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Centennial High School senior Doyle Trout, left, and his classmates react as his childhood and high school photographs appear on the screen during the senior slide show during graduation on Saturday, May 16, 2015. Trout, a four-time state wrestling champion who lost his left leg in an accident, is going to the University of Wyoming on a wrestling scholarship. Wyoming is honoring Trout's scholarship, and he hopes to wrestle again someday but doing that won't be easy.(Francis Gardler/The Journal-Star via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; KOLN-TV OUT; KGIN-TV OUT; KLKN-TV OUT

What I know: advice for the real world

Make the face you show the world—in interviews, on the job, socially and professionally—the reflection of what’s in your heart and mind.

Paula Jones smiles during a news conference in Dallas, in this April 16, 1998, file photo. Encouraged by an outside lawyer, Paula Jones is ready to insist on $2 million, half from President Clinton and half from a New York tycoon, in exchange for dropping her sexual harassment lawsuit, two legal sources involved in the case said Saturday, Oct. 17, 1998. (AP Photo/LM Otero) ** FILE **

Paula Jones: Reprise of a famous bimbo eruption

- The Washington Times

For the Republicans, worthy or not, Hillary and Bubba are the gift that keeps on giving. Whoever is responsible for writing the thank-you notes has a big job ahead. The dynamic duo keep a network of warehouses just to house and keep track of the gifts. No wonder Hillary needs her own Internet server.

Illustration on the move to remove Andrew Jackson from the twenty dollar bill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The cheap currency of judging historical figures by today’s standards

New York Times columnist Gail Collins is on a tear. Her sense of civic rectitude oozes from her prose. Her characteristic breezy haughtiness is on full display. The moral imperative that has caught her fancy and led to two columns in as many months: Getting that angular-faced Andrew Jackson off the $20 bill and replacing him with a woman, preferably an African-American or American Indian.

Illustration on Net Neutrality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New rules make the Internet’s future look very 20th century

Like a thief in the night, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently denied eight separate petitions requesting the agency delay the implementation of new Internet regulations while they are challenged in court. While the late-afternoon news dump and decision was predictable, it is no less disappointing that the Internet will soon be subjected to 20th century telephone monopoly-era regulations.

No substitute for seriousness in Iraq

A recent weekend brought two very different dispatches from the front lines of the global war on terror. The first was a tale of tactical success; the second a narrative of strategic failure.

Positive Messages Hit the Mark Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatism, the Chevy of American leadership

Imagine General Motors trying to sell you a Chevy truck by airing an ad featuring a Ford F-150 pickup truck bursting into flames, killing a family of four and ending with anguished relatives waiting for news of their loved ones in a hospital emergency room.

Illustration on adjusting Section 215 of the Patriot Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Amending the Patriot Act, not ending it

The Senate, which will never be known for an overly demanding work schedule, returns from its week-long recess a whole day early to deal with the mess being made of one of our most important anti-terrorist intelligence programs. That program, now encompassed by Section 215 of the unfortunately named Patriot Act, has its roots in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA.

Illistration on adjusting Export-Import bank policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Reaganesque solution to the Ex-Im Bank dilemma

Opposition to the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) is now at the point where the bank’s reauthorization is genuinely in doubt. Spurred by accusations of corporate welfare, crony capitalism and outright corruption, opponents believe the Ex-Im Bank’s palpable violation of free-market principles fully warrants its early demise.

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The spying sins of the father

Of the American intelligence and military officers who spied for the Soviet Union and successor Russia, who deserves the most scorn for odious conduct? Topping any list would be Aldrich Ames of the CIA, whose treachery cost the lives of sources working for the United States, followed closely by Robert Hanssen of the FBI, who gave the KGB the bureau's "game plan" for tracking spies.

Amtrak is no way to run a railroad

If taxpayers suddenly stopped subsidizing Amtrak, what do you think would happen? Before trying to answer that question, it is useful to review U.S. railroad history. The first railroads were built in the United States in the late 1820s, and by 1900, only 70 years later, almost every town in the country had rail access. Railroads were high tech, the Internet of their time. The system was built and profitably operated by private companies.

A puzzling national defense illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Re-establishing a consensus on national defense

From al Qaeda to the Islamic State, we have learned to kill enemy leaders but not much else about basic issues of war and peace. Just last week, the media diverted attention from the scandals of Our Lady of Perpetual Ambition Hillary Rodham Clinton by asking Jeb Bush some really hard questions. Would he have done the Iraq War the same way as his brother -- or at all?

Illustration on the damage done by cutting education programs by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Giving kids a chance to succeed

It's hard to say which is more galling: when politicians want to extend the life of a program that doesn't work, or when they want to pull the plug on one that does.

Illustration on lost ethical traditions in journalism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Who is a journalist?

My first job in journalism was as a copyboy at the NBC News Bureau in Washington, D.C. In my early 20s, I asked Bill Corrigan, the newsroom manager, "What must I do to get on the air?" He replied, "Get a college degree and a minimum of five years writing experience with a newspaper or wire service."

Nepalese army men search for the missing U.S. Marine helicopter in the earthquake affected Dolakha District, Nepal, Thursday, May 14, 2015. The helicopter carrying six Marines and two Nepalese soldiers disappeared Tuesday while delivering aid in the country's northeast, U.S. officials said. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

'We stand with Nepal'

In an age of celebrity worship, when the public drapes the mantle of heroism on rock stars, film goddesses and the giants of sport who haven't done anything to earn it, it's easily forgotten that true heroes are those who risk all, including their very lives, for the sake of others. American servicemen and women fit that description, stepping fearlessly into the shadow of the valley of death.

