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Illustration on excessive government regulation of oil by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Opening the tap for crude-oil exports

Not many years ago, the idea of “peak oil” was all the rage. The concept, first identified in 1956 by M. King Hubbert, a geologist working for Shell Oil, held that there was a finite amount of oil in the ground and that oil production would peak in the 1970s and then decline.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

D.C. charter schools deserve equal funding

As Washington gets ready to select a new mayor, D.C. voters should insist that to get their vote, a candidate should pledge to provide all students in the District equitable treatment when it comes to school funding.

Illustration on Ron Klain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Treating Ebola with politics

When the then-spreading Ebola virus threatened our nation last week, President Obama put one man in charge of coordinating the government’s response who had zero experience in handling infectious diseases.

Illustration on free trade and government restrictions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Free-trade superstitions

What’s it like being a free-market advocate in the 21st century? I think it can be summarized as follows: Another day, another dollar — and another attack on capitalism.

Pope Francis waves as he leaves after he celebrated the beatification ceremony of Pope Paul VI, and a mass for the closing of of a two-week synod on family issues, in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican,  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

The price of papal popularity

Normally a synod of Catholic bishops does not provide fireworks rivaling the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, where Mayor Richard Daley’s boys in blue ran up the score on the radicals in Grant Park.

Seal of the Just Us Department Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A post-Holder Justice Department worthy of the name

Watergate-era misconduct and politicization at the Department of Justice shattered public trust in a once-venerated institution by 1975. The urgent task of restoring Justice fell to Edward H. Levi.

Senate candidate Bruce Braley, right,  campaigns with  U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in an Iowa Votes rally in Des Moines  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at the Hotel Fort Des Moines . (AP Photo/The Des Moines Register, Rodney White)  MAGS OUT, TV OUT, NO SALES, MANDATORY CREDIT

It was a dark and stormy Democratic night

- The Washington Times

This is the week the political world, like the worm, begins to turn. The polls, the hunches, the guesses and the vibes that only junkies feel all say it’s a Republican year and Harry Reid will soon take a seat on the back bench.

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North Korea Human Rights Violations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ending North Korea's human rights violations

In her keynote address to the United Nations General Assembly last month, South Korean President Park Geun-hye sought support for Korean reunification by highlighting that 2014 is the 25th anniversary of the dismantling of the Berlin Wall.

Texas Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis appears at a press conference on October 13, 2014 to defend her controversial "wheelchair" ad against opponent Greg Abbott (screenshot via The Daily Caller).

Wendy Davis undermines her argument in wheelchair ad defense

- The Washington Times

Wendy Davis, the Democrat running for governor in Texas, is under fire for a campaign ad focused on her Republican opponent Greg Abbott's partial paralysis. She's sticking by the advertisement, but her damage control efforts showcase either hypocrisy or a disturbing lack of self-awareness.

Illustration on Democrats seeking to distance themselves from Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Avoiding the Obama virus on the campaign trail

- The Washington Times

The Democratic Senate candidate in Kentucky refuses to even say she voted for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. Democratic senators running for re-election in New Hampshire and North Carolina tell reporters they don't want their party's president to campaign for them.

BOOK REVIEW: 'World Order'

In "World Order," Henry Kissinger writes, "Success in such an effort will require an approach that respects both the multifariousness of the human condition and the ingrained human quest for freedom.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Give rural areas school choice

David Sherfinski accurately describes shifting allegiances that might seem frustrating for school-choice advocates, as inner-city Democrats increasingly favor parental choice among a range of public-private options while rural Republicans, failing to see much benefit from choice for their far-flung constituencies, vote to stifle promising initiatives ("Inner-city Democrats warm to school choice as rural Republicans balk," Web, Oct. 6).

BOOK REVIEW: 'Blood on the Water'

Almost 200 men, women and children die when a bomb explodes on the pleasure boat Princess Mary as it floats down the Thames on a summer evening in 19th-century London.

George Will (Associated Press) **FILE**

EDITORIAL: The academic mob silences free speech, again

Scripps College, an all-female school in Claremont, Calif., founded on the principle that "the paramount obligation of a college is to develop in its students the ability to think clearly and independently," last week revoked an invitation to conservative newspaper columnist George Will to speak to students because its administrators were offended by his rigorous math.