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George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The party’s over and no place to call home

- The Washington Times

That’s the dilemma of the Democrats, forlorn, despondent and walking in circles like the goose hit on the head with a long-handled wooden spoon. They’re asking questions for which there are no happy answers in the wake of their fourth straight loss in a round of special elections.

Illustration of Anne Morgan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Anne Morgan, an American Hero

The United States was finally in “the war to end all wars.” France had been ravaged since the summer of 1914. Villages and towns were obliterated. Women and children went hungry and homeless as the armies wrestled in futile combat in mud, blood and indescribable filth and disease. The British lost 20,000 dead in a single day at the Battle of the Somme.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn’t your insurance talking. It’s doctoring. It’s nursing. It’s medical technology. It’s your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can’t prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn’t do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.

Illustration on the devaluation of U.S. bonds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uncle Sam’s F-rated bonds

Were the United States any other country, its bonds would have long ago been downgraded to junk.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times

The thing people like about House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is that he is a serious guy who is capable of thinking big and has an ambitious agenda to salvage our ungovernable federal bureaucracy.

Photojournalist Shay Horse said he was pepper-sprayed while covering protests at the Jan. 21 presidential inauguration, even though his camera identified him as a journalist. (Sarah Nelson / The Washington Times)

Is ACLU lawsuit against D.C. cops a red herring?

- The Washington Times

“An officer told us to drop our pants,” Shay Horse said. “An officer went down the row telling each of us not to flinch as he grabbed our balls and yanked on them, and then stuck his finger up each of our anuses and wiggled it around. I felt like they were using molestation and rape as punishment.”

Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Trump and his generals

Donald Trump earned respect from the Washington establishment for appointing three of the nation’s most accomplished generals to direct his national security policy: James Mattis (secretary of defense), H.R. McMaster (national security adviser) and John Kelly (secretary of homeland security).

Sponsor of Terror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Qatar threatens peace

Qatar, a small oil- and gas-rich nation in the Arabian Peninsula, has been boycotted by its neighbors, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt. Other nations, including Libya, Maldives, Mauritania, Jordan, Djibouti and Senegal, also have commenced severe diplomatic measures against Qatar.

Illustration of American consul Raymond Geist              The Washington Times

A disingenuous handling of the Jewish refugee issue in ‘Genius’

Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time. His contributions to physics revolutionized our understanding of the universe. The current television series based on his life is appropriately titled “Genius.” But did he also help facilitate a mass rescue of Jews from Germany?

In this file photo taken Aug. 31, 2015, a cow grazes at Hickory Hill Milk in Edgefield, S.C. (Susan Ardis/The State via AP)

The fallacy of ‘unhealthy competition’

Just when you thought liberals were focusing only on destroying our government, there is now ample evidence that fellow travelers have been working diligently to destroy the ideas and dreams of our young people.

Related Articles

Comey's coup

The malice aforethought and intent evident in former FBI Director James Comey's Senate testimony last week make it crystal-clear that Mr. Comey was actively working for and planning a soft coup from his very first meeting with President Trump. No other conclusion can be drawn from Mr. Comey's immediate efforts to interrupt his and the president's conversations.

President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, June 14, 2017, about the shooting in Alexandria, Va. where House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., and others, where shot during a Congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A shooting war on Republicans

The only person responsible for shooting up a congressional baseball practice Wednesday in Alexandria, wounding a Republican congressman and several aides, is James Thomas Hodgkinson, 66, of Belleville, Ill. He died of a gunshot wound, but it was brought on by the rage in Democratic ranks of Trump Derangement Syndrome.

In this May 21, 2017, file photo provided by The Public Theater, Tina Benko, left, portrays Melania Trump in the role of Caesar's wife, Calpurnia, and Gregg Henry, center left, portrays President Donald Trump in the role of Julius Caesar during a dress rehearsal of The Public Theater's Free Shakespeare in the Park production of Julius Caesar in New York. Teagle F. Bougere, center right, plays as Casca, and Elizabeth Marvel, right, as Marc Anthony. Delta Air Lines is pulling its sponsorship of New York's Public Theater for portraying Julius Caesar as the Donald Trump look-alike in a business suit who gets knifed to death on stage, according to its statement Sunday, June 11, 2017. (Joan Marcus/The Public Theater via AP)

The high price of free speech

The First Amendment is the most precious of all the rights enumerated in the Constitution, and it's a pity that Americans actually know so little about it. The First Amendment guarantees the right of Americans to say whatever they please, even the ugly and the irresponsible, but it does not guarantee there won't be a price to pay for saying certain things.

