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(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Barack Obama, you’re no Ronald Reagan’

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that ” where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be.”

Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Peace Through Strength Bunker Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reviving ‘peace through strength’

Ever since the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamist storm troops took over Iran in 1979, the driving force of the country’s rulers has been (1) destroy Israel; (2) establish Iran as the hegemonist of the Middle East; and (3) drive out all Western influences from the region. Their efforts to create a nuclear arsenal has been part of their strategy to accomplish these goals.

Illustration on the controversy stirred during the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Surviving ‘a perfect storm’ of opposition

Just two months ago, the nation marked the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, and many of the stories in the media were illustrated with images of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall, which over the past three decades has become an American cultural icon — symbolizing that difficult period in our history. Yet, that memorial, as we know it today, almost didn’t happen.

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Daly Simmons, 26, sits as she prays in front of a makeshift memorial outside the Armed Forces Career Center Saturday, July 18, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn.    Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez, of Hixson, Tenn., attacked two military facilities on Thursday, in a shooting rampage that killed four Marines and one U.S. Navy sailor.  (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

A call to arms

Chattanooga joins Fort Hood and Little Rock as indictments of the continuing failure of the nation's strategy for eliminating the threat of Islamic terrorism. The man entrusted with the responsibility for keeping America safe won't even call the threat by its right name. Hint: It's not "workplace violence."

Dinesh D'Souza. ** FILE **

The deprogramming of Dinesh D'Souza

Arrogance is ugly wherever found, and it's particularly ugly in a judge with the power to deprive a man of his freedom. Dinesh D'Souza is an author, filmmaker and onetime college president who was convicted of violating campaign finance law.

Hillary Clinton's shifting identity

Hillary Clinton's political decolletage has remained modest even as her chief rival for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, Bernie Sanders, lets it all hang out ("Hillary Clinton's identity crisis confuses followers," Web, July 16). Hillary's apologists, water-carriers, flacks, advisers, spinners and hangers-on apparently approved revealing something more in her economic policy address, although perhaps she should have maintained the mystery.

Mutual Dislike for Common Core Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tracking bipartisan opposition to Common Core

Last week a bipartisan Senate majority voted to reauthorize and update the Bush era "No Child Left Behind" legislation that has been used by the Obama administration to essentially force the states to adopt controversial federally mandated "Common Core" curriculum requirements. The Senate bill gives states the right to opt out of Common Core and even stronger language was included earlier in a House-passed version of the reauthorization.

Moore Chart to accompany article that appears July 20, 2015

America's government debt bomb

I'm asked every day if America is the next Greece or Detroit or Puerto Rico -- and the answer is an unequivocal no. The U.S. economy -- especially the private sector -- is structurally very healthy. That wasn't the case on the eve of the great financial meltdown of 2008 when American companies and households were leveraged up to their eyebrows.

Illustration on the Kurds as an effective foe to ISIS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Arming the Kurds to defeat ISIS

In the Game of Thrones in Mesopotamia, the scenario is as Byzantine as it gets, and Team Obama is handling a complex diplomatic and military challenge, with the lives of millions of civilians and combatants in the balance.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Muse'

When a writer who has spent his entire life in the publishing business sits down to write his first novel, what does he write about? Well, that was easy -- publishing, of course.

Illustration on the parameters of televised presidential debates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Striking a balance in televised presidential debates

Increasingly, countries all over the world -- particularly emerging democracies -- are making leaders' debates a part of their electoral processes. In large part, these debates have been inspired by the United States' general election presidential debates, which are carried live on major television networks worldwide.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's changing directions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary's identity crisis

Hillary Clinton's schizophrenic policy positions were on full display at her Monday speech in New York where she laid out her economic platform.

Slippery sentence-commutation slope

I think President Obama's idea to commute the sentences of 46 drug offenders was a good one, but I also think it will create a slippery-slope effect in which people who have been sentenced for other crimes using federal mandatory minimum guidelines will also seek to have their sentences commuted.

President Barack Obama speaks in the Choctaw Nation on economic opportunities for underprivileged communities across the nation, on Wednesday, July 15, 2015, in Durant, Okla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Obama's hissy fit

There is not a lot to love in President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran, despite the attempted assurances in his what's-not-to-like press conference on Wednesday. In addition to the near-unanimous doubts about his "air-tight verification" promises, which he insists make a nuclear arms race in the Middle East less likely, a short list of what's wrong with the deal must include the names of four Americans: Jason Rezaian, Saeed Abedini, Amir Hekmati and Robert Levinson. They're American hostages in Iran, and they just lost their best chance for freedom. Mr. Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry apparently "forgot" to press for their release.

John Kerry     Associated Press photo

The leaking rancid details of the surrender to Iran

- The Washington Times

Reality is moving in on Barack Obama and the gang that can't shoot straight. The sun shines bright and the mice won't find a dark place to hide. The president continues to celebrate the remarkably awful deal he cut with Iran, but the rank and rancid details continue to leak, like something from a neighbor's overflowing toilet upstairs.