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Illustration on the success of Trumponomics in red states by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Where Trumponomics is working

One reason the two of us were so confident that President Trump’s economic policies would be positive for workers, the economy and the stock market, is that we’ve seen first-hand these policies work in the states. Many liberal economists have been insisting that Mr. Trump’s promise of a 3 or 4 percent growth is a fantasy and that 2 percent growth is the best we can do.

Modest Growth Rate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax cut reality

As Republicans balance competing interests to craft a tax cut, both Democrats and the Trump administration are making outrageous claims.

Making Pyramid Schemes Illegal Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping shady business practices at bay

Scams affect us all. As Nebraska’s attorney general from 2003-2015, one of my key priorities was safeguarding against scams. In 2010, I helped Nebraska’s Legislature pass a model law to protect consumers from pyramid schemes. Similar laws have now been adopted in 21 states.

Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique

A dictators’ clique of China, Russia, Iran and North Korea threatens democracies everywhere. They are more dangerous than any past dictators because they have or are about to have nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. The best way for peace-loving nations to oppose these dictators is through a global coalition centered on the United States and Europe. The U.S. and European democracies led coalitions that defeated dictators in the World War I, World War II and the Cold War. They can do it again.

Illustration on police and minorities by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Deadly Democratic cities

After a speech in Middletown, Pennsylvania, this week, President Trump sat for an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. No doubt it was friendly territory. For the president, Mr. Hannity’s questions were underhand softballs tossed down the center of the plate, and the replies were vintage Trump.

Illustration on the strategic importance of an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward an independent Kurdistan

The autonomous Kurdistan region of northern Iraq held a referendum on independence on Sept. 25. It was overwhelmingly approved. This referendum, not surprisingly however, has precipitously raised tensions not only with Iraq but also with Turkey, Syria and Iran, all of which have large — and restive — Kurdish minorities.

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Related Articles

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly began by saying, "Although I read it all the time, pretty consistently, I'm not quitting today." (Associated Press)

The general schools doltish press corps

- The Washington Times

Gen. John Kelly stepped to the podium in the White House briefing room and delivered a bare-bottom, wire-brush, red-rash public spanking of the political press Thursday-- the likes of which we have never seen in the age of modern media. Except, perhaps, every single time President Trump addresses the media or hurls fiery bolts of Twitter lightning in their general direction.

Boy Scouts of America leaders say they will start developing the next generation of female leaders and allow families to participate in outdoor activities together. (Associated Press/File)

Boy Scouts are for boys, not girls

- The Washington Times

The Boy Scouts of America just announced it was going to allow girls to take part in its scouting program -- to earn the group's highest leadership rank, the Eagle Scout. This is a mistake. Boy Scouts should stay all boy; similarly, the Girl Scouts should stay all girl.

In this June 5, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in Baltimore. Clinton says she's "shocked and appalled" by the revelations of sexual abuse and harassment being leveled at Harvey Weinstein. She says in a written statement on Oct. 10, that the behavior being reported by women "cannot be tolerated." (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Hillary Clinton, 'appalled' by Harvey Weinstein, still hedges on money

- The Washington Times

Well, finally and at last, and about freaking time. Hillary Clinton came out on CNN on Wednesday to say she was "sick" and "shocked" and "appalled" over the whole Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment-slash-rape allegations floating about the media. But her vow to return Weinstein dollars? Well now, we'll see. Her words suggestion something else.

Then-Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the Justice Department in Washington, in this March 4, 2015, photo. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

NFL kneelers -- all hail the Eric Holder

- The Washington Times

What an interesting connection between one leading voice in the pro-anthem kneeling movement, NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith, and former attorney general, Eric Holder. The former actually worked for the latter. Figures.

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Harvey Weinstein's late accusers

Hillary Clinton: Woods walker, Chardonnay drinker, screamer-into-pillows, sore loser. And now? The recycled claim of Feminist Icon Supporter of All Women. The feminist bar is very low these days.

The honor Jerry Lewis deserved

Legendary entertainer and philanthropist Jerry Lewis has died, after receiving awards from Paris, France, and all over the world, but not from the president of the United States. Why did we deny this icon the opportunity to smell the roses of his success while he lived?

Illustration on preventing Iranian nuclearization by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Iran must be denuclearized

America must not permit Iran to produce nuclear weapons. If a rogue state, the world's No. 1 supporter of terrorism, is allowed to go into the production of nuclear weapons, no other state can be denied them. Proliferation -- in self-defense -- will go wild, and the result will be a world of nuclear horror and chaos, from which there is no return. Here's how it will happen -- and how it can be avoided.

National Identity Restored Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A victory for religious freedom

Last week's guidance memo from the U.S. attorney general -- directing government officials to stop finding ways to make it more difficult for people of faith to live out their beliefs -- is as welcome as it should be unnecessary.

Illustrationon the lecherous culture of Hollywood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A great movie but a lousy life

What is it about these pathetic men with a paunch who imagine their looks and libidos are immortal, and think their excuse for manliness continues to attract sweet young flesh? You might ask some of the women.

Illustration on the legal protections of employees who demonstrate on the job by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Taking a knee and protected speech

Sometimes the public expression of unwanted ideas reaches directly into our living rooms. When President Trump attacked a half-dozen or so professional football players who, instead of standing during the traditional playing of the national anthem prior to football games, "took a knee" by kneeling on one or both of their knees during the anthem, hundreds more players on national television took a knee in defiance of the president.

University Snowflake Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Censorship in Seattle

If it were a plague, the government would rush to quarantine the infected, as occurred during Europe's Black Death in the 14th century.

Illustration on tax reform and trucking by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Trump tax plan to drive economic growth

Trucking is the lifeblood of the American economy. We merge millions of people and machines, 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, to transport nearly every product produced, manufactured and sold. Trucks move approximately 70 percent of the nation's freight, and four out of five communities rely solely on us to deliver the goods to run their businesses, feed their families and fill their homes.

'Mockingbird' offensive

As a full-time sixth-grade substitute teacher, I have discovered that the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book "To Kill a Mockingbird" has multiple usages of the N-word.

President Donald Trump gives thumbs up as he boards Air Force One as he departs Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., as he travels to Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Unplugging the Obama power scheme

New ideas sell better than old, and the trendy idea at the moment, the equivalent of that aroma that comes with new cars, is climate change. Or more precisely, global warming. (New labels are prescribed for fads getting soggy around the edges.) Then along came Donald Trump, who was unafraid to ask the simple question that Al Gore and his anvil chorus dreaded someone asking: Is the current view of how climate works actually accurate? The next generation deserves an honest answer.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., questions Wells Fargo Chief Executive Officer and President Timothy Sloan as he testifies before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Where disaster lurks online

The Democrats pretend to be the party that knows all about high tech. But some of them would get lost on a leisurely Sunday-afternoon drive through Silicon Valley. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, whom the Great Mentioner has suggested for consideration as the Democratic nominee for president, circa 2020, has inserted a couple of provisions into the National Defense Authorization Act which, if enacted, would put in jeopardy just about every Pentagon computer system and leave the country less safe, but — and here's why the Warren mischief is so attractive to Democrats — make the bureaucracy much bigger.

Assessing predatory behavior before it happen

Angela Rose, a survivor activist and the founder and executive director of Promoting Awareness/Victim Empowerment (PAVE), goes on to state that this event that happened 20 years ago had profoundly changed her life. She notes that when Steve Kardian heard her story, he told her that she was lucky to be alive. She learned that statistically, the chances of surviving such an ordeal was less than 5 percent.