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Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Claire McCaskill’s crusade could hurt Native American rights

Let’s establish an important legal concept and set the context. The legal term “sovereign immunity,” according to the Wex Legal Dictionary, means that “the government cannot be sued without its consent.” This doctrine has applied to the federal government, states, public universities and Native American tribes for many years.

Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

Illustration on salvaging the U.S./Iran nuclear agreement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s third way

President Trump made a tough call last week. European diplomats and an “echo chamber” in the mainstream media were insisting he “recertify” the nuclear weapons deal his predecessor concluded with Iran’s rulers in 2015.

The Clinton Protection Racquet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary and Harvey’s shared fate

I have been fascinated by Harvey Weinstein’s initial response to charges that the Bathrobed Romeo sexually molested women. His statement was at once otherworldly and yet weirdly similar to Hillary Clinton’s eventual response to the scandal. I say “eventual response” because it took her over a week to comment. Obviously, Hillary’s lawyers and public relations magicians had to word her response very carefully.

Illustration on the failure to "contain" Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How America has failed to contain Russia

Seventy years ago, George Kennan’s “Sources of Soviet Conduct” set the course for U.S. containment policy toward the Soviet Union. Following the Soviet Union’s collapse and a decade of economic turmoil which resulted in reduced Russian regional as well as global influence, President Vladimir Putin began implementing a national security strategy to resurrect Russia’s great power status. He wanted Russia to be perceived as equal in stature to the United States and to ensure western ideals of freedom, liberty, and democracy would not threaten his regime security.

Teaching the Birds and Bees at School Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How federally funded sex education sexualizes schoolchildren

Upon returning to middle school from an orthodontist appointment to tighten his braces, 12-year-old Johnny struggles through a pre-algebra lecture then schlepps off to his health class where he is instructed in anal sex, oral sex, masturbation and sexual fantasy.

William Dodd Jr. speaks on the radio during debate within the United States on whether to enter World War II. International News Service photo.

How Russians meddled in the 1938 election

Did Russia meddle in the 2016 presidential election? President Donald Trump emphatically says “no.” But the hierarchy of the U. S. intelligence community is equally firm in saying “yes.” With three probes in progress — two by Congress, another by an independent counsel — an answer perhaps will eventually be found.

Related Articles

Illustration on the future of Europe by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

We'll always have Paris

Europeans seem to have an increasingly bizarre and perhaps self-destructive view of the world, and their place in it. Last week's most creative illustration: The Irish postal service issued a stamp to "commemorate" the 50th anniversary of the death of "Argentinian Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara."

Alternate Canadian Flag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Holocaust denial in Canada

Last week, Canada became the most recent industrialized country to officially commemorate the Holocaust by dedicating its first National Holocaust Monument in Ottawa. However, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's unveiling of the monument also unveiled the glaring omission of any mention of Jews, anti-Semitism or the 6 million Jews who were murdered in the genocide.

President Donald Trump, left, and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, right, walk out together to speak to members of the media following their meeting at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., Friday, Aug. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Saving public lands for working Americans

This past weekend, a little-known holiday was celebrated. National Public Lands Day, which was created in 1994, serves to "connect people to public lands in their community, inspire environmental stewardship, and encourage use of public lands for education, recreation, and general health." While National Public Lands Day may be an obscure holiday, the issue of the future of public lands is a critical one and one being hotly debated across the country today.

Tax Reaper Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why tax cuts will be a tough sell

President Trump's team has proposed tax relief for ordinary Americans and businesses that would boost growth and create jobs. Unfortunately, the recent stock market surge indicates expectations may exceed the gains tax savings could actually provide.

Illustration emphasizing U.S./ Azerbaijani cooperation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Trump must engage Azerbaijan

As President Trump and his foreign policy team focus on the challenges posed by North Korea's reckless nuclear ambition, Russia's increasing belligerent stance, China's patient but determined quest for hegemony in Asia, and a resurgent Taliban in Afghanistan, we should not ignore one of America's most steadfast and reliable allies: Azerbaijan.

