Skip to content

Happening Now

EXCLUSIVE: Rusty Humphries with Sarah Palin

Opinion

Featured Articles

Hiroshima

No second thoughts about a bomb for Hiroshima

- The Washington Times

The pointless debate continues. As reliable as the arrival of the scorching heat and drenching humidity of August, comes the debate (mostly by academics) over whether the United States is guilty of moral outrage for having dropped the atomic bombs on Japan on Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, to put an end to the carnage of World War II.

Illustration on the virtues of the private Donald Trump               The Washington Times

The two Donald Trumps

Love him or hate him, no one has been able to figure out Donald Trump. No one, that is, except Norma Foerderer.

Illustration on Russian advances in the arctic by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Playing catch-up in the Arctic

The U.S. Government Accountability Office says that the Obama administration is forcing our military to measure ice levels in the resources-rich Arctic. The president’s thinking, according to reports, is that shrinking ice could force us to institute a “military and homeland security presence” in the region.

Rica Madrid poses for a photograph as she rolls a joint in her home on the first day of legal possession of marijuana for recreational purposes, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, in Washington. Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser defied threats from Congress by implementing a voter-approved initiative on Thursday, making the city the only place east of the Mississippi River where people can legally grow and share marijuana in private. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Tracking the trends

Why do we follow the news? To be informed, of course. We naturally want to be aware of what’s happening at home and around the world.

Illustration on the civil rights of the unborn by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the abortion tide turns

Anew Facebook profile photo is beginning to spread on the Internet, especially among members of the rising millennial generation. It’s a picture of a baby within the womb. Superimposed on the baby is an equal sign.

Illustration of myths about the benefits of raising the capital gains tax by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five myths about capital gains taxes

The late, great Jack Kemp, an architect of the Reagan tax cuts, used to say “without capital, capitalism is just another ism.” Capital is the plant, the machinery, the computers, and trucks that businesses invest in to become productive and efficient providers of goods and services.

Empowering individual workers rather than union bosses

This week, Sen Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, and Rep. Tom Price, Georgia Republican, introduced a new proposal to rebalance the rights and the law regarding employees and union bosses. The Employee Rights Act (ERA) is a package of widely supported reforms that will stop workplace abuses of both union and non-union employees by big labor unions. The ERA gives individual employees the power to control their own money, personal information, and choice for legal representation in the workplace.

Illustration on arming airline pilots by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring safety in airliner cockpits

Airline pilots have always been armed, except for a period from 1988 to 2002 when passivity in the face of violence somehow seemed logical. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, many wondered why pilots were ever disarmed. Congress passed the law that rearmed airline pilots with large, bipartisan, veto proof majorities in both houses of Congress. Rearming airline pilots has proven to be safe, very inexpensive and a highly effective deterrent to those who would use civilian airliners filled with innocent people as weapons of mass destruction.

Illustration on Union violence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Closing a union-violence loophole

On July 20, U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson sentenced Joseph Dougherty, the former boss of Philadelphia-based Local 401 of the Ironworkers union, to 19 years in prison for “overseeing a years-long campaign of sabotage, arson, and intimidation,” as Philadelphia Inquirer staff writer Jeremy Roebuck put it. Mr. Dougherty’s targets were nonunion construction employees and employers.

(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Related Articles

Respect differences

An armed man walks into building, opens fire and kills nine people, all of the same race. Who or what provided this opportunity? Can one walk into a shopping mall, movie theater or restaurant, randomly open fire and kill nine people of a specific race? It certainly could not happen at a public school or university, a military base or any other government institution. How ironic that it took a church to provide such a target-rich environment. Yet places of worship is the very place where diversity is taught as virtue, and not enforced as law.

No haircut for the First Amendment

Once upon a time, the idea of giving the First Amendment a haircut never occurred to anyone. The constitutional guarantee of free speech was held to be the cornerstone of the unique American experiment in government of the people, by the people, and for the people. The Founding Fathers wrote it, plain, direct and so unambiguous that even a United States senator could understand it.

Liz Sullivan, mother of Kathryn Steinle, is consoled by Sabine Durden as she cries during the testimony of Kathryn's father Jim Steinle during a Senate Judiciary hearing in Washington on Tuesday. The family told Congress they support changing the laws that allowed her alleged killer to remain in the United States despite being deported several times. (Associated Press)

No sanctuary for lawbreakers

There's bad immigration news, but it's leavened by news that is a little better. The bad news is that the Center for Immigration Studies puts the number of illegal aliens crossing the border by the seventh year of the Obama administration at 2.5 million. The better news is that the number of illegals swarming to the United States has leveled off, owing to hundreds of thousands who have gone home. Arrivals and departures are now about even.

