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Bankruptcy is the only way Greece can fashion a new beginning

Almost every option facing debt-drenched Greece is bad, but there is only one that will end this Greek tragedy for good. Let Greece go bankrupt. Then let this once-rich nation, hit the restart button to rebuild its economy.

U.S. President Ronald Reagan gestures as Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev looks on after their third session of talks at the Hofdi in Reykjavik, Oct. 12, 1986. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

Obama’s Reykjavik moment

The choice for the president on the Iran nuclear talks is clear: walk away with dignity or appease and submit in disgrace.

Obama’s Clean Power Plan could push millions of minority Americans into poverty

This summer the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will finalize its carbon-dioxide emission regulations under President Obama’s Clean Power Plan. The EPA’s own data projects the regulations will reduce global carbon by less than 1 percent and sea level rise by one one-hundredth of an inch. The price Americans will pay for these “benefits” is layoffs and increased energy rates. Yet for the nation’s most vulnerable, the impacts will be far worse, pushing millions into poverty.

‘Death with dignity’ is often coerced by those with financial interests

Earlier this year, legislation was introduced to the D.C. Council that would legalize physician-assisted suicide in our nation’s capital for an adult patient diagnosed with a terminal condition and less than six months to live. Although this initiative has been introduced in 24 states this year (not passing in any so far), its passage in the District of Columbia this year risks setting a dangerous precedent for the rest of the nation.

(Photo courtesy of The White House)

The surging truth-tellers of the GOP

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is surging in New Hampshire, and Chris Christie’s back on the hunt, sounding like a born-again contender. They’re both long shots — the Donald is off the board — but they’re making the kind of noise the wiseheads say they can’t make.

Members of left wing parties hold placards reading in Greek ''NO'' next to a Presidential Guard, Evzonas, during a protest outside the Greek Parliament in Athens, Sunday, June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says the Bank of Greece has recommended that banks remain closed and restrictions be imposed on transactions, after the European Central Bank didn't increase the amount of emergency liquidity the lenders can access from the central bank. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

The Greeks should vote “no!”

Voting “no” offers Greeks some prospects for better solutions, whereas voting “yes” guarantees penury.

Illustration on the uncontrolled growth of Federal banking regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The squeeze of regulatory kudzu

It is called the vine that ate the South. Kudzu was first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia as an ornamental plant for home gardens. It pretty much stayed that way for half a century, until the federal government got involved. The Roosevelt administration decided that kudzu would be helpful against soil erosion and made it a mission of the Soil Erosion Service to plant kudzu all across the South. Now kudzu covers 12,000 square miles. Kudzu is estimated to smother another 150,000 acres each year.

Energy Independence Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A declaration of energy independence

The United States is closer than ever before to fulfilling the vision of our Founding Fathers. By achieving energy independence, we can achieve freedom from foreign influence.

Fireworks Warning Label Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The sticky legalisms of wacky warning labels

Not too long ago, common sense ruled the day, so called because it was shared by nearly everybody. Common values, commonly understood sense of right and wrong, just and unjust, all expressed in a common language of fairness.

Illustration on raising the minimum wage in light of its effect on Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Puerto Rico’s minimum-wage object lesson

A report released by the Puerto Rican government this week fingers the territory’s minimum wage as a prime factor in its emerging debt crisis. Though its economy is significantly less developed than even the poorest American states, it is still subject to the federal $7.25 minimum wage, 77 percent of its median wage. This high wage floor acts as a significant employment barrier, contributing to the island’s pathetic 43 percent labor force participation rate and its economic stagnation in general.

Illustration on lower-cost tailored television choices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

TV with a choice

Question: What do rabid football fans, working moms and Clifford the Big Red Dog viewers have in common?

Related Articles

CARE Hands Groping for Cash Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Zombie charities push population control

As a conservative, I don't have much use for foreign aid, preferring to support private charitable efforts overseas. But when Washington politicians began to dole out huge sums of money several decades ago, existing nonprofits lined up for their share of the take.

Resist reactive measures

Thoughts are with the victims of last week's South Carolina church shooting. Unfortunately, the left again pushes for divisive, ineffective gun control instead of addressing the root causes of the problem.

Illustration on the coming epidemic of Mexican drugs into the U.S. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama's coming epidemic of drugs

When he assumed office in 2009, President Obama inherited a drug policy success of unprecedented dimensions. Cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, marijuana, and misused opiate prescriptions were all under control or declining. The drug threat, especially for youth, was substantially smaller. That tide of achievement is now reversing.

A Confederate flag flies next to the Alabama Confederate Memorial on the grounds of the Alabama Capitol building in Montgomery, Ala., Monday, June 22, 2015. (Albert Cesare/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP)  NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

Letting no tragedy go to waste

- The Washington Times

The funeral processions to the graveyards in Charleston will be crowded unless the families can keep out the interlopers, exploiters and other cheap opportunists. The easy riders have hitched up their hobbyhorses for the big parade.

