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Chicken Little

Nobody does hysteria like the media

- The Washington Times

Chicken Little will have company when the sky falls on the British isles and the world ends, which the European Union, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the BBC, CBS, NBC, ABC and Barack Obama can now say with confidence will be at 2:20 in the morning next Thursday (just in time for the late final editions).

Illustration on U.S. job opportunities and economic stagnation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Brexit’ strikes back at the elites

Last week, Britain voted to leave the European Union, freeing itself from international governance. Just as the United States would recoil at the thought of Canadians making laws that trump U.S. governance were that a provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Britain is evidently fed up with ceding its sovereignty to unelected bureaucrats in Brussels as part of its international agreements.

In this photo taken, March 17, 2016, people rally in front of the San Luis Obispo County government building in support of Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in San Luis Obispo, Calif. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and environmental groups said Tuesday, June 21, 2016, that they've reached an agreement that will close the Diablo Canyon plant, California's last nuclear power plant, by 2025. (David Middlecamp/The Tribune (of San Luis Obispo) via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

How ‘greens’ add to greenhouse gases

Listening to environmentalists talk about the threat of climate change is like hearing some lost passage of the Book of Revelation with predictions of flooded cities, wildfires, hurricanes, failing crops and swarms of disease-bearing mosquitoes.

Illustration on America's military strength versus tyranny by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The enduring strength of America

As we soon pause to celebrate the anniversary of our nation’s independence, it seems appropriate to consider the vital role played by the American military in the creation of our nation and its transformation of our world.

Illustration on the Brexit vote. (Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times)

What the British revolt signals

Oh what a difference a break makes. On Thursday, our English cousins across the pond voted to leave the European Union. For some reason, they had enough of unelected bureaucrats issuing rules and regulations ruining their lives and throwing the future in the dustbin.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's economic plans by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary pleads for four more years

“People are working harder and longer just to keep their heads above water. And to deal with the costs, the everyday costs, the costs of basics like childcare and prescription drugs that are too high. College is getting more expensive every day. And wages are still too low and inequality is too great. Good jobs in this country are still too hard to come by.”

Illustration on Chinese drugs coming through Mexico by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Drugs and thugs

On June 9, The New York Times ran this headline on Page A1: “Drug That Killed Prince Is Making Mexican Cartels Richer, U.S. Says.” The first line of the story reads, “The drug that killed Prince has become a favorite of Mexican cartels because it is extremely potent, popular in the United States — and immensely profitable, American officials say.”

Eco-Terrorism Damage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Greenpeace under fire

Governments and courts around the world are finally cracking down on the eco-terrorist organization Greenpeace. The crackdown, which is long overdue, couldn’t happen to a more misguided bunch of people.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The bad moon rising over Hillary

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton won’t be able to say she didn’t see the bad moon rising. Donald Trump gave her a blistering introduction this week to Presidential Politics 102, which differs in a remarkable way from Politics 101, which she encountered in her first attempt in 2008 and before that as the managing partner in Bubba’s two campaigns.

Illustration on the Obama administration's plans for the fossil fuel industry by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Why Exxon is not the problem

For more than 200 years, the American birthright has provided protection against the threat that one’s head might hang on London Bridge — or the Key Bridge, if you prefer — for disagreeing with the government.

Illustration on the struggle for Kurdish independence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Kurdish independence matters

If the next U.S. president wants “to put America first” he might look toward the Kurdish north of Iraq. There the long-standing question of Kurdish independence scares Washington into a tired reflex that quashes important U.S. interests beneath an unwavering policy to promote the fiction of a unified Iraq.

Illustration on the Republican alternative to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ryan’s Obamacare liberation

Paul Ryan’s House Republican Task Force on health policy reform released on Wednesday the Republican majority’s unified plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans should not be shy about making this reform the centerpiece of this year’s election.

Illustration on the dangers of Obama, the ideologue by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ideologues make for dangerous politicians

Hillary Clinton is a seasoned liberal politician, but one with few core beliefs. Her positions on subjects such as gay marriage, free-trade agreements, the Keystone XL pipeline, the Iraq War, the Assad regime in Syria and the use of the term “radical Islam” all seem to hinge on what she perceives 51 percent of the public to believe on any given day.

