Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A lesson from Yemen

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

Related Articles

Illustration on French "free speech" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What freedom of speech?

The photos of 40 of the world's government leaders marching arm-in-arm along a Paris boulevard on Sunday with the president of the United States not among them was a provocative image that has fomented much debate. The march was, of course, in direct response to the murderous attacks on workers at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo by a pair of brothers named Kouachi, and on shoppers at a Paris kosher supermarket by one of the brothers' comrades.

General William Donovan works in the OSS headquarters offices during World War II. (OSS Society)

Saved from the wrecking ball? New plans emerge for OSS HQ, historic home to the nation's top spies

- The Washington Times

Three cheers, and perhaps a 21-gun salute for a rare cultural victory in the age of hasty conclusions and insta-buildings. The General Services Administration is now mulling over practical ways to preserve one of the most unique clutch of buildings in the nation's capital, all previously faced with a most undignified tear down. The august former headquarters of the Office of Strategic Services - that's the precursor of the CIA - were at risk of facing the bulldozer, potentially to fall in favor of new office space for the Department of State, which stands close by, as does the Lincoln Memorial, Kennedy Center and multiple historic sites.

From Salman Rushdie to Charlie Hebdo

Let's get a few things straight: The slaughter of eight satirical journalists in Paris last week was not a tragedy. It was an atrocity. While you may have been shocked by the attack on Charlie Hebdo, anyone who was surprised has not been paying close attention to the events unfolding over recent decades.

FILE - This Aug. 13, 2014 photo shows an array of mirrors at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating site in Primm, Nev. The largest solar power plant of its type in the world, promoted as a turning point in green energy, isn’t producing the expected energy and one of the reasons is as basic as it gets: The sun isn’t shining as often as expected. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Where the sun doesn’t shine

Solar panels are one of the favorite hopes on the left for clean and renewable, energy. The evangelists for the sun claim that solar power capacity will double this year, and point out to the credulous that government programs offer tax breaks and incentives to encourage Americans to put up solar panels, and government-funded solar farms, like California's Ivanpah facility, are popping up like mushrooms (which actually prefer dark places) across the country.

Rube Goldberg, M.D.

A folk song inspired by Philip Klein's latest book might be called "Shall We Overturn?" Just imagine a Bizarro Pete Seeger croaking out, "Shall we overtuuurn? Shall we overtuuuurn? Shall we overturn Obamacare some day?"

Illustration on competition between Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney for campaign funding by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

GOP heavyweights vie for the establishment endorsement

- The Washington Times

The word last week that 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney is thinking about a third run for the Oval Office took many Republicans and particularly many establishment Republicans by surprise. The Bush family's latest contender had already made it clear that he will run and his friends were working to clear the field for him, the talking heads were anointing him as the "adult" in the race, and other wannabes were supposedly reining in their ambitions.

Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald, tapped to clean up the VA after reports of secret waiting lists and botched care, took office with a vow to protect whistleblowers. (Associated Press)

Our veterans need not wait for care

When a rare example of a bipartisan work produced a bill that passed Congress and was signed into law by President Obama, the country heaved a sigh of relief for our veterans: Something was being done to get them the care they need.

Investing in America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a better America

Warren Buffett became very rich and very famous because he is a terrific investor. Not everyone agrees with his political stances, but his ability to achieve great return on investment is unquestioned.

Paris no-show matches rest of presidency

President Obama's failure last week to make an appearance joining world leaders in solidarity against the terrorist attacks in Paris highlighted six years of failed leadership ("Obama's snub of Paris," Web, Jan. 12). This failure has resulted in the unfettered growth of al Qaeda and Islamic State terrorists throughout the Middle East, Africa and the world, and it puts America and the west at extreme risk.

In this March 11, 2013 file photo is a sign reading "Stop the Transcanada Pipeline" placed in a field near Bradshaw, Neb. Even if the Republican-led Congress approves the Keystone XL pipeline, not a drop of oil will flow through the system until Nebraska signs off on its route. The routing process is still before the state Supreme Court, and depending on how justices rule, it could be months or longer before any construction in Nebraska begins. (Associated Press)

Taking a vow of poverty

Cursing the darkness may be more satisfying than lighting a candle, but it ultimately keeps everyone in the dark. President Obama vows to veto construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which the House approved by a wide margin on Friday. His steadfast opposition to the energy conduit from Canada places him squarely in league with those who measure human progress only with a thermometer.

California rightly puts chicken first

Large majorities of both Republican and Democratic California voters passed the new farm animal protection law that just took effect this month, and they were right to do it ("Breaking eggs in California," Web, Jan. 7).

Bleeding Arabian Satire Shield Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Charlie Hebdo and the pointed pen

France suffered through a horrifying series of terror attacks last week. Streets rang with the alarming sound of gunshots. Two agonizing hostage situations gripped the nation — and beyond. Blood was shed, and innocent life was lost.

A call to arms, with humor

Mark Steyn's appeal has spread quickly in these early-21st century years. A big hit particularly in the English-speaking world, the author-analyst-humorist is best known in the United States as a frequent substitute on "The Rush Limbaugh Show," America's most popular radio talk show.

Associated Press Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Obama's snub of Paris

If Barack Obama has demonstrated one talent in his six years at the White House it's a unique "gift" for shutting his ears to the music of America. The man who says the Muslim call to evening prayer is the sweetest sound in his ears is deaf to the sounds that warm the hearts and stir the souls of the rest of us.

Illustration on France's response to Islamic terrorism by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Is Paris burning?

The late Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times, Paul Conrad, frequently used religious symbols to illustrate his point of view. Conrad drew the ire of some readers whenever he used the Star of David or a cross in his drawings. Letters to the editor denounced him, but to my knowledge no one showed up at the newspaper to kill him.

Charlie Hebdo killers hijacked Islam

Last Wednesday's attack at the Paris headquarters of magazine Charlie Hebdo was a cowardly, heinous act which does not have any basis in Islam. As a Muslim woman I find myself repeating over and over that Islam is a religion of peace and terrorists have hijacked my faith.

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park in Alaska, view from Dead Dog Hill. Credit: National Park Service

Paying for the national parks

America's national parks are national treasures, unique in their natural beauty, geological features and recreational opportunities. The parks rescued millions of acres from waste and often thoughtless abuse. Since President Ulysses Grant set aside a federal preservation in 1872, the national park system has evolved to become the envy of other nations.