People raise their hands as a show of unity as thousands of marchers meet in the middle of Charleston's main bridge after nine black church parishioners were gunned down during a Bible study, Sunday, June 21, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

The Christian example of Charleston

The Civil War, the War Between the States, the War of Northern Aggression, the Late Unpleasantness -- call it what you will depending on your preference -- began in Charleston Harbor with an attack on Fort Sumter, and ended four years later with a northern victory that preserved the Union and freed the slaves.

Illustration on Puerto Rico's fiscal woes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Puerto Rico is America's Greece

Like Greece, the Puerto Rican government has more debt than it can service, and some are calling for a bailout by U.S. taxpayers. The major Puerto Rican state-owned or controlled enterprises are all losing money, including the power authority which is insolvent.

Obama team the true 'JV'

In "Panel told 73 TSA workers no threat despite terror ties" (Web, June 17), the author quotes the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Transportation Security's ranking Democrat, Rep. Kathleen Rice of New York. She said the Transportation Security Administration's failure to vet the security risks "strikes me as sloppy, and there's no place for sloppiness when we're dealing with the security of our nation's aviation system." Really? "Sloppy" is what you call the way your son dresses for school or the condition of your daughter's closet. Criminal is what you call the failure of our government to connect the dots in its ineffective, feeble attempts to safeguard our nation.

A California high school teacher believes the works of William Shakespeare should no longer be a Common Core requirement, because "one white man's view of life" somehow diminishes other cultural perspectives. (Wikipedia)

Who needs Shakespeare?

If there's one man in the history of words and books and speech who needs no defense against the slings and arrows of the envious, it's William Shakespeare, the country lad who grew up to make English the most important language in the world, and to spin tales in it that would instruct, entertain and inspire the millions four centuries after his death.

Gay 'marriage' affects others, too

The Supreme Court will soon rule on marriage. The April hearing brought many questions. Justice Kennedy wondered how the plaintiffs could "know better" than millennia of traditional marriage. Justice Alito mentioned past cultures, such as the ancient Greeks, who accepted homosexuality without redefining marriage. Justice Alito questioned whether redefining marriage would allow polygamous couples to marry. Justice Roberts said, "My question is you're not seeking to join the institution, you're seeking to change what the institution is."

FILE - In this Nov. 3, 2010 file photo, Victor Hernandez stocks apples in the produce section at Whole Foods, in Coral Gables, Fla. Whole Foods on Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014 plans to start rolling out a system that ranks fruits and vegetables as "good," ''better" or "best" based on the supplier's farming practices. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

Eating well, safely

Who's hiding what, and in whose pantry? American farmers and food processors usually take a lot of pride in what they grow and package, and where they grow and package it -- whether jams and jellies from Oregon, prime beef from Texas and Colorado, tacos from New Mexico, fish from New England, peanut butter "proudly made in Arkansas," and fruits and nuts from California's San Joaquin Valley. It's often right on the label.

Why the illegal alien issue towers above all others

The subtitle of this Coulter-style "take-no-prisoners" book would suggest a red-meat laundry list of all the left-wing mischief planned or plotted for the downfall of America. Actually it's mostly about one issue.

Illustration on the negatives of allowing only the top ten polled candidates to participate in debates by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chasing polls before Cleveland

The Republican National Committee and the various networks recruited to co-host this cycle's GOP presidential debates have been wrestling with ways to limit the number of candidates on the platform and have come up with a scheme that is neither fair nor sensible.

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 22, 2015

'Fair and Flat' cuts taxes for all

Rand Paul overnight changed the dynamics of the Republican presidential race on Thursday when he released his Fair and Flat Tax plan. As he said when he unveiled the plan on video: "this is the boldest rewrite of the income tax system in 100 years — and even Ronald Reagan — who dramatically improved the federal tax system — wasn't proposing this sweeping a cleanup of the tax code."

Illustration on the new preeminence of "Transgender Rights" by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Taking diversity to extremes

In the classic TV series "M*A*S*H," Corp. Maxwell Klinger, played by Jamie Farr, dressed in women's clothes in hopes that he might be sent home from the Korean War. Decades later, Pentagon officials have embraced policies that might encourage real-life "Corp. Klingers" to cross-dress in order to qualify for "sexual orientation" diversity promotions.

Trump the boy who cried wolf?

During the 2012 election season Donald Trump was saying a lot of politically incorrect things that were right on the mark — and he was generating interest right up until the time he decided a TV show was more important than the country. We are now in the 2016 general election season and Mr. Trump is again making politically incorrect statements that are again right on the mark. Is this all for publicity? Is Mr. Trump just a really rich guy looking for excitement? If he is not sincere about a presidential run I wish he would stop confusing the issue.

Dolezal flap a pride issue

Rachel Dolezal's long-running deception was a bad thing done by a woman who has clearly lost her real identity ("Rachel Dolezal, Spokane NAACP president, steps down amid race backlash," Web, June 15).