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Illustration on Bill Cosby by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Cosby’s message survives personal disaster

What’s fascinating about the coverage of the persuasive accusations against Bill Cosby, now 18 and rising, is that race doesn’t dominate. There’s an outcry at the abuse of women, and he’s shredded the healthy black-father family man image he carefully cultivated on his sitcom, but you don’t read or hear notice taken of the fact that the women who say he drugged and raped them were usually white.

John Winthrop Portrait

The truly first Thanksgiving

What sustained both Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay was that, thankfully, America could be carved into a better community for all, providing that elusive but mysterious challenge that was missing from the lives of so many in England.

Death of the Sexual Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The joy of sex is over

So this is how the sexual revolution is ending. It is ending with gangs of angry women recalling alleged sexual assaults up to a half-century ago. Their alleged assailant in this case is the avuncular 77-year-old Bill Cosby.

illustration on the values of life and government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Our gratitude belongs not to government, but to God

What if the government is designed to perpetuate itself? What if the real levers of governmental power are pulled by agents, diplomats and bureaucrats behind the scenes? What if they stay in power no matter who is elected president or which major political party controls Congress?

Illegal Aliens and Illegal Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama has forgotten his official duty is to Americans

Like millions of other Americans, I appreciate the plight of billions of people throughout the world who would like nothing more than to find themselves in the United States, where they could enjoy a much higher standard of living and wonderful opportunities for advancement. It should first be considered, however, that we have millions of people already mired in dire poverty.

Illustration on the negative impact of Obama's immigration action on black Americans by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Black voters for Obama get nothing but disrespect

- The Washington Times

President Obama discounted November’s election results because turnout is lower in midterm than in presidential elections, but there is reason to believe that his treatment of his base contributed to the decision of many Democrats to not bother going to the polls in what everyone recognized as a crucial election.

Ghost Town Soldier Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s sentinels have gone home

Josef Stalin, when asked in 1935 whether he could do anything with Russian Catholics to help win favor with the pope against the increasing Nazi threat, famously responded: “How many divisions has he got?”

Illustration on Middle East violence by Julius/Horsens Folkeblad, Horsens, Denmark

Slaughter in the synagogue

Executioners for the Islamic State use knives to cut the throats of Christians, Yazidis and “apostate” Muslims. Palestinian executioners last week used knives and a meat cleaver to slaughter Jewish worshippers at a synagogue in West Jerusalem.

FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2013, file photo, a giant Uncle Sam balloon is marched down Sixth Avenue during the 87th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York. Helium makes the huge balloons in the parade sail high above the crowd. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

The covetousness crisis

The devastating effects of America’s covet-driven culture.

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Sen. Barry Goldwater rallied a new conservative generation during his presidential campaign in 1964. Although he lost that contest, his landmark philosophies of conservatism still echo a half-century later. As Goldwater's son, Barry Goldwater Jr., reminds us, conservatives must present positive answers to national problems, not just condemn them. (Associated Press)

The father of American conservatism

A half-century ago, Sen. Barry Goldwater strode to the podium of the Republican National Convention in San Francisco to accept his party's presidential nomination. He declared, "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vise." Let me remind you further: "Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue."

Jonathan Gruber poses in his home in Lexington, Mass., in this Feb. 8, 2011, file photo. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

The stupidity of 'experts'

The only surprising thing about Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber's revelations that the legislation was based on a series of lies and voter stupidity was that Mr. Gruber was so stupid to think no one would see the videos of him saying so.

Illustration on  targeting the Washington Redskins' name by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Redskins' — for want of a politically correct name

Congressional Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, who represents the District of Columbia, has introduced a bill (H.R. 5690) that would deny federal tax-exempt status to any professional sports league that promotes the use of the term "Redskins."

Illustration on government abuse of civil forfeiture laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The menace of civil forfeiture

Whether your metric is the stonewalling and misleading of congressional investigations or the racially discriminatory enforcement of civil rights laws in violation of the Constitution's equal-protection principles, the Obama Justice Department is the most politicized in the nation's history.

Illustration on the real results of Obama's so-called immigration reform by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

Unfaithfully executing the law

President Obama is soon expected to issue an executive order that would make it possible for some illegal immigrants to live and work in this country without the threat of deportation, in effect granting amnesty to up to 5 million people.

Barry Goldwater in 1965. (AP Photo)

In the beginning there was Goldwater

- The Washington Times

In a very real sense, the modern conservative political movement began with Barry Goldwater. Had it not been for the Arizona senator it might have taken years or even decades for conservative ideas to break into the political mainstream, Ronald Reagan would be remembered today not as one of our greatest presidents, but as a "B" movie star and television host, and many of those who since the 1960s shaped our nation's politics would not have had an opportunity to do so.

Barry Goldwater waves to delegates inside the Cow Palace at the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco. As a senator, he strongly argued that it is a core American value and in the country's best interest to stand by Taiwan as it faced an existential threat from tyrannical communists. Goldwater's contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific. He championed the passage of the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA), a landmark piece of legislation, which through bipartisan support, was signed into law in April 1979. To this day, that law provides the bedrock for U.S.-Taiwan relations. (Associated Press)

Goldwater: Unwavering friend of 'Free China'

Barry Goldwater is rightfully an icon of the American conservative movement for decades since the 1960s, and it is a privilege and an honor to contribute to his remembrance on the 50th anniversary of his presidential campaign. What many Americans may not know, however, is the role then-Sen. Goldwater played in the U.S. relations with my country, the Republic of China (ROC, Taiwan), usually termed by the senator as "Free China." His contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific as well.

Sen. Barry Goldwater, Arizona Republican, announces his candidacy for the U.S. presidency in Phoenix on Jan. 3, 1964.

The man who ignited a revolution

Who was Barry Goldwater, universally known as "Mr. Conservative," and how did his '64 presidential campaign ignite a conservative revolution?

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Resilience Dividend'

Resilience, as defined by Judith Rodin is the capacity of any entity, ranging from an individual, a corporation or a society, to pre-emptively prepare for sudden disruptions that were unpredicted, to recover from them and then to take advantage of new opportunities produced by the disruption for further growth and expansion.

Citizens hold signs at the Westminster Board of Health meeting on the proposed tobacco ban, at the Westminster Elementary School, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, in Westminster, Ma. A public meeting on a central Massachusetts town's proposed first-in-the-nation ban on tobacco and nicotine sales ended early Wednesday because officials say the crowd was getting too unruly to continue. (AP Photo/Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Steve Lanava)

EDITORIAL: Anti-smoking fanaticism

Prohibition is back in Westminster, a rural town of about 8,000 near the New Hampshire border in north-central Massachusetts. The town's three-member board of health said it would prohibit the sale of all tobacco products within the town's borders.