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Illustration on the deteriorating economy by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

A slam dunk for Republicans

A menacing black cloud is looming over our economy that should make the 2016 presidential election a slam dunk for Republicans — depending on who the GOP nominates this summer.

Millennials’ time to choose

The younger generation is tired of the set party rhetoric that permeates every area of society and we are ready for it to change.

Illustration on the need for impartiality in the courts by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Being fair and neutral

Americans rely on fair and impartial courts to safeguard the rights and freedoms they hold dearest. We can be confident in the courts’ authority to safeguard those rights only if we believe that judges are upholding the rule of law, ensuring fairness and fulfilling their obligations with objectivity and neutrality.

Difficult Diplomacy with Bahrain Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Bahrain bullies

Bahrain King Hamad al Khalifa visited President Vladimir Putin in Russia this week in a perfectly-timed reminder of how drastically the Obama administration has failed to handle relations with the small Gulf kingdom over the last five years.

Illustration of various valentines and postcards sent to Congress in support of Woman's suffrage             The Washington Times

Veiled valentines and suffragettes, 1916

The story of the women’s movement for the 19th Amendment or — voting rights amendment — is well known, in terms of the dramatic public demonstrations — from picketing, parades, prison sentences and hunger strikers.

Illustration on the truth about gun control by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Why gun control is a loser for the Democrats

There is nothing so comforting as a closely held prejudice, even when it repeatedly harms you. The white-hot passion of Democratic politicians to restrict and even strip Americans of their constitutionally guaranteed right to buy, own, keep, shoot and carry firearms continues as a monument to self-abuse.

U.N. Policies on Global Warming Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The politics behind the anti-fossil fuels campaign

History shows Earth’s climate goes through cycles, long and short, tied to a variety of natural factors. In the latter part of the 20th century, some scientists began to wonder about the causes of a modest warming, then cooling, then warming, which had been occurring since the mid-1800s. They also began to worry about the possible implications of continued warming.

After a speech at the Illinois State Capitol, President Barack Obama stops at the Hoogland Center for the Arts in Springfield, Ill.(Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Obama is no incompetent

While he was mocked for his performance in the last debate and had a disappointing showing in New Hampshire, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said what none of his rivals are willing to admit: “Let’s dispel [sic] with the fiction that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing. He knows exactly what he’s doing. He is trying to change this country” — with astonishing success.

Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Related Articles

Chart to accompany Moore article of Feb. 1, 2016

Judging the tax plans

With the first real votes being cast in the presidential race on Monday, this is an opportune moment to do some last-minute comparison shopping on the candidate tax reform plans. On this issue there's a lot to cheer about. All the Republican candidates have crafted plans that would slash tax rates for everyone and most would vastly simplify the thousands of pages of IRS tax code too.

Abbas no partner for peace

Thank you for your editorial "The Obama legacy" (Web, Jan. 21), which notes the Palestinian terror campaign of stabbings, car rammings and shootings that has killed 25 Israelis, an Eritrean, an American and a Palestinian, and observes that although there is "no evidence of central direction from the Palestinian leadership ... they are clearly the result of a vicious campaign of hatred and pleas to spill Jewish blood."

Memo to Mabus: Butt out

Will the Obama administration's need to undermine tradition and efficiency in the United States never be satisfied? Now Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, whose own military background amounts to a very brief Navy enlistment, has decided that he knows more about managing the U.S. Marine Corps than the men who have dedicated their lives to just that ("Liberal Democrat slams 'ridiculous' Navy chief for forcing female integration on Marines," Web, Jan. 12).

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves after speaking during a campaign stop on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, in Gilbert, S.C. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)

Now to the real show

Soon the voters in Iowa will get a little relief from the invasion of candidates, their handlers, and the tsunami of reporters, pundits and assorted wise men who have trudged through snow and ice to make sure that no burp of the body politic goes unheard or unremarked. Iowans will get their state back, and to relish once more the silence of the cornfields.

Migrant children Nor, Saleh and Hajaj Fatema from Syria sleep outside the Swedish Migration Board, in Marsta, Sweden. Interior Minister Anders Ygeman says Sweden could deport between 60,000 and 80,000 asylum-seekers in coming years. (Jessica Gow/TT News Agency via AP, File)

Scandinavia learns a hard lesson

The rewards of pride and piety have suddenly expired in Scandinavia. The northern democracies, accustomed to dispensing unwanted tutelage in sanctimony, have canceled their welcome for the wave of migrants from the Middle East and North Africa trying to break down the door to Europe.

Laws to Stop Coal Production Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Welcome Back Carter'

President Obama's plot to use the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to kill federal coal mining with a thousand paper cuts is not the first time he has used NEPA to try to end energy development. Disturbingly, his scheme is a throwback to President Carter and a decade-long moratorium that ended only when President Reagan took office. Meanwhile millions of Americans, vast regions and the nation's economy will suffer.