Fracking Protest Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Nonsensical 'fractivist' pipeline hysteria

The anti-fracking movement has moved beyond the realm of the petty and unseemly into the ridiculous. Led by Yoko Ono, the avant-garde artist and widow of musician John Lennon, fracktivists are trying to stop construction of pipelines that would carry natural gas from the Marcellus Shale region in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and the Utica Shale region in Ohio to markets in New York and New England.

Scuttle Obama's Iran deal, or surrender

The fundamental flaws in President Obama's deal with Iran have become well known. Among them: Iran's rulers will have the power to delay or even prevent inspections of suspected nuclear weapons facilities; Iran's rulers will receive tens of billions of dollars that they can spend as they please, including on terrorist groups; Iran's rulers will have several paths to nuclear weapons -- they have promised only not to rush. In the past, such promises have hardly been ironclad.

Illustration on how damaging Obama's comments are by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama's careless words

"Things fall apart," as Yeats was wont to say, "The center cannot hold." The center is most assuredly falling apart today, and who is at the center? Well, his name is Barack H. Obama. He is our president, and I think many Americans wish he would shut down. Every time he pipes up, especially on a peripheral issue, he makes things worse -- no, not worse, appalling.

FDA Attack on Antibacterial Soap Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Germ warfare at the FDA

Environmentalists have opened a new front in their long-running war against man-made chemicals. The latest battle is over antibacterial hand soaps, which have long been used to fight germs and stop the spread of bacteria in hospitals, in schools and in the home.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Triumph of the Ecunnau-Nuxulgee'

Until my wife put a stop to it, I used to jibe at dinner-table advocates of the "all white people are racists" school of history by recalling that long before the first African slaves were sold in Jamestown in 1619, our Indian brothers were skilled both as slave takers and sellers of tribal captives.

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks at the National Press Club in Washington in this April 29, 2015, file photo. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) ** FILE **

Tapping the taxpayer till

There's always that one moment in a horror film when everyone thinks the villain has been killed, then bam -- up he jumps, to the surprise of everyone.

The Times Square military recruiting station displays insignia for each military branch, Friday, July 17, 2015, in New York.  Security at military recruiting and reserve centers will be reviewed in the aftermath of a deadly shooting in Tennessee. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Give the soldiers a gun

The attacks on military recruiting offices continue because they're attractive targets for terrorists and they are, by necessity, located in vulnerable places. They're placed in high traffic areas so they will be highly visible -- they're intended to attract attention -- and they're staffed by soldiers, sailors and Marines shorn of the weapons they're trained to use.

President Obama asked Americans to wait for more facts about the Chattanooga shootings, and did not use the word "terror" to describe the attack. (Associated Press)

Obama takes his deal to the U.N.

President Obama got the endorsement of his Iranian "deal" Monday that probably means the most to him, a unanimous vote by the United Nations Security Council. Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N, and Gholamali Khoshroo, the Iranian ambassador the U.N., fell over each other to get up to say what a terrific occasion the day was.

Illustration on the values of "flyover" America by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Where people look after each other

- The Washington Times

While few admit it, the Washington, D.C. area has about as much in common with the real America as John Phillips Sousa's marches have to do with rap music. We live in a very weird bubble. Virtually everyone has a government job or a job that exists in the private sector only because of the government. We're obsessed with politics and many of us spend hours at our televisions watching Fox, MSNBC, or CSPAN and public television.

The Folly of EPA Claims about Mercury Emissions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dispelling the deadly air pollution myth

The Supreme Court's recent rejection of the Environmental Protection Agency's mercury emissions rule for coal-fired power plants sets up a much-needed showdown over a key health claim underpinning the agency's so-called "war on coal," and global warming and ozone initiatives.

Illustration on exposing government officials who contribute to government abuse and oppression by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Above the law

What recourse does a citizen have when government employees violate the law and do harm, and then they are protected by the government? Government was created to protect person and property and ensure liberty, but it has increasingly become the abuser rather than the protector.

Illustration on Obama is no Reagan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memo to Obama: You're no Reagan

At his press conference last Wednesday, our president of self-regard again linked himself with Ronald Reagan, seeking to equate his supposed success in gaining a deal with Iran not to build a nuclear weapon for 10 years to Reagan's arms control negotiations with the Soviet Union.

Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press)

Hillary Clinton tries to go home again

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton returned to the scene of the original crime Saturday night, telling the surviving Democrats in Arkansas why they should love her like she and Bill love themselves.