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Tax Reform for Economic Growth Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thinking clearly about tax reform

President Trump has said he is going to move on to tax reform after the debacle with Obamacare repeal. Is there any reason that we can expect greater success with the tax reform effort? I argue no, unless the rules in the House and Senate are modified, and those in Congress, whose brains are connected enough to distinguish between tax rates and tax revenues, take control.

President Donald Trump arrives to sign various bills in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Monday, March 27, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Less personality, more policy

In the aftermath of the debacle over the Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, President Trump can learn a valuable lesson that will serve him well in the next battle over tax reform and other issues.

This Thursday, May 12, 2016, file photo, shows a sign outside a restroom at 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Associated Press has determined that North Carolina's law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3 billion in lost business over a dozen years. That's despite Republican assurances that the "bathroom bill" isn't hurting the economy. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Transgenderism’s friendly neighborhood media

- The Washington Times

The Associated Press came out with a cost estimate of how North Carolina’s so-dubbed “bathroom bill” — you know, the one that makes clear that boys must stay in their own restrooms, and girls, likewise — is going to cost the state $3.76 billion over the next dozen or years. What the estimate is based on is the hope and prayer that nobody asks questions. Because under scrutiny, the numbers pretty much crumble.

Illustration on the situation of the Korean peninsula by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Possibilities for reunifying the Korean Peninsula

With North Korea threatening its sixth nuclear test, and the pace of its ballistic-missile tests quickening, Pyongyang’s global threat is ever more imminent. Twenty-five years of self-defeating American efforts to negotiate with the world’s only hereditary Communist dictatorship have, not surprisingly, proven fruitless.

Illustration on Ross Perot's fiscal warnings    The Washington Times

The sagacity of Ross Perot

Exhibit A is the national debt, which reached $20 trillion this year — or $164,000 for every income taxpayer in the country. Because politicians don’t have a plan to address this issue that satisfies most of their constituency, they operate as if it doesn’t exist.

Obamacare Repeal Failure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Botching the Obamacare repeal

As of last week, House Speaker Paul Ryan’s crumbling halfway house — known officially as the American Health Care Act — definitively collapsed.

North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare

In 2015 the Intelligence Community declassified The 1983 Soviet “War Scare” — the definitive report by the president’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board on how and why the USSR nearly launched a preemptive nuclear strike during the NATO theater nuclear exercise ABLE ARCHER-83, held in November 1983.

Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia is looking forward to a resumption of strong and friendly relations with the U.S. following the recent visit of Saudi Deputy Crown Prince bin Salman with President Trump at the White House.

Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes

President Trump and Republicans in Congress have a once in a generation opportunity to dramatically roll back the frontiers of government but will likely fall short because of their lack of candor and finesse.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. The $7 million deal to save jobs at the Carrier factory in Indianapolis is poised for approval by state officials nearly four months after President Donald Trump celebrated his role in the negotiations with a post-election visit to the plant. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

Steering attention left

Meanwhile, here on Earth, mainstream websites, newspapers, TV and radio trash President Trump incessantly. Consumer confidence gallops? New jobs bulge? The stock market soars? Immaterial. The president is teetering, according to reports that so many Americans follow. Just stroll through a recent day’s snippet at Yahoo and you see not one positive angle. Only these:

Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

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A performer dressed as Hefty Smurf gives a high-five to Jack Gall, 13, as John Gall, right, looks on at Children's Hospital in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pa. on March 17, 2017. Actor and Pittsburgh native Joe Manganiello, not pictured, visited patients the hospital with Hefty, the character he voices in "Smurfs: The Lost Village." Manganiello also hosted a screening of the film at the hospital prior to its April 7 nationwide release. Gall's father John is also pictured. (Andrew Rush/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP)

Smile: The U.N. says you must

- The Washington Times

Today is the International Day of Happiness. That's according to the United Nations, which decreed the day back in 2013 and has used all its global might to enforce its provisions on an annual basis since. So go forth and be happy. Dammit.

A music fan waves a Mexican national flag during the performance of Colombian rock ban Doctor Krapula at the 18th annual Vive Latino music festival in Mexico City, Saturday, March 18, 2017. The two-day rock festival is one of the most important and longest running of Mexico. (AP Photo/Christian Palma)

Fearful Mexicans scrap Cinco de Mayo

- The Washington Times

A Cinco de Mayo celebration called El Carnaval de Puebla, held each year in Philadelphia, has just been suddenly canceled -- and in short order, it's due to President Donald Trump. The normal and usual Mexican holiday participants are worried they might get deported -- and this is a good thing.

Illustration on the Trump budget by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Striking budget gold

What hypocrites liberals and the media are. For weeks on end they've been beating up President Trump for not taking the initiative on the $10 trillion debt build-up under Barack Obama or the runaway entitlement programs that could bankrupt our nation.

Illustration on an equitable political solution for Cypress by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey's vision for Cyprus

The Eastern Mediterranean is currently fraught with security challenges. Failed states, mass migration and terrorism afflict the region. Amid this turmoil, however, a golden opportunity exists to resolve one issue that has eluded a lasting settlement for decades. I am referring to the island of Cyprus. My government's vision for its future involves transforming the island into a bastion of peace, stability, cooperation and economic prosperity.