Illustration on the expanding TSA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Refocusing the TSA

The new Transportation Security Administration (TSA) administrator is saying and doing a lot of smart things. Among them, he stopped the practice of randomly placing unknown air travelers into abridged screening, calling it an "untenable risk." Smart. He has refocused his agency on security after years of lax management and public pressure shifted its priority to traveler convenience.

The Value of One Life Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Martian family values

Holed up during the Blizzard of 2016, I was a grateful recipient of our DVD-collecting neighbor's brand new copy of the Matt Damon film "The Martian."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates'

As a scholarly truism holds, "every generation rewrites history to suit itself," the same might be said for every historian, and every news anchor who wants to be one. Brian Kilmeade of "Fox and Friends" (with ghostwriter Don Yaeger), gave us "George Washington's Secret Six" and now has penned another look at our Republic's early years through a lens ground to his own prescription.

Former President George H.W. Bush visited the CIA on Friday to mark the 40th anniversary of his swearing in as the Agency's director in 1976. (CIA)

George H.W. Bush pays a call on the CIA

- The Washington Times

The CIA had a noteworthy visitor Friday. Former President George H.W. Bush returned to the agency's headquarters just outside the nation's capital to mark the 40th anniversary of his swearing-in as Director of Central Intelligence, and almost to the day. "He is credited with restoring focus and boosting morale in the institution, and he remains one of the most beloved Directors in the agency's history," the CIA stated in a historic overview.

Islamic Relief provides needed aid

The picture of Islamic Relief Worldwide painted by Kyle Shideler in "Funding terrorists must end" (Web, Nov. 29) is riddled with inaccuracies. It undermines the good name of an organization trusted by governments, U.N. agencies and hundreds of thousands of donors to deliver life-saving aid around the world.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a question from a member of the audience during a campaign event at the Knoxville School District Administration Office, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, in Knoxville, Iowa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The election when nobody showed up

- The Washington Times

Why are the front-runners in both parties so unelectable? The frenzied and the frightened count the ways, without getting into the depth and breadth and height a body's soul can reach.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Unspeakable Things'

By definition you cannot speak about unspeakable things, so writing about them in a novel called "Unspeakable Things" presents significant problems. Author Kathleen Spivack solves these by letting some things get lost in the haze of time, while obscuring others behind the curtains and closed doors that are so common in this novel. Some scenes she merely sketches, but others appear in brilliant color: vivid, entertaining, and often quite frightening.

Illustration on new recognition of Drone pilots and remote control combat contributions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'R' is for respect

Ever since David felled Goliath with a slingshot, militaries have sought to deal death from a distance. Whereas David's ingenuity earned him accolades, rank, and ultimately the throne, his successors in asymmetric warfare are often derided for their physical remove from the battlefield.

Illustration on supply, demand and costs in U. S. healthcare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why health insurance premiums are rising

We shouldn't be surprised that health insurance premiums continue to rise at record rates — by 15-20 percent for many employers and their employees in 2016 alone. Between private insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, the number of insured Americans has grown dramatically to nearly 90 percent of the population.

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2015 file photo, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, right, makes a point as Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas listens on during the Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas. Ted Cruz once proudly wore a belt buckle reading “President of the United States” borrowed from George H.W. Bush. He campaigned and worked for, and helped write a book lavishing praise on, that former president’s son, Dubya. And the endorsement of George P. Bush, the family’s latest rising political star, lent credibility to Cruz’s then little-known 2012 Senate campaign. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

How to fix the debates

Donald Trump has a knack for drawing attention to a problem, but rarely has a way to fix it. He has done that again, largely by accident, with his row with Fox News over the Republican debates.

In this Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 photo, Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party, DPP, presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen raises her hand as she declares victory in the presidential election, in Taipei, Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana, FIle)

Good news from Taiwan

The Republic of China (Taiwan) has become an economic powerhouse, the fifth largest in Asia and in the top 20 in the world, and even more important, its political institutions are stable. Real growth has averaged about 8 percent over the past three decades. The older labor-intensive industries have steadily moved elsewhere, replaced by technology-intensive industries.

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during a campaign event at Heartland Acres Agribition Center, on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, in Independence, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

In America, faith matters

The presidential candidates have been talking about God lately, which is understandable because most of them haven't a prayer of being elected.

Our Moral Compass on Syria Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Say it's not so

Is this the United States of America that continuously defers to Russia and Iran, and thereby to the Syria of Bashar al Assad? Do our own actions and words enable one of the most murderous and cruel, destructive and destabilizing, regimes the world has ever seen? Have we so lost our strategic sense and moral compass that we knowingly repeat policies that have made war and atrocities in Syria worse?