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Rep. Keith Ellison (Associated Press)

Democrats wasting time hating Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Democrats who confuse hating Donald Trump with Mom and apple pie as the all-American recipe to win elections are blowing their chances, such as they are, for the 2018 midterm elections. If you’re a Democrat it’s never too soon to fret and stew about the prospects.

Lobbying Trump Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lobbying in the age of Trump

A conservative wit once said that if you want to know who runs Washington, you should look under “association” in the Washington phone book. The line gets a good laugh, but it’s unfair — which may be why it gets the laugh. And it’s particularly unfair to small businesses and companies employing forgotten middle-class workers.

Religious Freedom Problems in Turkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey’s wavering support for religious freedom

I walked into the Ankara airport on Dec. 20, after a long day of eye-opening meetings, to the news on CNN International — the Russian ambassador to Turkey had just been shot. Our U.S. ambassador to Turkey, John Bass, a career diplomat who expertly navigated our previous 24 hours of intensive meetings, was standing next to me. He calmly pulled out his cellphone and started making calls.

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2013 file photo, animal rights activist and co-founder of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) Ingrid Newkirk lies on a mock barbecue stand as a sign of protest in Mumbai, celebrating World Vegan Month, a month long celebration of a health, environment- and animal-friendly vegan diet. PETA turns 35 years old in 2015, is the largest animal rights group in world with 3 million members, and has done a lot with a little sex, shock and celebrity.(AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool, File)

Is veganism a mental disorder?

Contrary to the national and local debates we have about securing the border, anchor babies and sanctuary cities, the Swiss have a different system to determine who stays and who goes. Your neighbors get to vote on your citizenship. It’s a policy that at a minimum should promote politeness.

Trump, the Rough Rider Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump and the Rough Rider’s conservation ethos

President-elect Donald Trump said in December that he will honor the legacy of Theodore Roosevelt and “conserve and protect our natural resources for the next generation.” Moving quickly to back it up, he nominated Montana Rep. Ryan Zinke as his secretary of interior.

Stickers for voters are seen on a table at a polling station Tuesday, April 26, 2016 in Wayne, Pa. Attention is shifting from a well-worn campaign trail to the voting booths as Pennsylvanians cast ballots Tuesday on presidential primary contests, including the first competitive Republican primary in decades, and races for Congress and state offices. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)

Reversing a dangerous power grab

Being an informed citizen means keeping up with the news, however tricky it may be to find reliable sources. But sometimes even that’s not enough. It’s easy to get distracted by the latest shouting match and miss some important item that slips by almost unnoticed.

Fake news from the intelligence agencies

The news stories about the alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election won’t end this week, this month or this year. That narrative is just a new version of the “Bush was selected, not elected” meme from the 2000 election.

Trump’s billionaire dealmakers

With Donald Trump, the nation is about to embark on a bold experiment in government management. To guide the economy, he has selected billionaire dealmakers and folks with marketing expertise and shunned seasoned policy experts.

President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks during his farewell address at McCormick Place in Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Czechoslovakia redux

Amidst concern over Sunday’s international conference in Paris and the ensuing meeting of the United Nations on Tuesday, there is an increasing fear the leading powers will again take action against Israel.

The Benefits of Criminal Justice Reform Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the states can show the way

While the nation is still waiting to see if Congress will take up criminal justice reform, states have been quietly getting the job done. A new Urban Institute report shows that states participating in the Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI) have saved over a billion dollars thus far through smart reforms to sentencing laws, pretrial practices, and prison release policies. Moreover, this has enhanced public safety.

Global Strategy and the New President Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How global risks will test the new administration

Donald Trump assumes the presidency of the United States amid an era of global disorder unseen in decades. New challenges to former American preeminence in Europe, the Middle East and the Pacific Rim are boldly ventured by Russia, Iran and China with near impunity.

Political Target Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A petulant attack against Rex Tillerson

- The Washington Times

Sen. Marco Rubio took to the Senate floor on Wednesday to grandstand against President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for secretary of State, former Exxon Mobile CEO Rex Tillerson.

Parents Choosing Education Alternatives Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The power of school choice

Fifteen years ago, a new Republican president entered the White House heady with talk about revolutionizing K-12 education in America.

President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Cracks in his campaign promises

Republicans moved quickly this week toward confirming President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominations, as widening cracks began appearing in some of his major campaign promises.

