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A refugee’s tale of Thanksgiving

As I grew up in America, I came to realize that the most effective antidote for fear is not courage, but gratitude.

Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France — and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel — have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks — and that seems unlikely.

The Approval of Technical Wrong Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the gun-ignorant make gun laws

When the state of Maryland quietly killed off its 15-year, $5 million social experiment in gun control — so-called “ballistic fingerprinting” — it served up the latest example of people who know nothing about firearms making technical laws about guns. The news of this latest failure (not a single crime solved in 15 years) followed New York shutting down a similar program, and it generated from gun owners and gun makers a tired “We told you so.”

MS St. Louis, 1939. The Voyage of Doom.

Stopping the next Holocaust

By now, in the days following the Paris massacre and the Brussels lockdown, many Americans have been reminded of the awful fate of the S.S. Saint Louis. In 1939, fleeing the impending doom of the Holocaust, some 900 Jews boarded the cruise ship in Hamburg, Germany, and crossed the Atlantic.

NATO Safe Area for Refugees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Responding to humanitarian catastrophe

The international community just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Accords, a landmark peace agreement that brought an end to the Bosnian War and a grave humanitarian crisis in the Balkans.

Illustration on the need for streamlines conceal carry permits in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/the Washington Times

Fighting ISIS with concealed carry

Following the recent Paris attacks, the Islamic State recently announced its intention to “strike America at its center,” in Washington, D.C. Our response should be swift and decisive.

Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon           Associated Press photo

A military witch hunt that almost succeeded

Along with many Americans, I salute The Washington Times for having the courage to not only report on the Air Force general court martial persecution-prosecution of Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon, but to continue following this case with a series of updates from the courtroom trial in Minot, N.D., until the court martial concluded on Nov. 14.

Former President George W. Bush speaks at the George W. Bush Institute at Southern Methodist University in Dallas on Feb. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

How Obama cooks the terrorism numbers

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has given an eloquent testimony to a Christian faith, but his sympathies are always with Islam. He insisted from Asia that “99.9 percent of Muslims worldwide reject terrorism,” and that’s good news, if true. But it clearly is not.

Persecution of Christians by Muslims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No Christians and persecuted minorities allowed

Standing before the cameras in Turkey, President Obama found his safe place to indict half his countrymen for raising the issue of religion in their concern over his plan to open America’s gates to tens of thousands of Muslim “refugees” from Syria. Subjecting refugees to a religious test runs counter to American values, said Mr. Obama.

Black-eye Friday Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Wal-Mart’s protests won’t sell

For most Americans, Black Friday is the time to shop around for great deals on new Christmas gifts. For Big Labor, it’s an opportunity to steal the headlines and advance its agenda.

An Israeli policeman collects evidence next to a body of a Palestinian attacker at a West Bank petrol station near Jerusalem, Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. A Palestinian stabbed an Israeli man to death before he was shot dead by security forces. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

Where terror lurks every day

Think back to October 2002, when the Beltway sniper and his young accomplice paralyzed the Washington region for three weeks, sowing fear and keeping people from pumping gas, buying groceries, holding soccer practices or venturing from their homes. Ponder what just happened in Paris.

Illustration on President Obama, the tortured genius by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

President Obama, a ‘tortured genius’

A U.S. Navy SEAL teammate and friend once described the worst type of leader as a “tortured genius.” By this, he did not mean the artist or musician suffering from inspired hysteria, but someone who, no matter how obvious the failing or how fair and valid the criticism, accepts no blame and denies all responsibility. In the mind of such a leader, the rest of the world simply can’t see the “genius” in what they do.

Confused about the enemy

Since the horrific Paris terror attacks, President Obama and the Democrats want you to think that defending ourselves from Islamic terrorism will only make things worse. Bombing the Islamic State, you see, will make it easier for them to recruit.

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Illustration on China's aggressive moves in the South China Sea by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Erasing a line in the South China Sea

It's too early for the Philippines to take any victory laps over the recent Hague international tribunal ruling regarding claims filed against China over disputed areas in the South China Sea.

Illustration on the impact of Obama's Clean Power Act on Texas' electric power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The dirty business of 'clean power'

Access to affordable and reliable electricity is about more than being able to turn on your lights when you get home from work. We need it to power our schools, supermarkets, hospitals, offices, manufacturing plants and airports. But like all things in life, electricity isn't free.

Charge pollution 'dividend'

Thank you for the great Nov. 4 op-ed "Why conservatives should set a price on carbon pollution" (Web) pointing out that we need to take a market-based approach to energy. Right now the political clout of fossil fuel-corporations gets them massive government subsidies and we socialize the costs of carbon pollution.

Continue aid to Israel

The first step in talking about the situation in Israel should be to correct any misconceptions relating to the current Arab-Israeli conflict ("Obama, Netanyahu to discuss U.S. military aid to Israel," Web, Nov. 8).

President Obama. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Bordering on lawlessness

The Constitution matters. The much-abused document on which the republic stands has been rescued from the trash bin where President Obama threw it, and still stands between the government and his "progressive" goal of using a flood of illegal immigrants to build a permanent "progressive" majority. The reprieve is welcome but Mr. Obama has not learned much.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter speaks during a news conference at the Pentagon, Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) ** FILE **

Nuances ride again

How quickly Washington forgets that Ronald Reagan's forthright stand against Soviet totalitarianism and the tyranny of Communist China was the object of derision at the time. The elites sniffed and scoffed at the cowboy president. He was so unsophisticated. The late Clark Clifford, expensive lawyer, fixer and tutor of the elites, called him "an amiable dunce."

Illustration on thecorruption of the justice system by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Punishing the Obama way

Although the rot has been visible for some time, recent actions by President Obama's Department of Justice and director of national intelligence make it possible to say definitively that the United States we once extolled as a nation of laws and not of men no longer exists.

Executive Crook Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being an executive is not a crime

Here's a quiz: Which of the following is a federal crime: (a) A hamster dealer needlessly tilting a hamster's cage while in transit; (b) subliminally advertising wine; or (c) selling a fresh steak with paprika on it?

Illustration on the court reversals of Obama's overstepping his authority under the Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The president and the rule of law

Earlier this week, a federal appeals court in New Orleans upheld an injunction issued by a federal district court in Texas against the federal government, thereby preventing it from implementing President Obama's executive orders on immigration.

Illustration on students' entitlement mentality on college campuses by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The closing of the American mouth

College kids do the darndest things. You send them away to open up their minds and they learn to close them, for themselves and for others. The tantrum generation just managed a left-wing coup at the University of Missouri, stifling freedom of expression and forcing out the president and chancellor of the university.

Rotten to the Core Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Common Core's double whammy

Some of the most reliable yardsticks in monitoring academic progress in K-12 education are the assessments known as the Nation's Report Card, officially the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The results from its 2015 assessments are in, and they are not encouraging.

Historic Defense Dept. image of a Dust Off air evacuation crew in action during the Vietnam War. The primary transport was the The Bell UH-1 Iroquois "Huey" helicopter - the air ambulance.

Hooah: Vietnam-era 'Dustoff' air ambulance crews nominated for Congressional Gold Medal

- The Washington Times

Sens. John Cornyn and Joe Manchin have introduced legislation to award an elite group of Vietnam veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal. That would be the tenacious "Dust Off" crews, who drew their name from the U.S. Army 57th Medical Detachment's radio call sign and fearlessly flew unarmed air ambulances into combat to rescue and evacuate the wounded. Their airborne mission has roots dating back to World War II.