A photo of James Hodgkinson from his JTH Inspections business webpage.

James Hodgkinson, Scalise shooting suspect: 'Time to Destroy Trump & Co.'

- The Washington Times

James T. Hodgkinson, the 66-year-old man who was taken into custody by police for the shooting at the Alexandria baseball field where Republicans practiced -- and where House Minority Whip Steve Scalise was hit by gunfire and injured -- was an Illinois resident who hates President Donald Trump and loves socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders. President Trump said the suspect has since died.

In this May 17, 2017, photo, Majority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., speaks with the media on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Steve Scalise shooting smells of partisan hit on GOP

- The Washington Times

Republican Whip Steve Scalise was shot during a charity baseball practice in Alexandria, along with two Capitol Hill police and reportedly, an aide. And moments before the shooting started, a man by the field asked Rep. Ron DeSantis, Florida Republican, if those practicing were Republicans or Democrats. Coincidence?

In this photo taken Dec. 21, 2016, the Trump International Hotel in Washington. A Pennsylvania man has been arrested at the Trump International Hotel in Washington after police say they found a rifle and handgun in his car. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Democrats -- 196 of them -- join to sue Trump on emoluments

- The Washington Times

Almost 200 Democrats in Congress have joined forced to announce they're filing a lawsuit against President Donald Trump over allegations he unlawfully profited from overseas governments. It's a play to see his tax returns under guise of the emoluments clause of the Constitution.

President Donald Trump smiles as he walks with his daughter Ivanka Trump across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017, before boarding Marine One helicopter for the trip to nearby Andrews Air Force Base. They are traveling to Milwaukee, to meet with people dealing with health care issues. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump and the liberal hate-fest

Almost six out of 10 American voters are angry and dissatisfied with how the media is covering politics, according to a new Quinnipiac poll. Someone has finally united us, and it's through rejection of the 24/7 media (read liberal) hate-fest of President Trump.

Illustration of James Comey by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

James Comey, the crack-up

I shall not beat around the bush. As readers of this column perhaps suspect, I have admired former FBI Director James Comey for most of his public career, beginning in 2013. That he is a friend of former FBI Director Robert Mueller makes me admire him even more. Mr. Mueller is a man of integrity and discretion. Mr. Mueller would not befriend a man of dubious character.

Illustration on Qatar's funding of terrorism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Qatar ultimatum

In the aftermath of the terrorist atrocities of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush drew a line in the sand. "Every nation, in every region, now has a decision to make," he announced. "Either you are with us or you are with the terrorists." Since then, disappointingly if not surprisingly, more than a few nations have straddled that line, providing support to America and America's enemies alike.

Trump's Qatar moment

As the United States looks for ways to de-escalate the growing and dangerous dispute between Qatar and its neighbors Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), two fundamental points have to inform the Trump foreign policy team.

President Donald Trump listens as his daughter, Ivanka Trump, speaks at a workforce development roundtable at Waukesha County Technical College in Pewaukee, Wis., Tuesday, June 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Trump's Middle East doctrine

President Trump's historic visit last month to Saudi Arabia, where he met with the heads of more than 50 mostly Sunni heads of state, dramatically marked the end of eight years of Barack Obama's appeasement of Iran. It signaled to all the Muslim leaders that the United States as the "strong horse" is back. There was no doubt in any of the Muslim leaders' minds that Mr. Trump is a man of action and a leader who will keep his word.

Detail of a 1917 Flag Day poster

Flag Day, 1917 like no other

"Never had there been such a Flag Day fete before, and it may be centuries before it occurs again, but the deed was accomplished, despite the setting. The President had spoken."

States Coming Apart Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Falling apart

On June 1, President Trump announced that the United States was withdrawing from the Paris Climate Agreement. His action drew predictable condemnation from our allies in the developed world.

Screwy Wedding Cake Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Closing time for the Episcopalians

The Episcopal Church must take immortality seriously. How else explain the amazing things it does that will certainly hasten its demise?

Kick anti-U.S. moochers off payroll

The culture war in America just gets worse by the day. That we have in government positions people such as Sen. Bernie Sanders, Vermont Democrat, and Patrick McCarthy, associate dean for library and information access at San Diego State University, is outrageous and unconstitutional. That these people foment a religious or political test for American citizens is outrageous and unconstitutional.