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Former US President Barack Obama is awarded the German Media Prize 2016 in Baden-Baden, Germany, Thursday, May 25, 2017.(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Cutting Taxes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A rare chance to boost small businesses

Among the many lessons our current leadership should learn from Ronald Reagan’s effective governance are his initiatives to revitalize the American economy. Most relevant today is remembering President Reagan’s tax cuts and corporate tax reform of 1986 enacted with bipartisan support that produced sustained economic growth.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a sword and sways with traditional dancers during a welcome ceremony at Murabba Palace, in Riyadh. Trump and his entourage were treated to a traditional all-male Saudi sword dance. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the Saudi king, Trump swayed side to side and briefly joined the groove. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump’s vision for the Middle East

President Trump arrived in the Arabian desert hoping to realign the politics of the Middle East in the aftermath of a failed Obama policy. For eight years, President Obama tilted in the direction of Iran, believing that the influence of the Shia could balance Sunni dominance.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security’s Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

Related Articles

President Donald Trump walks across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 17, 2017, following his short trip on Marine One from nearby Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump was returning to Washington after speaking at today's U.S. Coast Guard Academy Commencement Ceremony. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The anonymous 'heroes' of the Resistance

Anonymous sources may not always be reliable, but they're always convenient. More than that, anonymous accounts are usually made of putty, soft and easily shaped. Not only that, an anonymous source never claims he was misquoted. He never demands a correction or a retraction. The Washington Post, which deals in anonymous sources for many of its blockbuster disclosures, is particularly skilled at working with anonymous sources, and gets more out of them than almost any other newspaper.

Demonstrators hold candles during a vigil for the victims of the clashes with the government's security forces, during protest against President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Several humanitarian organizations and the opposition have accused the security forces of using too much violence during demonstrations against the government, which have left dozens dead.(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

The deadly peril in Venezuela

If Venezuela burns, the United States will feel the heat. Like a nearby brush fire, the Venezuelan civil war threatens to erupt in a conflagration that will disrupt life throughout the hemisphere. Americans are accustomed to watching tinderboxes from half a world away, but this one is too close for comfort.

James B. Comey's firing will have immediate and long-term ramifications. (Associated Press)

As questions mount, the White House could use a few good answers

President Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James B. Comey has set in motion a series of events that present the most serious threat to his presidency yet. We can all speculate where we would be had Mr. Trump not decided to dismiss the FBI director, but the simple fact is that the White House has lost the ability to control where this story goes from here.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. listens to a reporter's question before a policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

John McCain wildly proclaims 'Watergate' at Trump's door

- The Washington Times

Sen. John McCain, self-proclaimed Republican but not-so-secret Democrat, came out in full force against his own party's president, saying the many scandals rocking the White House lately are reaching "Watergate" proportions. Easy there, McCain. Let's reel back the rhetoric a bit and consider a more level-headed look at these so-called scandals.

In this Oct. 14, 2014, file photo, Kimberly Guilfoyle arrives at the New York special screening of "Fury," in New York. Fox News host Guilfoyle said in a Monday, May 15, 2017, interview with the Mercury News in San Jose, Calif., that she is in conversations with the Trump administration about replacing Sean Spicer as White House press secretary. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

Kimberly Guilfoyle would be great

- The Washington Times

Fox News host, attorney and all-around blunt talker Kimberly Guilfoyle has been making the media rounds of late, suggesting personal interest in replacing Sean Spicer as White House press secretary. This would be a great move for the White House -- for President Donald Trump's defense team.

Illustration on the need for a U.S. revamp of it's nuclear missile capability in a changed world by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Revamping America's nuclear posture

The nuclear weapons world has just changed for the fourth time. We're in a new world, and new policies and actions are required.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's claim that Russian interference led to her defeat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Russians have come

While contemplating the Democrats' agitated preoccupation with the Russians' intrusion into our 2016 presidential election, many thoughts occur. However, the salient thought for me, engendered by our Democratic friends' anti-Russian rhetoric, is that many years ago, during the early stages of the Cold War, the John Birch Society tried to warn us.

FILE - This May 14, 2017, file photo distributed by the North Korean government shows the "Hwasong-12," a new type of ballistic missile at an undisclosed location in North Korea. North Korea on Monday, May 15, 2017 boasted it successfully launched a new type of "medium long-range" ballistic rocket that can carry a heavy nuclear warhead, an escalation of its nuclear program. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this photo. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP, File)

Recognizing the threat from Latin America

Two weeks ago, federal and local government officials, law enforcement and first responders in Washington, D.C. and New York City participated in scheduled exercises, a simulation of a "complex coordinated terror attack." One scenario included a nuclear incident on a major U.S. metropolitan area. Some news outlets linked this effort to heightened concerns about North Korea. However, closer to home, more pertinent developments went virtually unnoticed.