Related Articles

Illustration on Obama's ineffectiveness opposing radical Islamic terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Obama's failed leadership is literally killing us

- The Washington Times

The most recent Islamic act of war, in which self-professed Islamic State jihadi Omar Mir Seddique Mateen slaughtered 49 people and injured scores of others at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., should be a game changer. The deadliest attack on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001, should finally convince our leadership that dealing with the Islamic threat must no longer be business as usual.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Before the Fall'

This is the story of what happens before a private plane full of rich passengers plunges out of the sky into the ocean. It sounds like a basic air disaster but it isn't. It is stunningly simple and stunningly clever.

Dangerous Travel to Brazil Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stopping the spread of Zika

Avoid all nonessential travel to countries with endemic Zika. That was the key message from scientific experts at a hearing the House Science, Space and Technology Committee held on May 25.

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton shares a laugh with retired Adm. James Barnett, right, during a panel discussion on national security, Wednesday, June 15, 2016, at the Virginia Air and Space Museum in Hampton, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Endorsing lawlessness

Surprise, surprise: President Obama endorsed Hillary Clinton for president. He wants someone to follow him who will protect his disastrous legacy. He couldn't have made a better choice.

Funding our own demise?

Our country has become a host for parasites from all over the world. They come here and feed off our social support network; more than 68 percent of those from Muslim countries in violent conflict are on cash welfare. Many others are recipients of EBT food cards, housing support and public education, and have neither marketable skills nor an interest in becoming Americans.

Protestors call for a $15-an-hour minimum wage as McDonald's shareholders meet at the company's corporate headquarters, Thursday, May 21, 2015, in Oak Brook, Ill.  (Chuck Berman/Chicago Tribune via AP)

The $15 menu

The "dollar menu" at McDonald's has vanished, but there's a new $15 menu. It's called the government-mandated minimum wage. In a sagging economy, overpaid and underseasoned McJobs are attracting the best and the brightest straight out of the likes of Harvard, Yale and Stanford.

Saudi Arabian Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman listens in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, during a meeting between Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef and President Barack Obama, in this May 13, 2015, file photo. Saudi Arabia said Tuesday, Dec. 15, that 34 nations have agreed to form a new "Islamic military alliance" to fight terrorism with a joint operations center based in the kingdom's capital, Riyadh. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Revolution in the desert

Forever is a long time, but it doesn't last forever, not even in the Middle East. The Saudis are taking the first baby stops to overhaul their notoriously autocratic regime.

Trump the anti-Obama

Donald Trump is catching flak from liberal media types because he recently had the audacity to question President Obama's handling of the Orlando massacre. Mr. Obama still refuses to label that heinous act radical Islamic terrorism.

FBI agents return to the scene of the mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., Tuesday, June 14, 2016.   (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

FBI under the gun

The Orlando massacre by a homegrown American Muslim who wanted to die a martyr for al Qaeda raises a host of deeply disturbing questions about keeping America safe.

50 origami birds made by Samantha Brouwer and Gabrielle Grace sit around a rainbow flag during a vigil honoring the Orlando shooting victims hosted by the Kalamazoo Gay Lesbian Resource Center in Kalamazoo, Mich. on Monday, June 13, 2016. A gunman has killed dozens of people in a massacre at a crowded gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla. on Sunday, making it the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.  (Chelsea Purgahn/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL RADIO OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

Preventing another Orlando

The Boston Marathon, San Bernardino, and now Orlando -- it goes on and on, as Donald Trump might say. And it is going to continue to get worse, as Mr. Trump already has said. He is the most prescient campaigner in this race for the presidency.

Illustration on the BDS movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Terrorism and economic warfare

Tel Aviv's Sarona Market bills itself as the "heartbeat of Israeli culinary art." Dozens of small restaurants and shops offer cheese, wine, bread, fish, olives, pasta, burgers -- pretty much anything you can imagine and quite a bit that you probably cannot.

Illustration on U.S./Russian cooperation in containing China by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A revitalized U.S.-Russian relationship

Washington seems newly determined to contain China in Asia, but its recent policies -- displays of military might in the South China Sea and overtures to Hanoi -- clearly underscore its tougher stance.

Trump Economy Would Beat Hillary's Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's superior plans on the economy

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton offer Americans a clear choice on the economy. On international trade, taxes and business regulation, he advocates radically different strategies to fire up growth, whereas she would build on President Obama's agenda.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Washington's Immortals: The Untold Story of an Elite Regiment'

As a military historian, Patrick O'Donnell has a passion for walking through battlefields. In 2010, he found himself in a scruffy area of Brooklyn -- auto repair shops, warehouses and the like -- that was the site of one of the first engagements of the Revolutionary summer of 1776.