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Demonstrators sharing opposing views argue during a rally Thursday, April 27, 2017, in Berkeley, Calif. Demonstrators gathered near the University of California, Berkeley campus amid a strong police presence and rallied to show support for free speech and condemn the views of Ann Coulter and her supporters. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Spooked by the power of words, words, words

- The Washington Times

The only thing anyone is allowed to hear on campus is a slogan. Thinking is so 20th century (and early 20th century at that). The adults paid to be in charge have retreated to a safe place, where never is heard an encouraging word and the skies are cloudy all day.

Illustration on fixing the net neutrality law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Controlling the nation’s internet

Do you remember the last time you had an issue with your internet connection and the federal government cheerfully helped you resolve it? Me neither. Yet the same federal government who spent $2 billion on a website that was more likely to dish out electric shocks than work properly is now literally in control of our nation’s internet, under the false rubric of promoting “net neutrality.”

Immoral Illegal Drugs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why buying illegal drugs is immoral

Purchasing illegal drugs is an immoral act, regardless of where one stands in the legalization debate. When drugs are legally prohibited, criminal organizations assume control of production and distribution, making violence inherent in the process. Drug proceeds are used to fund criminal and terrorist organizations, enabling them to murder innocent people, attack police and military, bleed our tax dollars, and destroy the rule of law.

Illustration on gun control debate by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Challenging inaccurate information about guns

When you receive glowing media attention and have hundreds of millions of dollars to spend, you don’t really have to debate. Michael Bloomberg just announced last week that he would be putting $25 million into next year’s House and Senate races. From 2013 to 2016, he donated $48 million toward congressional races. By contrast, the NRA contributed a measly $2.1 million. And Mr. Bloomberg spent about 85 percent more on lobbying, more on television advertising, and much more for state and local political races.

Illustration on the Clinton campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Hillary doomed her ‘inevitable presidency’

While we’re examining the accomplishments of Donald Trump’s first 100 days — putting his man on the U.S. Supreme Court is the biggie — Hillary Clinton is getting the once-over (and the second and third) for all the reasons why she’s not the first woman to preside over her own first 100 days in the Oval Office.

Illustration on the Trump White House decision to broaden media access by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Talking right

President Trump did something Monday I have long advocated. He met with a small group of conservative journalists, pundits and radio talk show hosts. I was among them.

This May 23, 2016, file photo, shows the northernmost boundary of the proposed Bears Ears region, along the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah. Western Democrats are pressuring President Donald Trump not to rescind land protections put in place by President Barack Obama, including Utah's Bears Ears National Monument. Obama infuriated Utah Republicans when he created the monument on 1.3 million acres of land that is sacred to Native Americans. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)

Go, Trump, go — pare back the national monuments

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is taking aim at some of Barack Obama’s national monuments, as well as at designations made by other presidents. And this is great news. Terrific news. When it comes to the country’s national monuments, this White House’s attitude should be one of slash and burn — not conserve and preserve.

Illustration on the dangerous complications of the Obama/Iran nuke deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tangled in Obama’s Iran nuclear trap

On April 18, the State Department certified Iran to be in compliance with its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA). As France’s iconic foreign minister, the Marquis de Talleyrand, once reportedly said: “This was worse than a crime; it was a mistake.”

Illustration on the sources of Trump's ideas by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The anatomy of a Trump decision

When Donald Trump’s Florida lawyer Paul Rampell first proposed turning the future president’s Mar-a-Lago estate into a private club, Mr. Trump pronounced the idea “dumb.” Over the next month, Messrs. Rampell and Trump argued back and forth about the idea until Mr. Trump finally agreed with Mr. Rampell.

DAY 40 - In this Feb. 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., gestures on Capitol Hill in Washington, before his address to a joint session of Congress. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, file)

Ending the threats of a government shutdown

We are looking at another potential federal government shutdown this week. The high drama over passing a budget, passing spending bills under regular order, and the lifting of the debt ceiling has gone on for far too many years.

Illustration on a possible replay of 1927 for the Democrat party in 2020 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Will 2020 be another 1972 for Democrats?

The year 1968 was a tumultuous one that saw the assassinations of rival candidate Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. Lyndon Johnson’s unpopular lame-duck Democratic administration imploded due to massive protests against the Vietnam War.

Democrats can’t chart their way forward in this wilderness

Like most minority parties that lose the White House, the Democratic Party is without a national leader. Their legislative caucuses in the House and Senate have elected leadership, but the party itself has several elected officials fighting to lead it into the future, all with an eye toward 2020. And the party’s most visible figures aren’t exactly fresh faces.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gives an acceptance speech after accepting the Trailblazer Award during the LGBT Community Center Dinner at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen) ** FILE **

The Democratic Party’s ‘Gong Show’

Finally, the Democrats admit it wasn’t the Russians, James B. Comey or sexism that brought Hillary Clinton down. We are now told by journalists, leading Democrats, and even a former Democratic presidential candidate, that it was the inept dysfunction of the party itself, Hillary, and her abused and frightened team that has reduced them all to irrelevant, vapid political busybodies.

