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Illustration on the realities of gender difference by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sex, gender, confusion and distraction

Sex and gender are serious subjects, but academics, pundits and the pop media have so stretched their meanings to use as weapons of political persuasion that the words sometimes don’t mean very much. Communication becomes confusion and distraction.

The Capitol is illuminated by the rising sun in Washington, Wednesday, March 29, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The congressmen and the counselor

Tony Hall served in Congress for 24 years, representing Ohio’s 3rd District. The Democrat left in 2002 to serve as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture, appointed by President George W. Bush.

Trashing the Filibuster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redeeming the filibuster

The Senate filibuster should be placed on the Endangered Species List. It is indeed endangered, and when it goes, an important element of our governmental system will go with it. Gone will be the Senate’s role as the country’s most deliberative governmental entity, where consensus reigns and the passions of the moment are subdued by calm, measured consideration of all angles and facets of any issue. It also is where vital checks can be placed on any abuse of the minority by the majority.

Cyber Warfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Warfare goes digital in the 21st century

Russia’s intelligence service hacks Democratic Party computer networks and puts out stolen emails in a bid to influence the 2016 election. China says it owns 90 percent of the South China Sea and begins building military bases under a vague historical claim to the strategic waterway. Iranian hackers break into American banks and a water control computer network at an upstate New York dam. Welcome to the new form of conflict in the 21st century: information warfare.

Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at the 2017 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference held at the Verizon Center in Washington, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Nikki Haley’s full-bird flip to the U.N.

- The Washington Times

Oh, Nikki Haley. What a gem you’ve become. The South Carolina flag-flap is forgiven — so, too, the endorsement of Marco Rubio for president. Kicking it hard to the United Nations has lit up her political star once again.

In this Sept. 27, 2009 photo, skulls and bones from some of the estimated 10,000 Tutsis killed in a two-day massacre at Nyamata church during the 1994 genocide, are displayed in a crypt behind the church, now a memorial to the genocide, in the town of Nyamata, Rwanda.           Associated Press photo

Why Trump’s first overseas trip should include Africa

As the first African president to address Washington’s largest annual gathering of pro-Israel activists, Rwandan leader Paul Kagame underscored a key reason for his country’s natural kinship with the Jewish state: As two peoples who survived brutal extermination campaigns, they know the real-world consequences of inaction in the face of hate.

Illustration on the ideology behind Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A bloody day in London town

“The Kafir’s Blood Is Halal For You, So Shed it.” That’s just one of the catchier headlines in a recent issue of Rumiyah, a slick online magazine published by the Islamic State, also known as ISIS and ISIL.

Podesta Russian Ties Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ dalliance with hypocrisy

- The Washington Times

Washington and the national media are all about double standards. It should come as no surprise to anyone that the sort of Russian “ties” used to condemn Republicans as possible agents of Moscow are dismissed as irrelevant when Democrats are revealed to have deeper, stronger and far more remunerative connections to Russian banks, oligarchs and institutions than any Republican currently being banished to the outer darkness by Democratic “progressives.”

Illustration on Liberal attitudes toward the Judiciary branch by Alexandewr Hunter/The Washington Times

Higher than the high court

The trials of Judge Neil M. Gorsuch, before the Senate Judiciary Committee en route almost certainly to his place on the Supreme Court, reveal one of my favorite findings regarding modern politics, to wit: The Democrats are the extremists, the Republicans are mainstream. The Democrats are the ideologues; the Republicans base their policies and political judgments usually on philosophy.

In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. United said on Monday, March 27, 2017, that regular-paying fliers are welcome to wear leggings aboard its flights, even though two teenage girls were barred by a gate agent from boarding a flight from Denver to Minneapolis Sunday because of their attire. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

The left and leggings

Two girls needing to change out of their leggings in order to board a United Airlines flight caused quite the kerfuffle on social media, after a “bystander” named Shannon Watts went into a tweetstorm of clueless, self-righteous indignation. In other words, she was a professional liberal activist, something else the legacy media has chosen to not mention.

Illustration on the dangers of "dawa," Islamist indoctrination by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Confronting political Islam

It is important for the United States to tackle radical Islamist ideological indoctrination — dawa — before it takes root to the extent it has in Europe.

