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Wising up to the Democrats’ war on women

In June, Rep. Cory Gardner, Colorado Republican, told a roomful of friends at a Cory Gardner for Senate get-together that he was surprised to see his Democratic opponent, Mark Udall, running ads accusing him of banning birth control — since he had just picked up his wife’s birth-control pills. Everybody laughed.

Face-to-face with an evil enemy

There can be only one response to the barbaric beheading of American journalist James Foley by Islamic State terrorists. We must hunt them down and kill them.

Remembering Washington in flames

The most famous firestorm to strike Washington, D.C., took place 200 years ago, when an uninvited, uniformed guest plopped into the speaker’s chair in the U.S. Capitol’s House of Representatives chamber on Aug. 24, 1814.

CORRECTS DATE - President Barack Obama, right, smiles as he and former NBA basketball player Alonzo Mourning, left, prepare to ride in a golf cart while golfing at Vineyard Golf Club in Edgartown, Mass., on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. Obama is taking a two-week summer vacation on the island. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

The Obama tee party

Trouble in the St. Louis suburbs has rescued President Obama’s vacation. He can play all 18 holes at the country club now, safe in the knowledge that he’s distracting voters from all the scandals, mismanagement and foreign and domestic policies that are the legacy of his administration.

FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2012 file photo, former Vice President Al Gore, Current TV Chairman and Co-Founder, participates in the Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour in Pasadena , Calif. Former Vice President Al Gore is suing Al Jazeera America, saying the news network is withholding tens of millions of dollars that it owes for buying Current TV from him and other shareholders for $500 million last year. (AP Photo/Danny Moloshok, File)

EDITORIAL: Al Gore vs. Al-Jazeera

How do you say “buyer’s remorse” in Arabic? The Qatari royal family likely feels the pangs of regret for paying the princely sum of $500 million to Al Gore and friends to give Al-Jazeera America a slot on satellite-TV and cable channels.

Bogart and Bacall in "To Have and Have Not."

‘Death be not proud’

Robin Williams and Lauren Bacall join this year’s roster of celebrity deaths. Their names and fame preoccupy us in public mourning, though most of us were no closer to them in life than to a movie or television screen.

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IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR SCHOLASTIC INC AND LOS ANGELES UNIVERSAL PRESCHOOL (LAUP) - New York City Mayor, Bill de Blasio, addresses the country's first PreK Nation at the Scholastic Inc. headquarters in Soho, on Tuesday, August 5, 2014 in New York. The PreK Nation Summit advocates to increase access to quality preschool for all children. (Photo by Stuart Ramson/Invision for Scholastic Inc and Los Angeles Universal Preschool (LAUP)/AP Images)

Attacking achievement in New York City

New York's mayor, Bill de Blasio, like so many others who call themselves "progressive," is gung-ho to solve social problems.

Anti-Semitism in Hungary Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democracy's dangerous descent in Hungary

The famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal often said, "Where democracy is strong, it is good for Jews; where it is weak, it is bad for Jews." Today, 100,000 Jews in Hungary are worried about their future.

Illustration on the effect of high corporate taxes by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

The patriotism of prosperity

A few weeks ago, it was quite revealing — but not surprising — to hear Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew imply that corporate America should willingly pay the highest corporate-tax rates in the world as part of its "patriotic" duty.

Illustration on Obama's fading popularity by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Democrats feel a fall in the air

President Obama is on a two-week vacation in Martha's Vineyard, as wars rage across the Middle East and Ukraine, terrorists threaten to topple Iraq, and Republicans are on the brink of capturing the Senate.

Muneer Awad, Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations - Oklahoma Chapter, left, answers questions during a news conference concerning a recently passed Oklahoma ballot measure prohibiting state courts from considering international law or Islamic law when deciding cases, in Oklahoma City, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010. At right is Imad Enchassi, Imam - Islamic Society of Greater Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

EDITORIAL: Where is Muslim outrage?

Khaled Sharrouf and a buddy were arrested in Australia in 2007 for making bombs to use against civilians in Melbourne and Sydney. They pleaded guilty and were sentenced to four years in prison for "terrorist activity."

The New York headquarters of ratings agency Standard & Poor's is pictured in 2011. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: It's not inequality, stupid

Decrying income inequality is growing more popular with the shrill voices on the left as their policy nostrums, including the stimulus that didn't stimulate, have left crippled the economy, with more than 40 million Americans looking for jobs.

GOP and Healthcare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Republicans can win on health care

This should be a banner year for the Republican Party. Democrats are stuck with health care reform that most people don't like.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks to guests before President Barack Obama offers a toast at a dinner for the U.S. Africa Leaders Summit, on the South Lawn of the White House,Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. African heads of state are gathering in Washington for an unprecedented summit to promote business development. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

De Blasio’s reign of error

No one likes to hear these four little words: "We told you so." When it comes to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's political agenda, though, many of us told you so.

Capitol Hill staffer Tonya Williams of Washington, D.C. plays with her newborn pug on the east side of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

60 percent of Americans don't trust the federal government with their 'personal information'

- The Washington Times

Maybe it can be blamed on alarming media coverage, maybe not. A new Harris poll finds it can be tough to trust anyone with your personal information these days. Harris finds that 60 percent of Americans don't trust the federal government to handle their information confidentially and securely - a sentiment that has grown by eight percentage points in the past year alone.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Blue-Eyed Boy'

Some nurses called him "The Burn" after he was hideously wounded in a landmine explosion in Vietnam four decades ago.

President Barack Obama speaks about developments in Iraq, Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, from Chilmark, Mass., during his family vacation on the island of Martha's Vineyard. Obama is giving his approval to the appointment of a prime minister to replace Nouri al-Maliki and urging the formation of a new government in Iraq as soon as possible. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Pointing the presidential finger over Iraq

- The Washington Times

President Obama can't help himself. Even as he ordered airstrikes on the Islamic State forces in Iraq threatening to starve, shoot or behead as many as 50,000 refugees trapped on a mountaintop, he had to try to assure the world, his fellow citizens and perhaps, most importantly, himself that the mess wasn't his fault.

JACK KEMP-former professional football player, was a Republican who he served as Housing Secretary in the administration of President George H. W. Bush. He previously served nine terms as a congressman for Western New York's 31st congressional district from 1971 to 1989. He was the Republican Party's nominee for Vice President in the 1996 election, where he was the running mate of presidential nominee Bob Dole. FILE - In this Aug. 25, 2006 file photo, Jack Kemp speaks during a news conference at the Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Kemp, the ex-quarterback, congressman, one-time vice-presidential nominee and self-described "bleeding-heart conservative" died Saturday, May 2, 2009. (AP Photo/Rogelio Solis, File)

A tale of two tax problems

Thirty-three years ago this month, President Reagan picked up his executive signing pen and affixed his name to one of the most sweeping pieces of tax legislation in U.S. history: the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981.