Related Articles

A student walks the University of Maryland campus. (Facebook, University of Maryland) **FILE**

News from the College Park cuckoo's nest

A sequel of sorts to the 1975 film, "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," is playing out at the University of Maryland at College Park, where the inmates are threatening to take over the asylum. The cuckoo's nest, which the movie set in Oregon, has been moved to College Park.

America's Home Sweet Home Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The intellectual argument for the Trump presidency

Everyone's wondering just what kind of president Donald Trump will make. Democrats and Republicans, liberals and conservatives, Tories and Whigs (there must be a few of them still tucked away somewhere) who are still talking to each other, have embraced timid and tentative expectations.

American Adoption of Foreign Children Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uniting Obama and Trump to save children

The outgoing and incoming administrations are battling over pending regulations and appointments. The Obama administration wants to solidify its policies, and the transitional Trump team wants a free hand implementing new policies. Understandably, there is little room for agreement on many of these issues.

Thomas Jefferson, upon winning the presidential election of 1800, called for the putting aside of partisan politics. (White House Historical Association)

How liberalism was transformed

Winston Churchill once noted, "If you're not a liberal at 20, you have no heart, and if you're not a conservative at 40, you have no head."

The Chicago carnage

Chicago has come a long way from the idealized lyric, "My kind of town, Chicago is," which Frank Sinatra made famous.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The First Victory: The Second World War and the East Africa Campaign'

It says a great deal for the British fighting spirit during World War II that they were able to maintain it through years which, for the most part, brought only one disaster after another. Occasionally, one of these, like the withdrawal from Dunkirk in May 1940 salvaging part of the British Expeditionary Force, which otherwise would have fallen into German hands, could be cast in a positive light.

The scandals that Valerie Jarrett overlooked

Over the New Year's weekend, President Obama's chief policy adviser and closest strategist, Valerie Jarrett, told a talk show host that her boss would have a happy legacy because there was an absence of scandal in his administration. When first I heard this preposterous claim, I thought I had misheard it.

American Drug Crisis Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When the drug crisis hits home

No one wants to read about drug addiction, abuse, overdose numbers and young death. Why should they? Why should anyone who is steady, healthy and cogent enough to be combing a newspaper, or scanning news on their iPhone care much about someone who -- all the world assumes -- lost their own future, made avoidable mistakes? Not my lane. Not my worry. Not my world, right? Wrong.

Sexual Assault Police Industry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Denying due process for campus sex assault cases

No longer content to deny due process to accused university students in the wake of often unsubstantiated and frequently false charges of sexual harassment and assault, there is now a movement toward destroying any hope for these students to transfer to other colleges and universities.

Members of the state Assembly listen to an address by Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, D-Paramount, at the in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

Failing the children of California

At the start of each new year we're subjected to a whole host of new laws. The modern liberal government, you see, imagines itself not as the champion of individual freedom but as Mommy and Daddy, a taskmaster charged with controlling your life. Most of the time, it makes everything, including our lives, worse.

Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to the media on Capitol Hill in Washington on Nov. 29, 2016. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Delay of game

What goes around comes around, and never more often than in the partisan games politicians play. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, the new leader of the Democrats in the U.S. Senate, is determined to put a quick finish to whatever honeymoon Donald Trump may get when he becomes the president two weeks hence.

FILE - In this July 15, 2016 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell speaks during a session about opioids at the National Governors Association meeting, in Des Moines, Iowa. Addressing worries about rising premiums and dwindling competition, Burwell says the federal health care overhaul is sustainable even without any legislative fixes from Congress. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

Striking a blow for good sense

When the urge to be edgy leads to fad, the unique, the uncommon and sometimes the weird and goofy is suddenly high fashion. In 2016, "transgenderism," the urge to be what you're not, became a fad. A visitor from Mars might think that every Earthling is determined only to change his sex and find an inappropriate place to pee.

Attorney General Nominee Jeff Sessions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A media noose for Jeff Sessions

Dishonest media attacks against President-Elect Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general, Jeff Sessions, won't derail his confirmation. But it's important to discuss where they come from because not everyone who realizes their origin is comfortable with that conversation.

Man of No Substance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's coming obscurity

President Obama will leave office after eight years of strutting even while sitting down, of preening even while standing up, of swanking while playing 18 holes. Yet he remains the first president in American history to cast no shadow. Jimmy Carter cast a pale and minuscule shadow. Lyndon Johnson cast an obscene shadow. Mr. Obama leaves absolutely no shadow, even in the moonlight.