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Supporting the Gold Standard Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Liberty and wealth require sound money

Conservatives hold that wealth and liberty correlate. This proposition was self-evident in the context of the Cold War and remains true today.

Illustration by Clement, National Post, Toronto, Canada

Bomb or occupy — or neither?

Wars usually end only when the defeated aggressor thinks it would be futile to resume the conflict. Lasting peace follows if the loser is then forced to change its political system into something other than what it was.

Illustration on options dealing with the Islamic State by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How to play the ISIS card

The Islamic State, Islamic quasi-state that has conquered parts of Iraq and Syria, has threatened America with terrorist attacks and drawn us back into an Iraq war.

Illustration on Ayaan Hirsi Ali speaking at Yale by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

God, woman and free speech at Yale

When Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the brave human-rights activist and a native of Somalia, spoke at Yale last week, 300 students turned out to listen. Others were turned away because security was so tight. The sponsors were almost apologetic because there was no controversy.

James Clapper          T.J. Kirkpatrick/The Washington Times

Throwing Clapper under the bus

When President Obama attributed the rise in Iraq of the Islamic State, or ISIS, to the failures of the U.S. intelligence community earlier this week, naming and blaming directly National Intelligence Director James R. Clapper, he was attempting to deflect criticism of his own incompetence.

Secretary of State John Kerry, center, and US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power, left, listen as President Barack Obama speaks during a bilateral meeting to discuss the Ebola epidemic with Ethiopian President Hailemariam Desalegn, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A coherent strategy for the Middle East

The latest strategy put forth by the Obama administration to combat the Islamic State jihadists not only changes weekly, but fails to address U.S. strategic core objectives in the Middle East. Most dubious is its reliance on so-called “moderate rebels” to provide a ground component to a U.S. air campaign.

Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare, one year later

As a doctor and congressman, I’m often asked what I prefer to be called. The answer for me is always doctor.

Illustration on U.S. reinvolvement against ISIS by Schot/De Volkskrant, Amsterdam, Netherlands

A Mideast policy rewritten in blood

The two most critical rules of warfare are to never tell your enemy what you will not do and to never be seen as a reluctant, vacillating warrior.

Illustration on Netanyahu's comment that ISIS and Hamas "are branches on the same poisonous tree" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The irony of endorsing Palestinians while bombing ISIS

Speaking to the United Nations General Assembly on Monday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu responded strongly to an earlier verbal attack launched by Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas.

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A woman walks past an electronic board of a local bank showing the Hong Kong share index in Hong Kong Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014. Global stocks sank under the weight of worries about the possible timing of a U.S. rate hike, economic weakness in China and an impending referendum on Scottish independence. Hong Kong's Hang Seng fell 1.9 percent to 24,705.36. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

The long-run solution to an economic mess

Yes, the world is a mess — but there is a long-run solution. The solution is a world of modest-size governmental units — like Virginia and Switzerland, with no larger entity to bail them out if they make bad decisions.

A poor way to fight poverty

It's been 50 years now since the federal government launched its "War on Poverty." But the numbers just released by the Census Bureau suggest we're in a losing battle.

Gen. James Conway            Associated Press photo

Obama's all-American show in Iraq

- The Washington Times

Several American presidents have had quarrels with their generals, sometimes for reluctance to take the fight to the enemy, occasionally for wanting to take too much fight to the foe.

Illustration on the consequences of political donor information disclosure laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The right to speak and be left alone

The best time to speak out about the policy issues you believe in is during the time of year when the most people are paying attention — the election season.

FILE - In this Nov. 23, 2011 file photo, an American flag flies from the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The federal government ran a lower budget deficit in August 2014 than a year ago, remaining on track to record the lowest deficit for the entire year since 2008. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Intelligence community ponders the 'immaculate collection'

- The Washington Times

"There’s no 'secret' version of the NIS. Our oversight committees, our partners, the public and, for that matter, even our adversaries are all seeing the very same strategic direction I'm giving to the Intelligence Community," says James R. Clapper, director of national intelligence - who also has thoughts on the current intel landscape.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Before the First Shots'

Retired Marine Corps Gen. Tony Zinni is one of the most respected and experienced military officers that the United States has produced in recent memory. He offers some reflections in "Before the First Shots Are Fired," his latest book, on the sad state of American strategy and what might be done to fix it.

Illustration on the need for ground troops by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The error of relying on air power

It is the 21st-century version of the classic question once posed by The Eagles. So who you gonna' believe: President Obama or your lyin' eyes?

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Clapper's off-target intelligence strategy

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper has just released a new National Intelligence Strategy, the first in five years. It's a highly unsatisfying read for two reasons.

Illustration on the failures of tne war on poverty by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The War on Poverty: 50 years of failure

In January 1964, President Johnson declared "unconditional war on poverty in America." Since then, the taxpayers have spent $22 trillion on Johnson's war.