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Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

Tim Kaine (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A sad tale of two disposable veeps

- The Washington Times

A governor is always a good choice for a vice president. He (or she) has learned how to run an administration, how to work with a cranky legislature and understands staying close to the people who elected him. There’s no Praetorian guard to keep him separated from the people.

Illustration on the history of the Democratic Party convention by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unconventional Democrats

It’s Democratic convention time, and while this year’s shindig may not be anything to write home about, the confabs in the old days were knock-down, drag-out affairs. For example, it took nine ballots to nominate James K. Polk in 1844; 49 for Franklin Pierce in 1852, 17 for James Buchanan in 1856, and 22 for Horatio Seymour in 1868.

Illustration on leveraging U.S. visas against China's territorial aggression in the South China Sea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Reversing China’s South China Sea grab

The South China Sea (SCS) is currently the focus of a dispute between the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei. The PRC has preemptively deployed military personnel and equipment to enforce their claims to a trumped-up, self-identified but unrecognized “nine-dash line,” an imagined boundary that is inconsistent with international law and commonly accepted international behavior.

Illustration on all terrain powered wheelchairs for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wheelchairs for veterans

Many Americans are familiar with the military creed of never leaving a fallen comrade behind, a commitment that has served as the real-life inspiration for Hollywood movies chronicling daring rescue operations under impossible odds of injured or captured service members.

In-Activist Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to defeat activists

This month, Congress passed a bill requiring all genetically improved foods to be labeled. But it’s essentially meaningless. Genetically improved foods are just as safe as the veggies in a backyard garden, and virtually all foods — organic or not — have been genetically improved at some point in their history.

Illustration on the stagnation of the Democrat party by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The late, great Democratic Party

This week the Democrats officially coronate the battered Hillary Clinton as the torch bearer for the party. She has slouched to the finish line. She is tired and the country is tired of her. Sorry, Democrats, no do-overs. You’re stuck with her.

EPA Smog Test on Humans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The EPA’s secret whitewash

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is trying to use the prestigious National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to cover-up the agency’s illegal science experiments on humans.

No Troops to Poland Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama must not send troops to Poland

This month, the Obama administration announced it would send 1,000 troops to Poland on a regular rotation as part of ongoing efforts to shore up the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO’s) Eastern flank. These American troops, said President Obama, will “serve shoulder to shoulder with Polish soldiers” to help out one of our country’s “most committed and important allies.”

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BOOK REVIEW: 'Ghost Sniper: A Sniper Elite Novel'

With the take-down of Osama bin Laden, the most wanted man in the world, and other bold and brave military actions, the U.S. Navy SEALs and other special operations groups are respected and admired greatly. Although the elite special operators perform in a high state of operational security and secrecy, much has been written about them, as the public is very interested in these seemingly larger-than-life military men.

Washington Nationals manager Dusty Baker (12) signs for fans before a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Saturday, July 2, 2016, in Washington. The Reds won 9-4 in ten innings. (AP Photo/Nick Wass) **FILE**

D.C. sports fans don't need to prove anything

The Nationals crowd, as well as the team, is now being graded about how they will perform the rest of the season. Nationals manager Dusty Baker indicated while they watch a first-place team, the home crowd isn't exactly in first place.

Illustration on the myth of free college by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The pipe dream that is 'free college'

Hillary Clinton's plan to make college free for low- and middle-income families does not address the most fundamental challenges in higher education. No matter who pays, universities have become costly and wasteful and do a poor job of equipping young people to earn a living.

Illustration on Soros funded radical organizations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beware the Soros zombies

Billionaire George Soros has funded liberal organizations intent on bringing confusion, disarray and trouble to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland next week.

Gen. David Petraeus. ** File (Associated Press)

Why Obama must pardon Gen. David Petraeus

Anyone who served in the military understands the underlying principle of getting the bottom line up front. Because in a war zone there is always a chance the "messenger" might not get to complete their report or dispatch due to hostile fire.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Hampton, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Mortal wounds for TPP

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP in the jargon of the trade negotiators, looks dead. The cosmeticians at the mortuary say so. Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are competing to preside over the funeral but U.S. Trade Ambassador Michael Froman says he and his colleagues are hearing encouraging noises from various members of Congress. He thinks that the deal may soon move forward.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during the Innovation Showcase, Thursday, July 14, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

The Pence choice

Unless he changed his mind overnight -- and "Surprise" and "Unpredictability" are his middle names -- Donald Trump finally picked his running mate and by all accounts it's a good one. Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana is the real goods.

