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President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

A large component of the Obama administration's climate-change agenda is to restrict carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. Washington regulators set a goal of reducing CO2 emissions 30 percent by 2030, which would mostly target abundant and affordable coal-fired generation. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Global climate policy after Lima

In his State of the Union address, President Obama again confirmed that “saving the climate” remains one of his top priorities. Yet the recently concluded confab in Lima, Peru, didn’t really conclude anything — certainly no binding protocol to limit emissions of carbon dioxide — but “kicked the can down the road” to the next international gabfest in Paris, scheduled for December.

Illustration on the impact of anti-Semitism on France by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘First they came for the Jews’

A widely distributed political cartoon by Ranan Lurie, published after the massacre of four Jews in a kosher supermarket in Paris, depicts a tiny shrub above ground and just below the surface, supporting the plant, is a web of thick twisted roots spread in the design of the swastika.

If you peered into your neighbor's bedroom with a high-tech device, you'd be prosecuted or sued.  MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY; NO SALES

Who will keep our freedoms safe?

While the Western world was watching and grieving over the slaughter in Paris last week, and my colleagues in the media were fomenting a meaningless debate about whether President Obama should have gone to Paris to participate in a televised parade, the feds took advantage of that diversion to reveal even more incursions into our liberties than we had known about.

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Investing in America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a better America

Warren Buffett became very rich and very famous because he is a terrific investor. Not everyone agrees with his political stances, but his ability to achieve great return on investment is unquestioned.

Paris no-show matches rest of presidency

President Obama's failure last week to make an appearance joining world leaders in solidarity against the terrorist attacks in Paris highlighted six years of failed leadership ("Obama's snub of Paris," Web, Jan. 12). This failure has resulted in the unfettered growth of al Qaeda and Islamic State terrorists throughout the Middle East, Africa and the world, and it puts America and the west at extreme risk.

Rube Goldberg, M.D.

A folk song inspired by Philip Klein's latest book might be called "Shall We Overturn?" Just imagine a Bizarro Pete Seeger croaking out, "Shall we overtuuurn? Shall we overtuuuurn? Shall we overturn Obamacare some day?"

California rightly puts chicken first

Large majorities of both Republican and Democratic California voters passed the new farm animal protection law that just took effect this month, and they were right to do it ("Breaking eggs in California," Web, Jan. 7).

A call to arms, with humor

Mark Steyn's appeal has spread quickly in these early-21st century years. A big hit particularly in the English-speaking world, the author-analyst-humorist is best known in the United States as a frequent substitute on "The Rush Limbaugh Show," America's most popular radio talk show.

George Washington in the Cayman Islands Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The great global lie

Cayman is prosperous, in part, because of a great global lie, which causes many big rich nations to pursue bad economic policies. The global lie is that the developed countries have too little government, rather than too much.

Illustration on France's response to Islamic terrorism by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Is Paris burning?

The late Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times, Paul Conrad, frequently used religious symbols to illustrate his point of view. Conrad drew the ire of some readers whenever he used the Star of David or a cross in his drawings. Letters to the editor denounced him, but to my knowledge no one showed up at the newspaper to kill him.

Associated Press Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Obama's snub of Paris

If Barack Obama has demonstrated one talent in his six years at the White House it's a unique "gift" for shutting his ears to the music of America. The man who says the Muslim call to evening prayer is the sweetest sound in his ears is deaf to the sounds that warm the hearts and stir the souls of the rest of us.

Charlie Hebdo killers hijacked Islam

Last Wednesday's attack at the Paris headquarters of magazine Charlie Hebdo was a cowardly, heinous act which does not have any basis in Islam. As a Muslim woman I find myself repeating over and over that Islam is a religion of peace and terrorists have hijacked my faith.

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park in Alaska, view from Dead Dog Hill. Credit: National Park Service

Paying for the national parks

America's national parks are national treasures, unique in their natural beauty, geological features and recreational opportunities. The parks rescued millions of acres from waste and often thoughtless abuse. Since President Ulysses Grant set aside a federal preservation in 1872, the national park system has evolved to become the envy of other nations.

illustration on the international Islamo-terroist threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Freedom hangs in the balance

Give me liberty or give me death. The pen is mightier than the sword. These are fantastic statements that people and politicians love to make while giving speeches. These words are now dripping with the real blood of innocent cartoonists and jihadi terrorists. Twelve satirists from the French magazine Charlie Hebdo are dead for refusing to bow before the tyranny of fear perpetuated by radical Islamists from across the globe. Summary judgment was carried out by local zealots, the Kouachi brothers, who themselves are now dead at the hands of French police.

Saying no to terror as the new normal

- The Washington Times

As the world continues to reel from the horror of Islamist terrorism in France, one common refrain from commentators and “experts” is that this is now the new normal, that we must be prepared to deal with so-called lone-wolf terrorism for decades.

Thousands of people wave national flags and hold placards that read "I am Charlie" at the Place de la Nation in Paris Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. More than 40 world leaders, their arms linked, marched through Paris Sunday to rally for unity and freedom of expression and to honor 17 victims of three days of terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

An ‘ambassadonor’ shows Obama’s solidarity with France

In yet another example of disrespect to our allies, neither President Obama nor any member of his administration attended Sunday's unity march in Paris. Instead, representing the United States was Obama campaign bundler, Jane Hartley, the newly appointed U. S. ambassador to France.

(AP Photo/Laramie Daily Boomerang, Jeremy Martin)

Portly pastors: Study finds over a third of America's clergy are obese due to stress, long hours

- The Washington Times

Potluck dinners and donuts at the Sunday coffee hour are not to blame. Over a third of America's ministers and clergy are now considered obese because of demanding hours, lower pay and dwindling self care says a new study from Baylor University released Monday. Researchers based their conclusions on the responses of 539 clergy members from multiple denominations and religious traditions - to discover the complex challenges for those with a calling.

The latest cover of Charlie Hebdo.

Doomed to remember more dates in infamy

A headline in London exclaims that what happened in Paris "has galvanized France." Well, that's good, so far as it goes. Galvanized can be a good thing only if the galvanizee stays galvanized. The record is not encouraging.

Terrorists or strict adherents?

In "France weighs the tragic cost of appeasement" (Web, Jan. 8) Claude Salhani writes that the gunmen in last week's murderous Paris attacks "are as far removed from Islam as can possibly be." Mr. Salhani is simply and utterly incorrect.

California Raisins Busted by the USDA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s raisin robbery

The Obama administration is once again championing Uncle Sam's sacred right to seize farmers' harvests. After being trounced on procedural grounds at the Supreme Court in 2013, the Justice Department wants the Supremes to uphold a recent appeals court decision that raisin confiscations are no violation of property rights. However, the Obama administration is misleading the court on whether raisin producers still support the oppressive regime.