Illustration of Emmanuel Macron by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Macron's narrow window for reforming France

Liberal internationalists heralded Emmanuel Macron's landslide in the French presidential election as a nearly decisive victory for their globalist vision over populist sentiments rippling through Europe and symbolized by Brexit and Donald Trump -- they shouldn't.

Kim Jong-un Missile Mouth Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

China plays the North Korea nuclear card

The provocative actions by North Korea over the past three months since President Trump took office should not come as a surprise. In his campaign for the presidency, candidate Donald Trump repeatedly criticized the Obama administration for failing to take stronger action against China's illegal actions in the South China Sea.

Over-Taxed Flag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cutting the drag of heavy corporate taxes

On Thursday, the House Ways and Means Committee will have a hearing examining how tax reform will grow our economy and create jobs.

Illustration on renewing border security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Border security and immigration made simple

The nation-state is a relatively new idea -- scholars generally trace it back to the 17th century. It has its flaws, but has anyone come up with a better approach to world order? A nation-state enjoys sovereignty over its territory. Territories are separated by borders. Securing those borders may require barriers and controlled points of entry.

What collusion?

After months of investigations by the House, Senate and intelligence agencies, not a scintilla of evidence has surfaced that President Trump or his campaign staff colluded with Russia to win the presidential election. Still a daily cacophony of Democratic charges of collusion drowns the media. But even more remarkable is that no one has noticed the Brontosaurus in the room: Hillary Clinton said that if she were elected president she would proclaim a "no-fly zone" in Syria. That means the United States would shoot down Russian planes flying over Syria, a casus belli.

JAG not above law

I am puzzled about how retired Rear Adm. Patrick J. Lorge was coerced in 2015 by the-judge advocate general (JAG) of the Navy and her deputy (now the JAG). Rear Adm. Lorge claims they persuaded him "not to exonerate the sailor because it would be bad public relations for the Navy and hurt" his career ("Pentagon brass improperly interfered in Navy SEAL's sexual-assault case, retired admiral claims," Web, May 12). He was already scheduled to retire in 2015, so I do not see an effect on his Navy career unless they were talking about his post-retirement career or were threatening to have him retired as an O-7 instead of O-8.

Remembering the ill-fated dirigible

The 20th century history being filled with disasters, it is not surprising that we seem to be buffeted by one melancholy anniversary after another. But there are disasters and disasters, many of them like the terrible battles of World War I where hundreds of thousands died and were horribly wounded that dwarf the subject of this book.

Cadet Drew Borinstein, right, the valedictorian of the VMI Class of 2017, is congratulated after taking the oath of office as a Marine on Monday, May 15, 2017 in Lexington, Va.  In August, Borinstein's mother, brother and sister were killed in an airplane crash near Fredericksburg while on the way to watch him graduate from an officer training program. The tragedy followed the unexpected death of his father 16 months earlier. Borinstein soldiered on at VMI, completing his academic work with honors while preparing for the military.   (Stephanie Klein-Davis /The Roanoke Times via AP)  /The Roanoke Times via AP)

Sexual confusion in the colors

Patriotism is the old-fashioned path to celebrity. These days just acting out can punch the ticket to fame, if not fortune. Just ask Bradley Manning, aka Chelsea Manning, the American soldier who sold out his country, then his manhood -- not necessarily in that order — to WikiLeaks. He/she emerges from prison Wednesday through the intercession of Barack Obama, but the United States will pay the price for the treachery he/she flaunted if the military risks a repeat.

President Donald Trump watches Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan depart the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 16, 2017. The White House defended Trump's disclosure of classified information to senior Russian officials as "wholly appropriate," as Trump tried to beat back criticism from fellow Republicans and calm international allies increasingly wary about sharing their secrets with the new president. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Settling the voter-fraud debate

President Trump made good last week on a promise to create a Presidential Commission on Election Integrity, and surely this was a promise kept that everyone could applaud. Who but cheats and frauds doesn't like clean elections? Who doesn't want his vote to count, and his vote not be canceled by someone ineligible to cast a ballot? This was something that would surely warm hearts at the Brennan Center for Justice and at the League of Women Voters.