School choice means innovation

Israel Teitelbaum (and many others) miss the boat when they focus on liberty and "freedom to choose" as the key justification for charter schools, vouchers and the Education Freedom Accounts Act ("'A Republic — if you can keep it,'" Web, July 12).

Trump's no dunce

Wesley Pruden's comment that there is "ample evidence that the Donald is an uneducated lout" reminds me of Clark Clifford's remark that President Ronald Reagan was an "amiable dunce" ("The election to terrify us all," Web, July 11).

Cleveland Browns running back Isaiah Crowell apologized for posting a graphic on Instagram that depicts the brutal killing of a police officer. (Associated Press)

Isaiah Crowell, Minnesota Lynx actions show sports, society continue to collide

Sports take place in such public arenas (literally), it's unrealistic to think everyone will get along and play nice without the threat of uniformed, armed police officers on hand. It's also unrealistic to expect lockstep-thinking and behavior from the athletes. They have a platform and some will use it to express their opinions, no matter how they might conflict with your or anyone else's thoughts.

Vilifying officers endangers lives

Police actions in Ferguson, Mo., New York, Baltimore, Baton Rouge, La., and Minnesota have been in the news, and a few police officers have been seen using excessive force and shooting people. I believe a small number of police officers use excessive force, and these officers should be held accountable for their actions. However, the vast majority of police officers diligently do their duty and treat criminals and suspects fairly.

Illustration on the court's reaffirmation of Fourth Amendment rights by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A slapdown of civil asset forfeiture

David, meet Goliath. Incredibly enough, a small-town Maryland dairy farmer and his wife just won their legal claim against the Internal Revenue Service and Department of Justice and will now be able to recoup tens of thousands of dollars seized in what turned out to be an unconstitutional application of civil asset forfeiture.

Ginsburg's constitution contempt

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's disdain for the political process parallels her contempt for the U.S. Constitution ("Donald Trump on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: 'Her mind is shot -- resign,'" Web, July 13).

Maggie Kiser, 2, waves a flag as she is pulled along by her grandfather, Gary White, during the Amarillo Street Neighborhood Parade in Abilene, Texas, Monday, July 4, 2016. (Tommy Metthe/The Abilene Reporter-News via AP)

Redefining patriotism

Patriots proliferate on the Fourth of July, with the red, white and blue all around. But after the fireworks fade from the night sky the Stars and Stripes are often relegated to the back of the hall closet. In 2016, so the pollsters find, many are not so proud to be Americans.

The lady who talks too much

Ruth Bader Ginsburg has always had difficulty getting over herself. She has opinions on many things, and when she's not speaking ex-cathedra, as it were, she's eager to express those opinions elsewhere, as if the public were waiting breathlessly for them. Lately she has even been forgetting her place.

Illustration on the future of robot policing by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Robots join the thin blue line

The surreal fact in the human tragedy in Dallas is that the evil sniper who slew five police officers was not finally killed by a fellow officer, but by a mechanical robot. This conjures science fiction images of killer robots deployed against man. It's not altogether reassuring.

Illustration on Mexican meth and violent crime in Texas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tracing Mexican meth to the Dallas cop killer

In all likelihood, Dallas police killer Micah Johnson was an amphetamine addict. On July 9, quoting Dallas police sources, Fox reported that meth had been found in a search of the home he shared with his mother.

Illustration on Ambassador Scott Gration's use of a non-government server by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton beats the rap while condemning others to face it

- The Washington Times

As he methodically laid out the case against Hillary Clinton for her use of a private, unsecure server and email accounts to carry out all of her official government business as secretary of state before declining to recommend criminal charges, FBI Director James Comey left out one major piece of evidence.