San Francisco Withdraws from the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

San Francisco beyond sanctuary

For one big reason San Francisco stands out among the 500 cities that have declared themselves sanctuaries for illegal aliens. Others content themselves by refusing to cooperate with federal immigration enforcement agencies. About a month ago San Francisco took a big step farther by withdrawing its police from cooperation with the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF).

Judge Gorsuch and the corpse flower

- The Washington Times

Every few years, the botanical garden down on the National Mall proudly boasts its prized "corpse flower." In years when our federal swamp gets hot and icky enough, the foul-smelling plant turns a throbbing purple and blooms.

"Trumpcare" needs fixing

Republicans in support of "Trumpcare" are walking on thin ice. Democrats despise the bill (no surprise there) but even Republicans, the party of the bill's origin, differ in opinion. As a member of the latter group, I say, Back to the drawing board.

President Donald Trump talks to the press corps inside Air Force One at the Palm Beach International Airport, Sunday, March 19, 2017, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Trump is returning to Washington. Standing next to Trump  is New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Trump's left hand

Some of the Democrats trying to come to terms with their new home in the wilderness have chosen Ivanka, the president's accomplished daughter, as their "lifeline" to the past. They see her as the only vestige of light in an otherwise dark, alt-right Trump administration. The London Guardian says she's a "moral compass" for her father, who "might be able to rein in some of the more extreme policies of the administration."

The Pentagon pushed back against reports that an aggressive string of recent U.S. military sorties have killed hundreds of civilians in Iraq and Syria. Defense Secretary James Mattis reportedly has been weighing a loosening of restrictions on U.S. airstrikes that the Obama administration kept in place in war against the Islamic State in Iraq, current and former U.S. officials have said. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

A job for the mad dog

When James Mattis, the retired Marine general once called "Mad Dog Mattis" by his troops for his no-nonsense combat leadership, was named secretary of Defense many senior officers were encouraged to think that at last someone would put his foot down, hard, on the use of the military as a petri dish for the social experiments so beloved by Barack Obama and Ashton Carter.

This undated image provided by the U.S. Marine Corps shows a billboard that the Corps will post as part of a new recruitment advertisement campaign, meant to draw millennials by showing Marines as not only strong warriors but good citizens. "Battles Won" is the name of the campaign that includes TV ads and online clips of Marines unloading "Toys for Tots" boxes and real video of a Marine veteran tackling an armed robber. The military's smallest branch is also considering replacing its iconic slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." (U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

Marines, sadly, go soft for snowflakes

- The Washington Times

Marines, long regarded the tough guy fighting force of the United States -- the branch above politically correct reproach, the one able to withstand the progressive onslaughts that have permeated America's military in recent years -- have a new, tailor-made message for millennials. And it's a bit on the softy side.

In this Jan. 5, 2017, photo, a painting by David Pulphus hangs in a hallway displaying paintings by high school students selected by their member of congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. A GOP congressman reported Jan. 13 that a painting stirring controversy on Capitol Hill will be taken down on Tuesday as a result of a review by the agency responsible for maintaining the Capitol complex determined it violated rules for a student arts competition. The painting depicts Ferguson, Missouri, with the image of a pig in a police uniform aiming a gun at a protester. The painting was among hundreds completed by high school students that are featured in a tunnel leading to the Capitol. (AP Photo/Zach Gibson)

Anti-police 'pig' art must go -- and stay gone

- The Washington Times

A federal judge is poised to issue a ruling any day now about the fate of a controversial piece of art in the U.S. Capitol that shows a policeman as a pig -- and the fact that this even has to go to court shows not just the power, but the utter ridiculousness, of the progressive movement in America, circa 2017. Congress should not be in the business of promoting the idea that police are pigs.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., a vociferous opponent of the House Republican healthcare reform plan, referring to it as "Obamacare light," discusses the bill before a TV interview on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March, 15, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Civil asset forfeiture reform rears again -- thank goodness

- The Washington Times

Sen. Rand Paul and Rep. Tim Walberg, both Republicans, have re-introduced one of the most important pieces of legislation to come forward in decades that will secure the rights of Americans to be safe in their possessions and properties -- a rollback to civil asset forfeiture laws. Speedy passage is needed.

From left, Marina Aleixo tends to the children's table as Diana Otongo, Umar Choudry and Jonas Mphiri serve themselves a meal of rice, salmon and beef stroganoff inside Aleixo and Choudry's Minneapolis home on March 5, 2017. Immigrants themselves, Aleixo and Choudry are inviting immigrant and refugee families to dinner at their home more frequently. "These kind of initiatives can help us gain a better understanding of each other," Aleixo said.   (Evan Frost/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)

Gag me with the media spin on falling food stamps

- The Washington Times

And leftists say there's no such thing as a left-leaning media -- that media bias is all in conservatives' heads. Well, look at this headline, from The Washington Post, about the drop in numbers of illegals applying for food stamp benefits: "Immigrants are going hungry so Trump won't deport them."