Davey Crockett Donation to Fire Victims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The false compassion of liberalism

Last week on CNN I debated a liberal commentator who complained that the problem with the Trump budget blueprint is that it lacks “compassion” for the poor, children and the disabled. This woman went on to ask me how I could defend a budget that would cut Meals on Wheels, after-school programs, and special-ed funding, because without the federal dollars, these vital services would go away.

Illustration on the negatives of the Paris climate accords by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward a better climate sans Paris

It’s time for the United States to pull out of the Paris climate agreement entirely. On Tuesday, President Trump signed an executive order that promoted American energy security by rolling back several overreaching Obama-era regulations that are central to the Paris climate pact.

Neil Gorsuch, the scholar and the man

To hear others speak of 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge and Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, it is as if the phrase “scholar and gentleman” were coined to describe him.

Related Articles

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a Cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, March 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

Political partisans within the ivy-covered halls

In her address last month at CPAC 2017, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos strongly criticized the nation's college campuses for trying to indoctrinate students. She claimed that the faculty -- "from adjunct professors to deans" -- are telling students "what to say, and more ominously, what to think. On many college campuses, if you voted for Donald Trump, you're a threat to the university community."

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media during the daily press briefing at the White House, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. Spicer discussed healthcare, immigration, and other topics. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Fake legal standing

The Hawaii federal court's recent nationwide block of President Trump's new executive order on immigration is troubling. The court's decision turns on its head the important requirement that persons have legitimate "standing" to invoke the power of the federal courts.

Illustration of Chuck Brunie by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chuck Brunie, an investor exemplar

What are more important to the health of an intellectual movement, writers and academics or investors and philanthropists? That thought occurred to me when I was informed of the death of Chuck Brunie, the former longtime chairman of the board of the Manhattan Institute and the chairman emeritus of The American Spectator.

Illustration on Kim's North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump's pivot to North Korea

America can do anything but America can't do everything, at least not within a four-year time frame. That suggests that the American president -- any American president -- needs to prioritize.

Unanswered Questions in the Mideast Conflicts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A slippery slope in Iraq and Syria

The good news is various forces are attacking ISIS (the Islamic State) and its control of territory is weakening. But as it does, historical adversaries are converging on the battlefield and American troops are standing between them in ever-increasing numbers. What began as limited airstrikes has become an American ground presence. Changes begun in the previous administration continue in the current one.

Trumpcare would hurt many

I have a rare brain disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension. It affects one in 100,000. My brain thinks it has a tumor but it doesn't and for some reason it increases production of cerebral-spinal fluid, causing intense spikes in pressure in my head. It has been so bad that the fluid has twice leaked out my ear and I have had to undergo brain surgery to repair the leaks. Doctors tried installing a shunt to direct the extra fluid into my stomach, but that shunt has now failed and I'm awaiting a surgery date to have it removed.

Making America great the first time

For decades George Melloan has been the insightful pater families of The Wall Street Journal's editorial pages. Recently he retired as deputy editor and columnist, although he continues still to contribute commentary to the paper. Yet, he also has taken time to research, report and create this charming and penetrating memoir of his life during the Great Depression and its parallels to Washington's continuing irresistible impulse to shape America to the liking of our political elites, left or right.

'Someone else's babies' Americans

When quotes like Rep. Steve King's show up in the news, it threatens the very diversity of the generations of immigrants who expanded this country into what it is today ("White House dismisses Rep. King's comments about 'someone else's babies,'" Web, March 14). When these statements are offered by an elected official charged with making decisions about modern families, it concerns child welfare advocates because it harms kids. It is critical for those in power to remember that the people of this country aren't always a mirror image of those who lead.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch talks about playing basketball with former Supreme Court Justice Byron White as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

No time to go wobbly

Washington has a bad case of whiplash. Barack Obama spent eight years pushing the nation toward the radical transformation that he couldn't openly talk about. Now President Trump is attempting to stop that train in its tracks.

