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Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, wearing an army uniform, ride on an armed truck to patrol the international airport in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 28, 2015. Yemen's President Abed Raboo Mansour Hadi, speaking at an Arab summit in Egypt on Saturday, called Shiite rebels who forced him to flee the country "puppets of Iran," directly blaming the Islamic Republic for the chaos there and demanding airstrikes against rebel positions continue until they surrender. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Why Yemen matters

Thoughts on the shifting dynamics in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama’s love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That’s good enough for me. He says he’s a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that’s good enough for God it’s good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they’re working on it).

Obamacare in a death spiral illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obamacare flying machine begins a death spiral

The Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, the case challenging the Obama administration’s decision to award tax credits for health insurance sold through federally established exchanges, could turn on the question of whether a ruling that ends the tax credits on federal exchanges might cause something known as a “death spiral” in health insurance markets.

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz’s announcement this week that he’s running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the “1 percent.” While it’s still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it’s assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee’s platform.

Illustration on the lack of U.S abortion data by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unhealthy state of abortion statistics

Abortion advocates in Congress and in state legislatures claim that abortions are “safe.” Yet numerous, long-standing problems at the state and federal level illustrate that the abortion data collection and reporting system in the United States is haphazard and dysfunctional, making assertions about “abortion safety” unreliable.

Illustration on the Cotton letter's impact on nuclear talks with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tom Cotton, tragic hero

The snarky quip attributed to 19th-century French Foreign Minister Charles Maurice de Talleyrand — “It was worse than a crime; it was a blunder” — has recently been making the rounds to deride a letter written by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and signed by 46 other senators.

Illustration on entering the presidential race by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The learning curve of a candidate

As we stand about 20 months out from Election Day 2016, I have much to learn in terms of becoming both a better candidate and a better potential president of the United States. I do not take the opportunity lightly.

Illustration on the value of the U.S. satellite system by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Launching the crown jewels

If America didn’t have hundreds of satellites in orbit, our Air Force, Navy and Army — as well as our intelligence agencies — wouldn’t be deaf, dumb and blind. But they’d come close. Our aircraft, ships and submarines are designed to depend on satellites for their high-technology capabilities.

Cherry-picking statistics illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Missing the mark on climate change skepticism

During the past few weeks, a series of articles in the press have implied that Willie Soon, a well-known global-warming skeptic, had violated ethical standards by failing to disclose information about research funding.

Rainbow flag. (Wikipedia)

Panic inside the lavender bubble

- The Washington Times

Life can be good inside a bubble, where the sun always shines, life is a bowl of cherries and it comes with whipped cream and no calories. You could ask almost anyone in San Francisco, where the only disappointment inside the lavender bubble is among the gay caballeros who don’t get to carry the six-foot papier-mache penis to lead the annual Gay Pride Parade.

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An Orthodox Jewish man walks past a billboard of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv, Israel, Monday, March 16, 2015, a day ahead of legislative elections. Netanyahu is seeking his fourth term as prime minister. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

A long night for Bibi

Benjamin Netanyahu faces a long election night. As election day dawns on Tuesday, his Likud Party trails by four seats in election-eve polling. He has barnstormed the country, warning voters of the consequences of turning the security of Israel over to his rivals, with apologies for his government's lack of attention to the economic plight of the average Israeli family.

Harm will define Obama tenure

For Justice Department attorneys to state with a straight face before the Fifth Circuit and claim irreparable harm to five million criminal aliens if amnesty is not granted is to spit in the face of every American citizen and valued legal guest.

Uncover Clinton email truth

Hillary Clinton does not want her private emails made public, but as an American citizen I don't want public emails kept private. Mrs. Clinton made a poor decision, and for that the American public should not be left in the dark.

Illustration on shedding light on Federal pension records by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The dark secrets of federal pensions

It's national Sunshine Week across America. During this week, good-government groups advocate for open government and transparency. One area that remains hidden is federal pensions.

You borrowed it, you repay it

The theme for the first Bill Clinton presidential campaign in 1992 was Fleetwood Mac's "Don't Stop (Thinking About Tomorrow)." It is a song that would be anathema to the Obama administration, whose fiscal policy is one which espouses living for the present without a thought about tomorrow.

Shame on Republican turncoats

Republicans gave in on the CRomnibus bill, they helped the Federal Communications Commission seize control of the Internet, and now they have assisted President Obama with his illegal-immigrant amnesty bill by funding the Department of Homeland Security. By the way, this defunding would have resulted in only a partial shutdown of Homeland Security, so pushing the measure through to save us all from another shutdown was a lame excuse.

Did Clinton suffer stroke?

While some pundits call Hillary Clinton arrogant and narcissistic for having the temerity while secretary of state to set up a private email account, delete 30,000 "personal" emails and then ask that everyone just "trust" her, I say her actions are a slap in the face of all Americans. With Mrs. Clinton's decadeslong track record of scandal making her one of the least trustworthy persons in the world, how insulting is her request for our faith?

