hagel is stepping down under pressure from Obama's Cabinet, senior administration officials said Monday, following a tenure in which he has struggled to break through the White House's insular foreign policy team. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

What Hagel’s exit means

Chuck Hagel’s decision signified only one thing: Barack Obama no longer enjoys the confidence of the American military establishment.

Congress Wields the Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring regular order on Capitol Hill

So long as they do not overplay their hand, Republicans in the U.S. House and Senate have been given a wonderful opportunity to significantly pare the federal budget and shape U.S. policy in the last two years of the Obama administration.

Illustration on the effects of Obama's illegal alien order on the African American population by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How about putting Americans first?

The framers of the Constitution sought to limit the power of government and expand individual liberty. President Obama sees it the other way. Whether he violated the constitutional limits of his power will be debated and possibly decided in the courts and by the new Republican majority in Congress, but there is another issue surrounding the amnesty order that needs addressing.

Illustration on further Union intrusion on McDonald's and other franchises by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Going overboard at the labor board

Whom do you work for? Such a simple question should not require a government agency to give an answer. However, the Obama administration, in its never-ending quest for power over individuals and businesses, has decided that it — rather than you or your employer — should determine whom you work for.

Related Articles

Barry Goldwater waves to delegates inside the Cow Palace at the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco. As a senator, he strongly argued that it is a core American value and in the country's best interest to stand by Taiwan as it faced an existential threat from tyrannical communists. Goldwater's contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific. He championed the passage of the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA), a landmark piece of legislation, which through bipartisan support, was signed into law in April 1979. To this day, that law provides the bedrock for U.S.-Taiwan relations. (Associated Press)

Goldwater: Unwavering friend of 'Free China'

Barry Goldwater is rightfully an icon of the American conservative movement for decades since the 1960s, and it is a privilege and an honor to contribute to his remembrance on the 50th anniversary of his presidential campaign. What many Americans may not know, however, is the role then-Sen. Goldwater played in the U.S. relations with my country, the Republic of China (ROC, Taiwan), usually termed by the senator as "Free China." His contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific as well.

Sen. Barry Goldwater, Arizona Republican, announces his candidacy for the U.S. presidency in Phoenix on Jan. 3, 1964.

The man who ignited a revolution

Who was Barry Goldwater, universally known as "Mr. Conservative," and how did his '64 presidential campaign ignite a conservative revolution?

BOOK REVIEW: 'Rebel Yell'

For two years, 1861 to 1863, Gen. Thomas Jonathan ("Stonewall") Jackson, West Point graduate, hero of the Mexican war, and in the interim a quirky eccentric former Virginia Military Institute professor plagued by a host of 19th-century afflictions, became not just a hero of the Confederacy, but a brilliant military tactician who out-thought, out-anticipated, outmaneuvered and outfought the enemy.

Citizens hold signs at the Westminster Board of Health meeting on the proposed tobacco ban, at the Westminster Elementary School, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, in Westminster, Ma. A public meeting on a central Massachusetts town's proposed first-in-the-nation ban on tobacco and nicotine sales ended early Wednesday because officials say the crowd was getting too unruly to continue. (AP Photo/Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Steve Lanava)

EDITORIAL: Anti-smoking fanaticism

Prohibition is back in Westminster, a rural town of about 8,000 near the New Hampshire border in north-central Massachusetts. The town's three-member board of health said it would prohibit the sale of all tobacco products within the town's borders.

President Ronald Reagan, right, greets Sen. Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz., in the Rose Garden at the White House during a ceremony to start National Partiotism Week in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Feb. 17, 1981.  (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)

'You and I have a rendezvous with destiny'

Excerpts from the speech delivered by Ronald Reagan on Oct. 27, 1964, in support of Barry Goldwater's candidacy for president. It affectionately has become known as "The Speech" and is widely credited for catapulting Mr. Reagan and his vision for conservatism onto the national stage.

Illustration on the continuing burdens of Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Grubered, gruberish, Grubergate? The new gruberisms multiply

- The Washington Times

Grubergate, gruberish, grubered, grubermania, moneygrubering and gruberpalooza are among the new terms that have sprung into public use, these inspired by one particular economist who made an unfortunate comment about Obamcare, transparency and the mental capacity of Americans recently. But such things spawn instant culture. All the new nouns and verbs - some capitalized, some not - are now appearing in multiple print and online reports from Time, Bloomberg, Fox News, Powerline, Lucianne.com and many other sources. What with Twitter hashtags and jaunty dialogue, the usage has been spirited in recent days.

Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker gives a thumbs up as he speaks at his campaign party Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, in West Allis, Wis. Walker defeated Democratic gubernatorial challenger Mary Burke. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)

Not much of a sizzler, but still a victor: Scott Walker becomes viable 2016 contender

- The Washington Times

"Does Walker sizzle? Not exactly. Is he a particularly charismatic speaker? No, he isn't. But does he sit upon a throne made of the skulls of his enemies? Yes, yes he does. The November 4 election proved that in a definitive fashion. And though we are a constitutional republic not given to men upon thrones, this particular throne deserves consideration for a national position," observes Federalist writer Rich Cromwell observes.

Gov. Jerry Brown discusses his re-election while taking with reporters at his Capitol office in Sacramento, Calif., Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

EDITORIAL: Tarnish on the Golden State

Jerry Brown is stepping up for an unprecedented fourth term as governor of California, but nobody would call his economic performance particularly distinguished. The Cato Institute ranks him as the nation's most fiscally inept governor on its Governors Report Card for 2014.

DC Abortion Law from Hell Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

D.C.'s hopelessly illegal abortion mandate

The D.C. Council could vote as early as Tuesday to force pro-life employers within the District to pay for their employees' elective surgical abortions.

U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping drink a toast at a lunch banquet in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Obama is on a state visit after attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit. (AP Photo/Greg Baker, Pool)

Climate change self-delusion

That sound you're hearing from across the Pacific is the Chinese rulers and Beijing laughing at us.

Illustration on equality and tolerance as an excuse for anti-religious tyranny by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A brave new world of intolerance

After decades of chipping away at America's Christian heritage, the liberal enforcers of "equality" and "tolerance" are more open about the brave new future they envision: It's their way or nobody's way.