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Attendees vote in the CPAC 2015 Straw Poll at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

CPAC then and now

A conservative reflects on the annual confab.

Illustration on the progressive tax structure by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Do the rich pay their fair share?

Suppose there were a banquet for 100 people and at the end of the night it was time to split the bill of $50 per person. If that bill were paid for the way we pay our income taxes, here is how it would work. Those in the top half of income would pay roughly $97 each and those in the bottom half of the income would pay an average of $3 each. Almost 40 people would pay nothing. And the single richest person in the room would cough up $1,750.

Illustration on the state of American liberty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

CPAC, freedom and saving the country

Attendees of last week’s Conservative Political Action Committee (CPAC), the nation’s largest conference for conservatives, heard a few tried and true conservative messages from potential presidential candidates and activists alike — calls for lower taxes, more freedom for business, a strong national defense, the importance of killing the enemy and the need for a serious foreign policy.

Illustration on continuing political and existential threats to Israel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Much ado about the wrong Israeli controversy

The brouhaha over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s March 3 speech to Congress is diverting attention from more important U.S.-Israel controversies that will escalate soon after this comparatively minor contretemps fizzles out.

Illustration on patent protection by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent ‘reform’ is killing the right to invent

With the best intentions, and naively going along with the corporate world’s hugely financed publicity machine, Congress is about to stomp on America’s most creative citizens, its inventors.

Illustration on the non-efficacy of "evidence-based" review of government programs by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama’s bogus cure for boondoggles

In the 1930s, peasants who were starving due to the Soviet regime’s brutal farm collectivization policy lamented, “If only Stalin knew.” Nowadays, American social scientists look at floundering federal programs and lament: “If only Congress knew.” The solution, they say, is the “evidence-based” reform movement, which will magically beget a new era of good governance.

The Folly of Food Labels Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Package police on the prowl

Britain and Australia both have images of Queen Elizabeth on their money, use the metric system, and add the letter “u” to words like “color.” Soon they could have another thing in common: Neither will have branding on their cigarette packages.

Illustration on Obama's veto of the Keystone pipeline by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Killing Keystone

In the days leading up to President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline, 14 oil tanker railroad cars derailed in West Virginia and exploded in a fiery environmental disaster.

Illustration on safety improvements to oil rail transport by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tanking up on safety

Railroads share the public’s deep concern for the safe movement of crude oil by rail and, as recent incidents have shown us, freight railroads and others who share responsibility for the shipment of oil must continue to make improvements to ensure public confidence.

Peace in the Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Like-to-like ethnic migration in the Middle East

Population shifts resulting from Syria’s four-year-long civil war have profoundly changed Syria and its three Arabic-speaking neighbors: Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan. (Turkey and Israel have changed too, but less so.) Ironically, amid tragedy and horror, as populations adapt to the brutal imperatives of modern nationalism, all four countries are becoming a bit more stable. That’s because the fighting has pushed peoples to move from ethnic minority status to ethnic majority status, encouraging like to live with like.

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A new Dr. Seuss book is due in July - based on long lost manuscript and artwork. (Random House)

Green eggs and what? New Dr. Seuss book to be published from long lost manuscript and artwork

- The Washington Times

It's been a quarter century since the last Dr. Seuss book was published. But his widow and a former secretary revealed Wednesday that they made a startling discovery: The pair found a box filled with an original manuscript plus artwork by the beloved children's author in the old office space of his California home. And voila. A new book titled "What Pet Should I Get?" will be published by Random House Children's Books, to be released July 28.

Teach Civics in School Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Looking for a Presidents Day bargain

Another Presidents Day, like the presidents it was meant to honor, has come and gone and nobody remembers what it was all about, beyond another three-day weekend for federal employees and a little hype to sell automobiles and snake oil. Presidents Day replaces holidays to mark the birthdays of Washington and Lincoln, and now, presumably, the catch-all honor is extended to William Henry Harrison, Chester Alan Arthur and Millard Fillmore as well.

Shameful talking heads

Mohammed Saeed al-Sahhaf, AKA "Baghdad Bob," was a former Iraqi diplomat. He came under worldwide ridicule while acting as the spokesperson for the Saddam Hussein regime during the 2003 Gulf War.

Roots of Terrorism Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The futility of appeasing terror

Terrorism was born and has been abroad in the Middle East for decades, only now it is under an Islamic umbrella. Before there was Islamist terrorism, there was Palestinian terrorism. Of course, extremist Islam is a dimension of today's turmoil that cries out for reform.

Jon Stewart Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Jon Stewart, exit stage left

The irrepressible New York Times is at it again. First it destroys the credibility of the most trusted newsreader in America, Brian Williams, and leaves him in a heap, exposed as a flagrant liar. Now it is destroying the credibility of the most trusted comic in America, Jon Stewart, and intent on leaving him, too, in a heap, exposed also as a flagrant liar. The New York Times used all of its investigative skills to expose Mr. Williams, and it is using them again to expose the wretched Mr. Stewart.

Businesses are fleeing California's high taxes and strict regulations. (AP Photo/Lansing State Journal, Rod Sanford)

Fleeing California

More than a century ago, Roy Farmer, 20, went door-to-door in Los Angeles with his bags of home-roasted coffee beans. By the 1930s, Farmer Brothers was selling coffee to restaurants throughout the nation. Today the company employs 1,200 men and women and generates $200 million in annual sales to restaurants, convenience stores, hospitals, hotels and universities.

Victory at all Costs Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The face of evil

The graphic pictures of a Jordanian pilot being burned alive by militants from the Islamic State, or ISIS, were chilling and raised doubts about the humanity of the Islamic terrorists capable of such barbarism. This coupled with beheadings and crucifixions gives us a better understanding of the evil we, along with the rest of the world, are facing.

Infrastructure in Need of Repair Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rebuilding the American powerhouse

Our infrastructure is collapsing, and Americans know it. They see it every day in the potholes they drive over, the bridges in their communities that have been shut down and the water pipes that burst.

The  Maryland State House dome standing above buildings in Annapolis.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Protecting aging senators

Anything goes, we suppose, in politics as in love and war. Life expectancy in the United States now stands at 78.8 years, and Maryland Democrats, stung by losing the governorship last November, are trying to change the rules of Senate succession to protect their aging senators.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has a small lead in early polls in New Hampshire. (Associated Press)

Jockeying for poll position

The grueling political marathon for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination has begun, with three contenders out in front and everyone else far behind.

How the Spanish Civil War shaped history

Richard Rhodes has a way of taking on big topics and famous incidents and locales from Hiroshima to Hollywood and writing about them in prose that is both accessible and memorable.

Corruption of Green Energy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Peeking behind the ‘green’ curtain

This week Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber, a Democrat, leaves office, having resigned under the cloud of a cronyism and corruption scandal. A U.S. attorney has subpoenaed "records that are a catalog of Kitzhaber's climate and economy-related initiatives," centering on money given to Mr. Kitzhaber's fiancee Cylvia Hayes. Ms. Hayes served a curious triple role of "first lady," adviser to the governor on energy policy and well-compensated consultant for the "clean energy" industry.