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Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending religious liberty

I write with a deep and growing concern about the future of religious liberty in the United States.

Mike Pence, Conservative Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Pence makes sense

Whenever I talk to conservatives across the country about the presidential election, a common refrain is that they find Donald Trump refreshing in many ways. They like that he eschews political correctness and promises to stand up for ordinary Americans against the elites.

SM-3 Missile Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending against the growing missile threat

Both Iran and North Korea are rogue nations developing and testing new missile technologies at an alarming rate. Iran threatens U.S. forces and has missile technology to carry out those threats. North Korea has successfully tested missiles that can be fired from submarines and is threatening to use them.

Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

Tim Kaine (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A sad tale of two disposable veeps

- The Washington Times

A governor is always a good choice for a vice president. He (or she) has learned how to run an administration, how to work with a cranky legislature and understands staying close to the people who elected him. There’s no Praetorian guard to keep him separated from the people.

Illustration on the history of the Democratic Party convention by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unconventional Democrats

It’s Democratic convention time, and while this year’s shindig may not be anything to write home about, the confabs in the old days were knock-down, drag-out affairs. For example, it took nine ballots to nominate James K. Polk in 1844; 49 for Franklin Pierce in 1852, 17 for James Buchanan in 1856, and 22 for Horatio Seymour in 1868.

Illustration on leveraging U.S. visas against China's territorial aggression in the South China Sea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Reversing China’s South China Sea grab

The South China Sea (SCS) is currently the focus of a dispute between the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei. The PRC has preemptively deployed military personnel and equipment to enforce their claims to a trumped-up, self-identified but unrecognized “nine-dash line,” an imagined boundary that is inconsistent with international law and commonly accepted international behavior.

Illustration on all terrain powered wheelchairs for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wheelchairs for veterans

Many Americans are familiar with the military creed of never leaving a fallen comrade behind, a commitment that has served as the real-life inspiration for Hollywood movies chronicling daring rescue operations under impossible odds of injured or captured service members.

In-Activist Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to defeat activists

This month, Congress passed a bill requiring all genetically improved foods to be labeled. But it’s essentially meaningless. Genetically improved foods are just as safe as the veggies in a backyard garden, and virtually all foods — organic or not — have been genetically improved at some point in their history.

Related Articles

Illustration on the potential impeachment of a President Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary's historic hat trick

The presidential election year of 2016 has been a remarkable one. For the first time in the history of the United States, a woman is the presumptive nominee of a major political party. Add to that the doubly historic incidence of the first spouse of a previous president being nominated for the same office by the same major political party.

Chart to accompany Moore article of July 18, 2016

Girding for the annual funding fight

The worst-kept secret in Washington, D.C. is that Congress will once again fail to do its most basic constitutional job and pass legislation to fund the federal government beyond the end of the current fiscal year on September 30.

FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2016 file photo, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Commissioner John Koskinen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. House conservatives on July 13, 2016, have taken the first step to force an impeachment vote on Koskinen. Conservatives accuse Koskinen of gross negligence, arguing he stonewalled their investigation into IRS targeting of conservative groups. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

When bullies get pushback

The most important thing to learn about bullies is that they don't expect resistance, and when it comes, they often back down -- but not if the pushback isn't serious.

Stifling Cost of Government Regulations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Government is the problem, not the solution'

On its face, government regulation is good. It delivers clean air and water. It stops black lung and other diseases. It interdicts miscreants who would lure you into bad investments and disciplines those who falsely promise million-dollar investment returns. Government is your protector, your friend.

Trump a changed man

Many Republicans and conservatives have one big thing in common these days: They don't trust Donald Trump. In him they see a man who has been a Democrat and has supported liberals, including the Clintons, for years. It certainly is easy to see why people distrust him, particularly when he is so bombastic, insulting and demanding.

View of the famed Promenade des Anglais scene of the Thursday's attack in Nice, southern France, Sunday, July 17, 2016 three days after a truck mowed through revelers. French authorities detained two more people Sunday in the investigation into the Bastille Day truck attack on the Mediterranean city of Nice that killed at least 84 people, as authorities try to determine whether the slain attacker was a committed religious extremist or just a very angry man.(AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Destroying radical Islam

The intelligence and law-enforcement authorities continue to sort out the career of Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, the author of the latest unspeakable outrage in France, and Omar Mateen, who inflicted the greatest mass killing in American history. Still to be sorted out is the confusion over strategy in Washington. To put it down to "confusion" is the kindest interpretation. Willful blindness and incompetence might be other interpretations.

Sea-claims ruling biased

In order to grant the Philippines a favorable ruling, the Permanent Court of Arbitration classified all islands in the South China Sea as "reefs" ("U.S., allies watch for challenge from China on court ruling over sea claims," Web, July 12). It even classified Taiping Island as a "reef."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Authors in Court: Scenes From the Theater of Copyright'

Mark Rose, research professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, engagingly tells us that he is "a Shakespearean by trade, not a lawyer." He then goes on to confess that "Nonetheless, I have some experience in legal matters, having served as an expert witness in copyright infringement cases for thirty-five years" and that he has lectured and written extensively about copyright and its history.

In this June 16, 2016 photo, CIA Director John Brennan testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Intelligence Committee.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The 28 pages on 9/11

The U.S. House Intelligence Committee finally released 28 pages of the long-suppressed findings of its investigation into the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan, and the interesting stuff appears to have been written between the lines. A reasonably talented sixth-grader can connect some of the dots.

Boris Johnson. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A rousing week for the Gaffe Patrol

- The Washington Times

The Gaffe Patrol, that brave and courageous squadron of the media that sets out to seek and destroy politicians and others who inadvertently say something to offend the code of political correctness, has had a remarkably good week here in the Lower 48.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Ghost Sniper: A Sniper Elite Novel'

With the take-down of Osama bin Laden, the most wanted man in the world, and other bold and brave military actions, the U.S. Navy SEALs and other special operations groups are respected and admired greatly. Although the elite special operators perform in a high state of operational security and secrecy, much has been written about them, as the public is very interested in these seemingly larger-than-life military men.

Washington Nationals manager Dusty Baker (12) signs for fans before a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Saturday, July 2, 2016, in Washington. The Reds won 9-4 in ten innings. (AP Photo/Nick Wass) **FILE**

D.C. sports fans don't need to prove anything

The Nationals crowd, as well as the team, is now being graded about how they will perform the rest of the season. Nationals manager Dusty Baker indicated while they watch a first-place team, the home crowd isn't exactly in first place.

Illustration on the myth of free college by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The pipe dream that is 'free college'

Hillary Clinton's plan to make college free for low- and middle-income families does not address the most fundamental challenges in higher education. No matter who pays, universities have become costly and wasteful and do a poor job of equipping young people to earn a living.

Illustration on Soros funded radical organizations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beware the Soros zombies

Billionaire George Soros has funded liberal organizations intent on bringing confusion, disarray and trouble to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland next week.