EPA attack on America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The costliest EPA rule yet

A new proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency has already forced four major industrial projects worth $7 billion in new investment in the Baton Rouge area to be put on hold or redirected elsewhere. These potential investments would have collectively contributed $86 million in wages annually to the local economy and created 2,000 jobs.

Illustration on Russian inroads to the Middle East by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Russia flexes its muscle in the Middle East

Russia is in domestic turmoil. The ruble has had a 35 percent drop in value. Population numbers have tumbled from 250 million to 140 million. Life expectancy rates are among the lowest in the world. Alcoholism is rampant. A general state of unease is ubiquitous.

This image made from video provided by NASA shows part of the International Space Station with the Earth in the background on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. (AP Photo/NASA)

The myth of ‘settled science’

National Geographic's latest cover story has generated lots of attention because it sneers at those close-minded Americans — mostly conservatives, of course — who do not accept scientific "facts." Only 40 percent of Americans (according to Pew Research Center) "accept that human activity is the dominant cause of global warming," and the magazine finds it "dispiriting" that so many "reasonable people doubt science."

The pronoun police

Universities are citadels of free thought, places where intellectual inquiry flourishes in an atmosphere of tolerance. Well, that's what they're supposed to be. But many administrators, professors, and, with increasing frequency, students themselves have turned many universities into institutions of indoctrination: Free thinking for me, but not for you.

A Netanyahu-Herzog coalition for Israel

In Israel's election March 17, the two contenders for prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu and Isaac Herzog, have one thing in common: Both are admirers of Winston Churchill.

Revisiting their Waterloo

As Napoleon Bonaparte's troops assembled for battle outside the Belgian village of Waterloo in June 1815, the deposed French emperor spoke scornfully of the opposing British commander and his soldiers: "I tell you that [the Duke of] Wellington is a bad general and the English are bad troops. The whole affair will be no more serious than swallowing one's breakfast!"

Slowing the nuclear clock Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The letter of our discontent

As our republic reels under the Obama administration's lawlessness, it's heartening to see the Republican-led Congress show some backbone — at least in foreign policy. OK, with the glaring exception of illegal immigration.

FILE - This Nov. 11, 2014, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol Building illuminated by the setting sun on the National Mall in Washington. When the leaders of the U.S. Olympic Committee meet Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, they'll be deciding on more than a city to put in the running to host the 2024 Summer Games. They'll be picking a partner that will help shape their near- and long-term future.  Leaders from Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington made their presentations last month and will not be present while the 15 USOC board members debate the pros and cons of each offering at their meeting at Denver International Airport. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Treason in the U.S. Senate

Sometimes public opinion must submit to a history lesson. The famous letter to Iran, signed by 47 senators, urging the mullahs in Tehran to beware of making a deal with President Obama to restrain their pursuit of the Islamic bomb, has got some Democrats in a proper tizzy over the Logan Act. These Democrats don't appear to know any more about the Logan Act than the rest of the anvil chorus, but they want the senators prosecuted for treason. They have collected 165,000 names on a petition to Mr. Obama urging him to prosecute someone.

** FILE ** Former U.N. Ambassador John R. Bolton (Associated Press)

John Bolton back in action, endorsing three 'national security' candidates

- The Washington Times

The man who endorsed 87 "national security" candidates and donated close to $500,000 during the 2014 midterms is back in action. Former United Nations ambassador John Bolton announced Thursday that he was backing Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana in his gubernatorial quest in the state; Rep. Ron DeSantis, the incumbent Congressman from Florida's 6th district, and Dr. Paul Chabot, candidate for Congress in California's 31st district.

A Secret Service officer and Secret Service agents provide security as Marine One carries President Barack Obama off the South Lawn of the White House, on Thursday, March 12, 2015, in Washington. Obama to traveling to Los Angeles for an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live, and a DNC fundraiser. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

No time for ‘boys will be boys’

The days of the Secret Service agent as superhero are long gone. Instead of men like Clint Hill flying into the back seat of the Kennedy motorcade to protect the first lady after the assassination in Dallas, or of the stoic agents of a later time who surrounded Ronald Reagan with their bodies and got him to safety after John Hinckley's failed assassination attempt, the men of today's security detail appear to be rude, raucous, unfocused college frat boys.

Intentional trashing of the Constitution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The president's constitutional end run for Iran

Congress is struggling to thwart President Obama's attempt to strike a nuclear deal with Iran on his own, in violation of the Constitution. Lawmakers are taking unprecedented measures — the invitation to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Corker-Menendez bill, and even a letter to Tehran to stop it. None of this would be necessary if the U.S. Senate had done its job instead of rubber-stamping John Kerry's nomination as secretary of state.