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Warren G. Harding (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump, the unstoppable force of nature — maybe

- The Washington Times

The dogs bark, the flies scatter, the gasbags at the conventions send enormous clouds of toxic waste to hover over Cleveland and Philadelphia that won’t dissipate until Labor Day, and the caravan moves on. Election Day approaches, and rarely have so many been so disappointed with the choice before us.

Fathers Absent from "Black Lives Matter" Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s real agenda

Unless you have been “off the grid” for a while, you have heard a lot in the news about Black Lives Matter. This “movement” has gotten a lot of press and some notable praise from celebrities and politicians, including positive mentions from President Obama. But I suspect that most people, including many who have tweeted #blacklivesmatter, have not visited its website.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's position in support of the Democratic base by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s mixed messages

- The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter, Black Panthers, Occupy Wall Street, Socialists, Communists, those who want to strip God from their party platform, LGBTQ activists, Planned Parenthood, Hispanics, white-working class union workers, Wall Street, and climate-change mongers, all have a place in the Democratic Party.

Illustration on the relationship between Pakistani government corruption and the rise of Islamist violence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How religious extremists thrive

As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton spar over security and foreign aid, those of us living in Pakistan wonder how we ended up in the rearview mirror of the debate. American taxpayers spend billions of dollars per year in Pakistan — a nuclear state with religious extremists baying at the door — and next door in Afghanistan, where the Taliban are ensconced.

Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending religious liberty

I write with a deep and growing concern about the future of religious liberty in the United States.

Mike Pence, Conservative Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Pence makes sense

Whenever I talk to conservatives across the country about the presidential election, a common refrain is that they find Donald Trump refreshing in many ways. They like that he eschews political correctness and promises to stand up for ordinary Americans against the elites.

SM-3 Missile Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending against the growing missile threat

Both Iran and North Korea are rogue nations developing and testing new missile technologies at an alarming rate. Iran threatens U.S. forces and has missile technology to carry out those threats. North Korea has successfully tested missiles that can be fired from submarines and is threatening to use them.

Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

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GOP delegates must vote

Just as the Founders of the greatest republic known to man understood that the only way for a free and just society to exist requires government control left in the hands of the people, the very same applies today.

 Downey Baptist Church in Downey, Iowa. (David Scrivner/Iowa City Press-Citizen via AP)  NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

A state religion for Iowa

Christ told his followers, in the 22d chapter of the Gospel of Matthew, to "render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's, and render unto God the things that are God's." This is so plain and simple that even a cave man could understand it, but a number of busybody bureaucrats in Iowa have decided that everything belongs to Caesar. It's a skirmish of the war on faith and the people of faith.

Baltimore state's attorney Marilyn Mosby, center, arrives at a courthouse before opening statements in the trial of Lt. Brian Rice, one of six members of the Baltimore Police Department charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, in Baltimore, Thursday, July 7, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

A tale of three cities

Human passions are easily stirred by considerations of race, and such emotions can lead to very different places. The moving spectacle of Dallas leadership trying to soothe the racial anger that triggered the killing of five white police officers stands in contrast to the proceedings in Baltimore, where city officials are determined to make cops, black and white, pay for the death of Freddie Gray.

Illustration on the 1924 Republican convention by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The first Republican convention in Cleveland

If you think this year's Republican National Convention is one for the record books in terms of surprises, speakers and serendipity, you should be informed about the Republican shindig in 1924. It was really different. It was the one that nominated Calvin Coolidge, who ascended to the White House on the death of President Warren Harding in August 1923.

Illustration on education members of the armed forces by Linas Garsys/the Washington Times

Educating warriors for current readiness and future success

Recruiting and retaining capable and motivated service members is paramount to maintaining a high-quality fighting force to defend our country. It is undeniable that educational and training assistance programs are critical to attracting men and women to join and remain in military service.

Illustration on impending U.S. government financial collapse by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A 'Blueprint for Reform'

You've probably heard the saying, "If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging." If so, you're one up on President Obama and Congress, who have spent the last seven-and-a-half years making a bad situation worse.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Madison's Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention'

Pious politicians who anoint themselves as "strict constructionists" of the U.S. Constitution are akin to Christian fundamentalists who assert that the King James Version of the Bible was literally dictated by the Lord Almighty to 47 Church of England scholars during the Creator's spare time between 1604 and 1611. One has to squint very hard to see any truth in divine inspiration for either document.

Illustration on the complementary qualities of Donald Trump and Mike Pence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pence is salt to Trump's pepper

The announcement by Donald Trump of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate had not yet been made official last Thursday, but that didn't stop the hard left from hauling out its familiar and overused rhetoric.

Burning Book Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Book burners and gun banners

Environmental zealots and the politically correct have become modern-day book burners in their attempts to criminalize and repress the speech of those who disagree with them. The Nazis and other dictatorial regimes used the old practice of book burnings and gun seizures as a way of maintaining control and intimidation.

Trump's Hard Hat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's pitch to union members

Donald Trump's choice of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate will only intensify Big Labor's attacks against him.

Mario Hicks, middle, holds a sign as he chants and marches during a Black Lives Matter march and rally in Sanford, Fla., Sunday, July 17, 2016. Sanford police chief Cecil Smith is pictured in the background at far right. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

The lies of Black Lives Matter

- The Washington Times

The Black Lives Matter movement was built and perpetuated on numerous lies, and yet their cause continues to be championed by President Obama and democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Illustration on the potential impeachment of a President Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary's historic hat trick

The presidential election year of 2016 has been a remarkable one. For the first time in the history of the United States, a woman is the presumptive nominee of a major political party. Add to that the doubly historic incidence of the first spouse of a previous president being nominated for the same office by the same major political party.

Chart to accompany Moore article of July 18, 2016

Girding for the annual funding fight

The worst-kept secret in Washington, D.C. is that Congress will once again fail to do its most basic constitutional job and pass legislation to fund the federal government beyond the end of the current fiscal year on September 30.

FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2016 file photo, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Commissioner John Koskinen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. House conservatives on July 13, 2016, have taken the first step to force an impeachment vote on Koskinen. Conservatives accuse Koskinen of gross negligence, arguing he stonewalled their investigation into IRS targeting of conservative groups. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

When bullies get pushback

The most important thing to learn about bullies is that they don't expect resistance, and when it comes, they often back down -- but not if the pushback isn't serious.

Stifling Cost of Government Regulations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Government is the problem, not the solution'

On its face, government regulation is good. It delivers clean air and water. It stops black lung and other diseases. It interdicts miscreants who would lure you into bad investments and disciplines those who falsely promise million-dollar investment returns. Government is your protector, your friend.

Trump a changed man

Many Republicans and conservatives have one big thing in common these days: They don't trust Donald Trump. In him they see a man who has been a Democrat and has supported liberals, including the Clintons, for years. It certainly is easy to see why people distrust him, particularly when he is so bombastic, insulting and demanding.