Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on Memorial Day by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Showing America’s gratitude

Orderly rows of white headstones line national cemeteries throughout our country. Each bears a name and behind that is a story of sacrifice. Today, a grateful nation remembers, but there is more we can do.

Illustration on remembering the sacrifices of U.S. Special Operators by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why special operators’ families must be remembered

Memorial Day is set aside for us to remember those who have fallen in defense of our country. This year’s observance should remind us that too many of us pay too little attention to the war that erupted on 9/11 in which Americans are still fighting, and sometimes dying, in many places around the world.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk from Marine One across the South Lawn to the White House in Washington, Saturday, May 27, 2017, as they return from Sigonella, Italy. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

No, Trump didn’t cause Obamacare to fail

It’s finally official. Obamacare is a public policy flop of epic proportions. That’s the only possible conclusion from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City announcement last week that it will drop out of many markets in Kansas and Missouri.

Karen Clarkson, of Fairbanks, Alaska, kneels and cries at the grave of her son U.S. Army Sergeant Joel Clarkson on Memorial Day at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Monday, May 28, 2012. (Rod Lamkey Jr/The Washington Times)

The bitter history of Memorial Day

It used to be called Decoration Day and was observed on May 30. Today it’s commonly known as Memorial Day and is celebrated on the last Monday in May, mostly to give Americans a long weekend. But it used to be a solemn remembrance of the nation’s war dead — by decorating graves with spring flowers.

Former US President Barack Obama is awarded the German Media Prize 2016 in Baden-Baden, Germany, Thursday, May 25, 2017.(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Related Articles

The U.S. flag flies in front of the Capitol dome on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 4, 2017. (Associated Press) **FILE**

A dumb amendment for a dumber age

May 20 marks 25 years since the 27th Amendment to the Constitution was declared ratified -- more than 200 years after it was first proposed to the states.

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon talks, during First Minister's Questions at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, Thursday May 11, 2017. Britain will hold a general election on June 8. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

The big hack attack and the NHS

The ransomware cyberattack that wormed its way into at least 74 countries recently exposed new vulnerabilities in the United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS), as if it weren't vulnerable enough.

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto, top left, pauses while speaking to the press, at the end of a press conference where he announced measures intended to protect journalists, in Mexico City, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Pena said he is taking actions to halt slayings of journalists, without giving specifics, and promised more resources to help those under threat. Past measures have been ineffective in stopping the bloodshed among the country's media workers. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

When the press plays 'gotcha,' nobody wins

It's a difficult time to be proud of everything about America. The president is vilified from all sides (some criticism deserved, some not), and what's difficult to defend is the democratic process as we've used it to produce both the likes of Donald Trump and the press that rushes like lemmings to judgment.

Contraception in Catholic Colleges Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Catholic collegiate contraception complicity

President Trump's latest executive order titled "Promoting Free Speech and Religious Liberty," potentially ends the enforcement of the Obama administration's Health and Human Services (HHS) contraception mandate requiring all employers -- including religious institutions -- to provide health insurance that covers contraception.

Illustration on the challenge of Middle East peace negotiations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Five steps toward achieving Middle East peace

Donald Trump's decision to visit Saudi Arabia during his first overseas trip as president creates the perfect opportunity for his administration to take positive steps toward addressing five key needs in the region.

Trump Still Has All His Marbles Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turning political disagreement into a disease

How could legislators get rid of a president who appalls them but who has not committed high crimes and misdemeanors, the conventional legal grounds for impeachment?

Illustration on investigating government leaks by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Donald Trump's seven days in May

In a period of seven days this month, President Trump fired James Comey as director of the FBI and was accused of sharing top-secret intelligence data with the Russian foreign minister and the Russian ambassador to the United States, the latter a known Russian spy.

Political 'twilight zone'

Welcome to the real-life twilight zone. During the first scene you'll notice the Islamic immigration policies of Western nations. The general populace in these in these countries does not desire these policies, yet the governments force them on their people -- despite the fact that they bring an increase in crime and political demonstrations. Notice that the news media promotes these policies and keeps silent on immigrant crimes, such as rape of native women.

Impeachment would backfire

The "deep state" has done everything imaginable to destroy a man, our president, any way it can. The entrenched dishonorable people within the government who have provided classified information to the mainstream media in this effort are symbolic of a broken government operating by the Obama/Clinton rules of extra-constitutional governance.

President Donald Trump walks across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 17, 2017, following his short trip on Marine One from nearby Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump was returning to Washington after speaking at today's U.S. Coast Guard Academy Commencement Ceremony. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The anonymous 'heroes' of the Resistance

Anonymous sources may not always be reliable, but they're always convenient. More than that, anonymous accounts are usually made of putty, soft and easily shaped. Not only that, an anonymous source never claims he was misquoted. He never demands a correction or a retraction. The Washington Post, which deals in anonymous sources for many of its blockbuster disclosures, is particularly skilled at working with anonymous sources, and gets more out of them than almost any other newspaper.

Demonstrators hold candles during a vigil for the victims of the clashes with the government's security forces, during protest against President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Several humanitarian organizations and the opposition have accused the security forces of using too much violence during demonstrations against the government, which have left dozens dead.(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

The deadly peril in Venezuela

If Venezuela burns, the United States will feel the heat. Like a nearby brush fire, the Venezuelan civil war threatens to erupt in a conflagration that will disrupt life throughout the hemisphere. Americans are accustomed to watching tinderboxes from half a world away, but this one is too close for comfort.

James B. Comey's firing will have immediate and long-term ramifications. (Associated Press)

As questions mount, the White House could use a few good answers

President Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James B. Comey has set in motion a series of events that present the most serious threat to his presidency yet. We can all speculate where we would be had Mr. Trump not decided to dismiss the FBI director, but the simple fact is that the White House has lost the ability to control where this story goes from here.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. listens to a reporter's question before a policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

John McCain wildly proclaims 'Watergate' at Trump's door

- The Washington Times

Sen. John McCain, self-proclaimed Republican but not-so-secret Democrat, came out in full force against his own party's president, saying the many scandals rocking the White House lately are reaching "Watergate" proportions. Easy there, McCain. Let's reel back the rhetoric a bit and consider a more level-headed look at these so-called scandals.

In this Oct. 14, 2014, file photo, Kimberly Guilfoyle arrives at the New York special screening of "Fury," in New York. Fox News host Guilfoyle said in a Monday, May 15, 2017, interview with the Mercury News in San Jose, Calif., that she is in conversations with the Trump administration about replacing Sean Spicer as White House press secretary. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

Kimberly Guilfoyle would be great

- The Washington Times

Fox News host, attorney and all-around blunt talker Kimberly Guilfoyle has been making the media rounds of late, suggesting personal interest in replacing Sean Spicer as White House press secretary. This would be a great move for the White House -- for President Donald Trump's defense team.

Illustration on the need for a U.S. revamp of it's nuclear missile capability in a changed world by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Revamping America's nuclear posture

The nuclear weapons world has just changed for the fourth time. We're in a new world, and new policies and actions are required.