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Illustration on crony capitalism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Crony capitalism against the real thing

For the past decade, a strange migration of a couple of thousand people from all over the world to Las Vegas takes place — in the middle of July. They come — at least most — not to gamble and certainly not for the weather where the normal daytime temperature is a 100-plus degrees, but to participate in an event called FreedomFest.

President Donald Trump pauses during a joint news conference with French President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Thursday, July 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump’s right: It’s a sewer, not a swamp

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump tweeted in the lead-up to Jared Kushner’s widely waited for Senate-Russia testimony that it’s not a swamp he’s trying to drain. It’s a sewer. And yes indeed, that description is much more apt.

Righting the Ship of Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plan to save Social Security

It is no secret that what the major media seem to care most about is radically different from what concerns average Americans. While the inside-the-Beltway crowd continues to focus on alleged collusion between President Trump and Russia, real concerns like the future of Social Security are ignored.

Sudan Corruption Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A necessary delay for easing of Sudan sanctions

The announcement last week by the Trump administration that it is delaying the Obama administration’s order to ease sanctions on Sudan was a welcome decision. The three-month delay is not long enough to give the Sudanese the impression that we are not serious about this matter, but will be long enough to complete the needed and ongoing review of that government’s adherence to the requirements of sanctions-easing.

Kurdistan Partnership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A strategic U.S. partner in Kurdistan

This year is the 25th anniversary of the election of the first Parliament and government of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). Thanks to the safe haven that the United States and its European allies created in 1991 to protect the displaced Kurdish population from Baghdad’s brutal attacks, the Kurds turned a crisis into an opportunity to build a forward-looking nation with democratic aspirations.

Illustration on government run Health Care by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fake ‘health care’ debate

Confucius, who lived so long ago that famine, not obesity, menaced public health, supposedly observed that “the first step to wisdom is to call things by their proper name.” If so, then angry congressional town hall meetings and serial legislative impasses are not really about health care, let alone reform.

FILE - IN this Dec. 2, 2009, file photo, the Total Port Arthur refinery is shown in Port Arthur, Texas. Federal lawsuits against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were filed claiming the agency has failed to correct Texas air pollution control permits with loopholes that make state enforcement rare. The suits filed Thursday, July 20, 2017, by the nonprofit Washington, D.C.-based Environmental Integrity Project, target permits for the largest integrated petrochemical factory in the U.S., three refineries near the Houston Ship Channel including the largest petroleum refinery in the U.S. and a coal-fired power plant east of Dallas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Peddlers of junk science

For America’s 207 million coffee drinkers, this month’s “latest study” brought a venti-sized serving of good news: A healthy dose of coffee leads to a longer life.

Illustration on examining voter fraud by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rooting out vote fraud

Judging by the unhinged reaction this past week to the first public meeting of President Trump’s blue-ribbon voter fraud panel, progressives are terrified.

Iranian Intentions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Certifiably wrong about Iran’s compliance

During President Trump’s campaign he said that Mr. Obama’s 2015 nuclear weapons deal with Iran was the “worst deal ever.” Although there are many diplomatic deals vying for that title, the deal engineered by Mr. Obama is at least one of the worst ever for two reasons.

How to fix the Obamacare fiasco

It’s no grand revelation that Republicans have bungled the Obamacare repeal bill beyond belief. Sen. Mitch McConnell wants a Senate vote on full repeal of Obamacare with two years to come up with a replacement. This would be the ideal solution, but it appears he lacks the necessary 50 votes for passage.

In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, an F-15C Eagle from the California Air National Guard, 144th Fighter Wing, flies out of the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Restoring the military’s moral underpinnings

The Trump administration came to power with a clear mandate to restore U.S. military credibility, effectiveness, and capabilities. Such a mandate involves reversing not only the debilitating impact of sequestration on our declining military force structure, but also the Obama administration’s social engineering mandates forced on our military.

Misdirected Canadian Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Time

The travesty of rewarding a terrorist

In July 2002, Omar Khadr was accused of throwing a hand grenade and killing a U.S. Army combat medic, Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer, on the battlefields of Afghanistan. Khadr was ultimately captured, linked to al Qaeda (reportedly through his father’s connections), pled guilty, and sat in a Guantanamo Bay jail cell before being repatriated by Canada in 2012.

Robert Mueller. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump’s promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can’t continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it’s also the responsibility of Congress.

Related Articles

Sudanese Genocide War Criminal Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting Sudan on notice

If you were told that an indicted war criminal who is responsible for the death of thousands of Sudanese citizens should be allowed to gain the economic benefits of trading with the U.S., what would you say? On July 12 the Trump administration postponed a decision for 90 days on whether to continue to implement Executive Order 13761 regarding sanctions on Sudan that were established as the result of decades of violence, genocide and crimes against humanity.

Illustration on the IRGC by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran's terrorism goliath

ISIS has captivated Western attention for so long with its gruesome beheadings, stabbings, vehicular homicides, shootings and bombings in Europe and the United States, the horrific aftermaths deservedly the focus of television news, that virtually forgotten is the world's biggest terror threat -- Iran's IRGC, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.