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Eddis Marie Loving, of East Chicago, Ind., holds a sign as supporters and residents of East Chicago, Ind., rally near a public-housing complex Wednesday, April 19, 2017, ahead of a visit by Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt. Pruitt was scheduled to to tour the complex where roughly 1,000 people were ordered evacuated because of lead contamination. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)

It's Earth Day, not Doomsday

Saturday marks the annual celebration of nature called Earth Day, now in its 47th year. It's further the day set aside for a new event, the March for Science. Which to support? Well, both. The environmentally conscious in the nation's capital can kill two birds with one stone (speaking figuratively, of course) and do both. By showing up on the National Mall, they can refresh their love for humanity's habitat and cheer as well for the scientific programs that guard against abusing the globe. But showing up in a "Make America Great Again" hat won't be wise. Someone burdened with an excess of tolerance might deck such a foolish celebrant with a picket sign. Saturday is not about making America great, but making America green.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders acknowledges the crowd following his speech at the Louisville Palace, Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. Sanders told a boisterous crowd Tuesday night in Louisville that Trump has reneged on his promises to working-class voters. He said Democrats should reach out to disillusioned Trump supporters as the out-of-power party tries to recover from last year's election losses. (Sam Upshaw Jr./The Courier-Journal via AP)

Another 'moral victory' for the Democrats

Our earthquakes and landslides just ain't what they used to be. The Democrats, like all political parties on the outs with voters, are entitled to look for hope and solace where they can find it, but the pickings in special congressional elections are so far pretty skimpy.

True Islam teaches equality

In her recent anti-Islam diatribe masquerading as a legitimate condemnation of female genital mutilation (FGM) ("The Islam clash in America," Web, April 18) Cheryl K. Chumley makes some ill-informed, inaccurate and offensive statements about Islam and Muslims.

FILE - In this Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, file photo, New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez puts on a Super Bowl cap following the AFC Championship NFL football game against the Baltimore Ravens in Foxborough, Mass. Hernandez, who was serving a life sentence for a murder conviction and just days ago was acquitted of a double murder, died after hanging himself in his prison cell Wednesday, April 19, 2017, Massachusetts prisons officials said. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson, File)

Aaron Hernandez, a tragedy of wasted talent

- The Washington Times

Aaron Hernandez, of former NFL fame, killed himself in prison, the Department of Correction reported. The former New England Patriots tight end was found hanging from a bed sheet attached to his single-cell window in his Souza Baranowski Correctional Center in Shirley, Mass., shortly after 3 a.m. What a tragedy. A tragic end to a life that had become a tragedy.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson interviews Drexel University professor George Ciccariello on March 30, 2017. (Fox News screenshot)

The rot of political correctness

In today's academy, truth is an invention. Expecting people to show up on time is racist. Censorship is good. Silencing opposing viewpoints imperative. Violence to enforce safety is natural.

Preserving employee wellness programs

From the start of the new Congress and new administration, reining in the regulatory state has been a leading priority -- and for good reason.

Fiscally Irresponsible in Puerto Rico Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping Puerto Rico honest

Congress wisely declined to bail out Puerto Rico when its leaders turned to Washington with hat in hand for help with its $70 billion debt. Instead, they created an oversight board to compel the island commonwealth to solve its self-inflicted fiscal mess.

Arming the Terrorists Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redefining the battle against terrorists

One of the hallmarks of the 2016 presidential campaign was Donald Trump's insistence on being honest about the threat of "radical Islamic terrorism." It's a phrase that President Obama refused to speak, preferring the euphemism "violent extremism." Hillary Clinton muttered the taboo expression half-heartedly only after Mr. Trump shamed her into it.

North Korean Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The coming war with North Korea

It appears to be accepted that North Korea will have an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capability with a suitably miniaturized warhead in the next three to four years, along with the capacity to deliver that weapon to the West Coast of the United States.

Illustration on the proposed Eisenhower Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saving the Eisenhower Memorial

There is hope. I am speaking of the envisioned memorial to Dwight D. Eisenhower here in Washington, D.C. Admittedly, its design by the crank architect Frank Gehry has been pretty much accepted by the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission, and the chairman of the House committee that has control of the funding, Rep. Ken Calvert, seems to be going along.

China's Margaret Chan, General Director of the World Health Organization, WHO, makes closing remarks during a panel on Neglected Tropical Diseases for the celebration of the fifth anniversary of the London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs), in Geneva, Switzerland, on Tuesday, April 18, 2017. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)

Making sense of disease risk

I need a full arsenal of medical screening tools at my disposal to help my patients. Some of the tools I have are new, and others have been around a long time. They help me assess the risk of getting a disease, or in the case of a colonoscopy or a cardiac stress test, of already having one.

Illustration on Erdogan's impact on Turkey by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The end of Turkey's democratic experiment

On the grounds of the Turkish Embassy facing Massachusetts Ave. in Washington, D.C. is a statue of Mustafa Kamal Ataturk, father of the Republic of Turkey, the nation-state he built from the rubble of the defeated Ottoman Empire and Islamic caliphate.

A political porcupine

Good biography should not just bring the subject individual into clearer focus, it also should inform us about how that life has something to tell us about current events. This meticulously annotated selection from the diaries of our sixth president reads like the banner headlines of today's news reports of political intrigue, raw ambitions and the same existential crisis that divides our nation today.

Give states back their land

In his otherwise excellent article on federal land grabs ("A monumental issue in Maine," B3, April 17), Robert Knight fails to mention why Washington is able to get away with this.

How to sway North Korea

President Trump has pointed out the strong linkage between China and North Korea, and he correctly assumes China can influence North Korea's weapons-development program. We must work with China to resolve this situation, the Chinese encroachment in the South China Sea and the trade-deficit imbalance.

'Snowflake' schools prepare no one

How ironic was The Washington Times' juxtaposition of two articles in yesterday's edition ("The Halls of Ivy," Inside the Beltway; "Trump to Use Executive Order to Push 'Hire American,'"). Maybe when universities like Arizona State start offering, teaching and testing students on courses that actually prepare them for a future in the work world instead of wasting parents' and taxpayers' money on country-club living with a side helping of "snowflake" protection, perhaps then the H-1B visa program will become extinct. If I were the CEO of a company looking to hire people with the skill sets needed to improve my business, these students would be at the bottom of my list.