President Donald Trump pauses while speaking at the National Republican Congressional Committee March Dinner at the National Building Museum, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Trump legacy

Donald Trump's greatest legacy (it's not too soon to speculate) is likely to be the end of the dependency of the rest of the world on the United States. This peculiar relationship was itself a legacy of World War II. Europe had been decimated by an earlier world war inflicted on an earlier generation, and the moral bankruptcy that followed enabled the ascendancy of the Nazis and the destruction of the Jews in Europe.

Budget Director Mick Mulvaney arrives at the Capitol with President Donald Trump to rally support for the Republican health care overhaul, in Washington, Tuesday, March 21, 2017. Mulvaney wrote in a memo late last week that until the full budget release in May, "all public comments of any sort should be limited to the information contained in the Budget Blueprint chapter for your agency," referring to the 53-page document released last Thursday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

All politics are local -- and usually stupid

I started out in journalism in a quaint little place called Prince William County, Virginia. Back then, the late 1980s, the small county was a bedroom community for Washington. Now PWC has nearly a half-million residents and has helped pushed Virginia into the Democrats' column, but back then there were fewer than 200,000 residents and the state was solidly red.

FBI Director James Comey takes a break after three hours of testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, March 20, 2017, before the House Intelligence Committee hearing on allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Comey: Media's 'wrong' a lot -- but correcting is not FBI job

- The Washington Times

James Comey, FBI director, said a mouthful about the media during congressional testimony about Russia earlier this week, making clear it wasn't his agency's job to correct the press on printed or published errors -- but also saying bluntly: Boy, they make a lot. True, but sitting idly by and letting the false narrative go forth isn't exactly praise-worthy, either.

This Dec. 9, 2016 image released by NBC shows Arnold Schwarzenegger, the new boss of "The New Celebrity Apprentice," at a press junket in Universal City, Calif.  Schwarzenegger said Friday that he's through with "The New Celebrity Apprentice," and he's blaming President Donald Trump for the television reality show's recent poor performance. The former California governor said he wouldn't mind working with NBC and producer Mark Burnett again "on a show that doesn't have this baggage." (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP)

Hey, Ahh-nold: Trump won. Let it go

- The Washington Times

Arnold Schwarzenegger -- remember him? He used to star in some of Hollywood's hottest films, some decades back -- has taken to Twitter with a 40-second rant against President Donald Trump. It's self-promotion, at its worst.

FILE- In this Dec. 15, 2016, file photo, Judge Andrew Napolitano waits for an elevator in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York. Fox News Channel has pulled legal analyst Napolitano from the air after disavowing his on-air claim that British intelligence officials had helped former President Barack Obama spy on Donald Trump.  The move was first reported by The Los Angeles Times on Monday, March 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fox benches Napolitano amid wiretap fizzle

- The Washington Times

The fallout from President Donald Trump's wiretapping claims against Barack Obama have turned from the White House toward Fox News, and now, according to several reports, Andrew Napolitano, the outlet's frequent "Judge Napolitano" legal commentator, has been benched. Eh. He'll be back. And back soon -- rightly so.

In this June 22, 2016 photo, Border Patrol agents stands near a border structure in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Illegal? Travis County, Texas, is the place to be

- The Washington Times

The Department of Homeland Security is playing the shaming game, and releasing name of jails in local communities that won't get in lawful line and honor detainer requests from the federal authorities. Good. And the award for Best Place to Get Arrested as an Illegal is ... Travis County, Texas.

File - This Monday, Dec. 21, 2015 file photograph provided by the Israeli Ministry of Defense shows a launch of David's Sling missile defense system. A senior Israeli air force official says a joint U.S.-Israeli missile interceptor will be operational soon, completing the country's multi-layer defense system. He said Monday that David's Sling, meant to counter medium-range missiles possessed by Iranian-backed Hezbollah militants in Lebanon, will be operational in early April. (Ministry of Defense via AP, File)

The Strategic Defense Initiative at 34

When a politician promises something that "holds the promise of changing the course of human history," we naturally assume it's typical overstatement. But when President Ronald Reagan said that on March 23, 1983, in reference to his Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), he was exactly right.

Innovate and Educate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Funding advanced research should be priority

There is a lot of talk and understandable handwringing about declining state revenues for higher education. The difficulty of finding funds for expansion, let alone maintenance, is often painful for college and university executives, as well as for many state leaders.