Susan Melton is comforted by James Warren Melton as she takes her seat before her son Sonny Melton's funeral at Big Sandy High School, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017,  in Big Sandy, Tenn. Melton, a registered nurse, died protecting his wife during the Las Vegas shooting massacre.  (Morgan Timms /The Jackson Sun via AP)

Revering life after Las Vegas

In the aftermath of the most deadly massacre in American history a friend asks: "Why would God allow a man to wreak so much carnage?" And the enormous violence clearly weakened my friend's belief in God. It should not have weakened his belief in God. Who else or what other agent is around to take the place of the Uncaused Cause?

The Tarnished Image of Harvey Weinstein Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hollywood's dishonest campus rape panic

For all of its flaws and fabrications, "The Hunting Ground," Harvey Weinstein's activist documentary film about sexual assault on college campuses, finally succeeded in helping to actually identify a real predator -- the filmmaker himself.

Securing Taiwan, saving America

Forget Graham Allison's oversold volume on the so-called Thucydides Trap. If you want to read one essential China policy book this year that offers some hope that your children need not be condemned to a century of wars with China, then read "The Chinese Invasion Threat" by Ian Easton, a research fellow with the Project 2049 Institute.

Pull the plug on the NFL

One thing black folks have in common with the NFL is the billions of dollars we represent in sports marketing. We must learn to use our collective influences to affect change where there is racial injustice and disparity in our communities.

President Trump spent much time before his election criticizing former President Barack Obama for spending what he said was too much time away from the White House on golf courses, and using taxpayer moneys to fund such excursions. However, once in office, Mr. Trump has made many similar golf outings. (Associated Press photographs)

Trump plays golf, shoots 73. Haters go crazy.

Kim Jong-il, the late supreme leader of North Korea, was one heckuva golfer. He only played once, in 1994, and he reportedly shot a 38-under-par round on the country's only golf course, including 11 holes-in-one (although some reports say he only had five). That's right: Par was 72; he shot a 34. His worst score all round long was a birdie.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson looks on as President Donald Trump speaks at a luncheon with South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump, Tillerson -- WTFreak

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump, reportedly stung when his secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, was said to have called him a "moron," struck back -- as the president is wont to do -- and snarked in a just-released Forbes article that of the two, it's his own presidential self who's actually the smarter.

Swap football for patriotic rugby

I want to thank Vice President Pence for walking out on the NFL and their overpaid traitors. I'm also grateful for President Donald Trump and his game-changing leadership of America-first values, processes, improvements and benefits. It was the Soros-Clinton-Democratic-National-Committee operatives who approached the NFL Players' Union in the first place — and ultimately Colin Kaepernick and his copy-cat resistors — are solely responsible for this mess.

Left silent on Chicago gun violence

The Las Vegas massacre was a terrible man-made atrocity, with 58 innocents dead. It led the Democrats to scream about gun control without giving the affected victims and their love ones the opportunity to heal. Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California was among the most vocal, along with the loser of the 2016 presidential election.

Tax Cuts Growing the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stuck on stupendous mistakes

What do you call someone who keeps making the same mistake over and over and fails to learn from others who have made a similar mistake? If one doesn't know history and basic math, and the fact that people adjust their behavior on the basis of incentives, then one should not prove ignorance by commenting on the likely effects of tax changes.

Illustration on Taiwan's national day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An unhappy birthday for Taiwan

Tuesday is Taiwan's national day (known as Double Ten Day), commemorating the Wuchang Uprising, which led to the establishment of the Republic of China (ROC) in 1912. The Republic of China on Taiwan is the true heir to Sun Yat-sen's revolution.

Possible Dreamer Solution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A 'Dreamer' solution based on the rule of law

After faith and family, my country is most important. I am an American by choice, arriving here in 1969, $5,000 in debt. India was my motherland; America became my Karma-land, the provider of opportunity and systems that sustained me through the rigors of higher education, career, raising a family and serving the community. I love them both, but in the end I am an American.