'Green' power land, cash greedy

"Why the Greens hate nuclear power" (Web, July 9) paints a grim picture of a United States without full-time electric power from coal, natural gas and nuclear generation. Unfortunately, the situation at hand is even worse than that.

The mathematical prodigy who gave the world 'bits'

Many people, most notably Al Gore, have claimed to be the father of the information age; but Claude Shannon probably deserves the most credit. In 1948, he wrote an article that is considered to be the "Magna Carta" of information technology. In their book "A Mind at Play," Jimmy Son and Rob Goodman explain how this nearly forgotten American genius revolutionized the way we think about communications.

McCain should prove motives

Sen. John McCain's explanation of his role in obtaining and providing to the FBI copies of the so-called "Trump Dossier" smells very fishy — and without a full explanation, it will fail the smell test.

The cloud over next year

If anybody can blow a sure thing, the Republicans can, but 2018 is not shaping up yet as an opportunity for the Democrats to regain control of the U.S. Senate. Democratic candidates are raising money by the barrel, but more in partisan hope than realistic expectation.

U.S. President Donald Trump calls out to the crowd as he arrives to enter his presidential viewing stand, Sunday, July 16, 2017, during the U.S. Women's Open Golf tournament at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Restoration of the judiciary continues

Restoring the federal judiciary to its constitutional moorings is what many Americans call Job 1, and it was on this issue they put aside their considerable reservations about Donald Trump, swallowed hard, considered the alternative, hoped for the best, and cast their votes for him. On this score, he has redeemed their faith.

Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins (8) runs off the field after an NFL football game against the New York Giants in Landover, Md., Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017. The New York Giants defeated the Washington Redskins 19-10. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

LOVERRO: Cousins has been ready to move on for years

If Monday, July 17, comes and goes without a long-term contract agreement between Kirk Cousins and the Washington Redskins, it will mean that the quarterback is one step closer to the goal he set for himself after he was drafted behind Robert Griffin III in the fourth round of the 2012 NFL draft.

Stacy Harp and her father, Clayton Perrotte, have been battling the government over a typo that has changed the gender of Perrotte from male to female. (Photo courtesy of Stacy Harp)

Social Security gender war exposes bureaucratic bloat

- The Washington Times

Talk about a bureaucratic nightmare. Stacy Harp, who hosts Bible News Radio with her husband, Randall Harp, is just trying to transfer the Social Security payments for her father, Clayton Perrotte, from Florida to Tennessee. But she can't, because a government error changed her dad's gender from male to female.

In this June 28, 2017, photo, marijuana plants grow at the Desert Grown Farms cultivation facility in Las Vegas. Frenzied activity at these facilities have been focused on one goal: Getting ready for the start of recreational marijuana sales Saturday in Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Where there's smoke there's revenue

The potheads and the revenooers of Nevada are in the throes of a marijuana emergency. It's not that the potheads are smoking too much of it. It's that the revenooers can't get enough of it to the potheads. There's plenty of pot but there aren't enough drivers to transport the weed to the legal market.

The Pascagoula River floods streets as Tropical Storm Cindy drops heavy rains, Saturday, June 24, 2017, near Escatawpa, Miss. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Zealotry is no substitute for science

On its way out the door last January, the Obama administration took care to satisfy the demands of helpful special interests, issuing many new and often loosely written environmental rules. One of these, the "Waters of the United States" rule, which attempted to declare everything short of milady's bathtub a navigable river or stream, and subject to regulation by overly zealous bureaucrats, has been ruled out of order. But others just as absurd have not.

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron shake hands at the conclusion of a joint news conference at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Thursday, July 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A big Bastille Day for America

- The Washington Times

The Donald finally caught a break in Paris, basking in rare Franco-American bonhomie as he joined the new president of France on Bastille Day, this year to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the American arrival on the battlefields of World War I.

Illustration on one proposed remedy for equalizing trade by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fixing the trade deficit

President Trump is falling woefully short on his promise to fix the trade deficit. It's on track to hit $570 billion this year — up from $505 billion in 2016.

No more negativity

My husband and I have been long-time subscribers to The Washington Post, but we have finally had enough of its negativity and liberal bias. We recently decided to try The Washington Times, since the website promises to simply report the news without slant.

More youths, cheaper coverage

A recent Gallup survey found that the number of uninsured Americans increased by 2 million this year ("U.S. uninsured up by 2M this year as gains erode: Survey," Web, July 10). Coverage losses were most prominent among young adults.

Humanists not "Christophobic"

In "The separation of church and insanity" (Commentary, July 9), writer Larry W. Poland audaciously maligns millions of patriotic Americans as "Christophobic bigots" because we value the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment guarantee of religious liberty. This bedrock American value means nothing if it doesn't simultaneously protect people's freedom to practice their faith as long as that faith doesn't intrude on the rights of others, and protect people's freedom from religious imposition.

When 16th-century Venice and the Washington suburbs don't square

In the fifth of the Hogarth Press Shakespeare series, "New Boy," Tracy Chevalier transplants her version of Shakespeare's "Othello" from 16th century Venice and Cyprus to a 1970s Washington D.C. suburban school playground.