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EDITORIAL: Why militarize the schools?

But peer pressure, bullying and ambition for good grades aren’t the sort of minefield California’s schools apparently fear most. They’re getting ready for the real thing, deploying mine-resistant vehicles, or MRAPs, against the day an invading army lays a booby trap on the playground.

Illustration on the difficult U.S. position vs. the Islamic State by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Creeping toward war, confused and unprepared

In their testimony before Congress, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey said unequivocally that we are at war with the Islamic State (aka ISIS) in both Iraq and Syria.

The home of Ana Maria and John Conley is pictured in Arvada, Colo., on Thursday, July 3, 2014, is where their daughter Shannon Maureen Conley, 19, lived until her arrest by the FBI in April. FBI agents tried more than once to discourage  Conley, who said she was intent on waging jihad in the Middle East before arresting her in April as she boarded a flight she hoped would ultimately get her to Syria, court documents unsealed Wednesday show.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

The spread of Rocky Mountain jihad

In my adopted home state, the toxic fumes of Islamic jihad have penetrated the most unlikely hamlets and hinterlands.

**FILE** Sen. Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, addresses a crowd during the Utah Republican Party nominating convention, in Sandy, Utah, on April 26, 2014. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: The monument man, by executive order

The federal government already owns most of the land in Utah, and Mr. Obama has his eye on a prime parcel of 1.4 million acres near the Canyonlands National Park. With a wave of his autopen, he can banish development, declaring the Greater Canyonlands a “national monument.”

Illustration on "late speaker" children by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When children are late-talkers

Anyone who knows what anxiety, and sometimes anguish, parents go through when they have a child who is still not talking at age two, three or even four, can appreciate what a blessing it can be to have someone who can tell them what to do — and what not to do.

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Illustration on Obama's goals to diminish the United States on the world stage by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Is Obama a success or failure?

Those people who say that President Obama has no clear vision and no clear strategy for dealing with the terrorists of the Islamic State in the Middle East may be mistaken.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: McDonnell conviction was deserved

In determining who would be his running mate in 2012, Mitt Romney gave serious consideration to then-Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell. In light of McDonnell's conviction for multiple counts of corruption, it is chilling to recognize that had things turned out differently our vice president might have been this tainted man.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Prime Minister's Ironing Board and Other State Secrets'

We owe this delightful political potpourri to the famous — or infamous, depending on your perspective — "30-year-old" British rule, which for much of the past century kept locked up even the most innocuous government documents for three full decades.

A MQ-9 Reaper, armed with GBU-12 Paveway II laser guided munitions and AGM-114 Hellfire missiles, is piloted by Col. Lex Turner during a mission over southern Afghanistan. (USAF via Associated Press)

Other nations back U.S. airstrikes in Iraq, oppose taking part themselves

- The Washington Times

Well, at least it's a sign that American air power, know how and guts still has respect and approval overseas. A new YouGov survey finds that majorities of European allies of the U.S. are just fine with air strikes on Iraq - as long as it's the U.S. that is doing the striking. Reactions to the findings ranged from annoyance to sarcasm.

Illustration on Obama's "anti-Bushism" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama the anti-Bush

It may come as a surprise to President Obama, but he has actually proved that when it comes to foreign policy and the war on terrorism, President George W. Bush and America have been right all along.

Wary Americans: Only 22 percent say the economy is going to improve

- The Washington Times

Yes, about that U.S. economy: Wary Americans remain in a defensive posture when it comes to their pocketbooks, and for good reason. A majority still have some serious financial issues, with only 22 percent feeling confident that the economy will improve - with Democrats more hopeful than their Republican counterparts.

Illustration on Russia's incursion into Ukraine by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

Russia's costly Ukrainian conquest

A cease-fire is now in effect between the Ukrainian government and the Russian-directed separatist movement occupying parts of two Ukrainian provinces and Crimea. Few expect it to last because neither side is ready to live with the status quo.

Illustration on the continuing burdens of Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obamacare repairs that never end

The nonpartisan Government Accountability Office (GAO) places the responsibility for the cost overruns with the Obama administration.

In this Sept. 6, 2014 image released by NBC, Chuck Todd, left, speaks with President Barack Obama prior to an interview for "Meet the Press" at the White House in Washington. Todd debuted as moderator of NBC's "Meet the Press," Sunday, Sept. 7, bringing a low-key style and surrounding himself with fellow pundits as NBC turns to him to erase a slide that has taken the long-running Sunday morning political affairs program from first to third in the ratings. (AP Photo/NBC, William B. Plowman)

When presidential boredom is not an option

- The Washington Times

President Obama's hair, like the locks of most of the presidents in their second terms, has turned white. He says he doesn't get enough sleep, but he's nevertheless energized, not exhausted. Bored is more like it.

U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan takes questions from a panel of reporters, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014, at the Rotary Club of Milwaukee. Ryan blamed the Obama administration for contributing to the circumstances that led to the swift ascent of the Islamic State, a militant group that purportedly beheaded a second American journalist in two weeks. (AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde)

A society sickened by welfare

Congress has returned to Washington, but not for long. The looming midterm elections mean that lawmakers are here only for what USA Today calls "a three-week sprint" before they're back out to campaign.