A win in Syria -- despite Obama

The recent Army Delta Force operation in the Syrian border town of al-Amir that killed Abu Sayyaf, a leader in financial and military operations for the Islamic State, was a success ("U.S. commandos enter Syria, kill Islamic State commander in charge of oil fields," Web, May 16). It has been praised by Democrats as an example of President Obama's leadership and decision-making, but in fact it better defines the capabilities of our military leaders to get things done when not limited by Mr. Obama's lengthy deliberations and bad advice.

George Stephanopoulos during an ABC broadcast. (AP Photo/ABC, Heidi Gutman, File)

The Stephanopoulos example

George Stephanopoulos of ABC News illustrates the reason why so many Americans don't any longer trust what they read and hear from press and tube. In an earlier time he would have known better than to contribute money, and a substantial sum of it, to those he pretends to cover. "Fair and balanced" was more than a clever marketing slogan.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA $555K -The National Mall with the Lincoln Memorial, and Washington Monument are seen from the roof of the U.S. Capitol Building, on a brisk fall day in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A 'pivot' toward Asian Americans

Presidential contenders of both parties are advised to should are advised to take note: The Asian American community is the nation's fastest-growing demographic group, with China and India superseding Mexico as the countries of origin for recent immigrants, and members of this "model minority" are gradually overtaking their fellow Americans in education and income.

Jimmy Stewart in the 1939 political movie by Frank Capra,  "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (Image from Columbia Pictures, Inc)

82% of voters say ordinary citizens should run for office, not lawyers and professional politicians

- The Washington Times

Mr. Ordinary goes to Washington? Americans still dream that some sensible, honest patriot will surface in the heartland, then run for office and rescue the nation. The numbers: 82 percent of U.S. voters say the nation needs to recruit more "ordinary citizens to run for office rather than professional politicians and lawyers" -- this according to a new Fox News poll. That includes 84 percent of Republicans, 90 percent of independents and 76 percent of Democrats.

A wrong way to fix failing schools

Last week at the National Summit on Youth Violence Prevention organized by the Department of Education, the Department of Justice and other various federal agencies, Secretary of Education Secretary Arne Duncan did what leftist bureaucrats have done throughout history: announce the dream of supplanting parents with the state by taking control of children "24/7."

In this aerial photo taken May 13, 2015, emergency personnel work at the scene of a deadly train wreck in Philadelphia. Amtrak faces what probably will be a $200 million payout to crash victims _ the cap established by Congress nearly 20 years ago as part of a compromise to rescue the railroad from financial ruin. It would be the first time that the liability ceiling, considered by many to be too low to cover the costs of the eight lives lost and 200 people injured, designed for Amtrak actually would apply to the railroad.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

All aboard for more arguments

Before the wreckage of the fatal crash in Philadelphia was cleared, the politicians in Washington began to fight over the damaged carcass of Amtrak, the troubled national passenger railroad.

FILE - This Oct. 20, 2014 file photo shows George Stephanopoulos at the 24th Annual Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame Awards in New York. Stephanopoulos has apologized for not notifying his employer and viewers about two contributions totaling $50,000 that he made to the Clinton Foundation. ABC's news division said Thursday, May 15, 2015, that "we stand behind him." The donations, made in two installments in 2013 and 2014 and first reported in Politico, were made because of Stephanopoulos' interest in the foundation's work on global AIDS prevention and deforestation, he said. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

The $75,000 question

Contrary to what they sometimes think of themselves, neither journalists nor intelligence agents are 10 feet tall. They're usually intelligent, well spoken and often have sharp skills at what they do. But not always. Sometimes the best of them blunder at what they do best. Two examples are currently contributing to the buzz of the chattering class.

This image made from video provided by NASA shows part of the International Space Station with the Earth in the background on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. (AP Photo/NASA)

A new Little Ice Age?

President Obama continues to prophesy "dangerous" global warming, due to fossil fuels. Computer modelers conjure up crisis scenarios based on their assumption that carbon dioxide drives climate change.

Better funding for D.C. traditional schools illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How D.C. shortchanges public charter school students

As a parent, I believe in the original rallying cry for public charter schools in the District of Columbia -- "parental choice." Charters are publicly funded, but run independently of the traditional public school system; they were intended to extend choice to every parent regardless of income because, like the school system, charters are tuition-free public schools. But despite the government's responsibility to fund the education of all its public school students fairly, the choices and voices of the 45 percent of parents who have selected charters in the District are being disrespected.

Illustration on the need to effectively broadcast American values to the world by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rediscovering America's voice

Ideas matter. They matter so much that they cause seismic shifts in history. Extremist ideas foster revolutionary fanatics so beholden to ideology that attempting to contain them can be like placing a Band-Aid on an open wound. Sept. 11 upended previous notions of deterrence; you can't simply deter someone who intentionally dies for a cause. You also have to counter the ideology that leads him to devalue his own life and the lives of innocent others.

Illustration on the mythological impact of federal assistance on poverty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama's poverty mythology

Our class warrior in chief was at it again this week complaining about our "ideological divides that have prevented us from making progress" in solving problems like poverty. Just when you thought you'd heard it all. Our most ideological president perhaps ever is arguing that there is too much ideology in Washington. Wow. Apparently, an ideology is a firmly held belief that is held by other people -- especially those on the right.

Justice is blind

I have followed China's brutal one-child policy from its inception in 1979. Living in China at the time, I saw how poor village women were being arrested, detained and tortured -- forced to undergo sterilizations and even abortions -- all in the name of controlling population growth. I left China with their cries for help ringing in my ears.