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U.S. President Donald Trump, center, gets up to leave after making a quick statement at a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Donald Trump, the right guy to rein in the United Nations

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump took the United Nations to task in recent remarks at the global body’s New York headquarters, telling those attending a special forum on “management, security and development” that the entity was in dire need of reform. It’s about time America snipped the U.N.’s wings.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Sept. 19, 2017

What the hurricanes teach

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were as powerful as the big South Florida hurricanes of 1926, 1928, and 1935, but the death toll was very small compared to the earlier hurricanes in the area, even though the population is now more than 10 times the size. The Great Galveston hurricane of 1900 is estimated to have cost 6,000 to 12,000 lives. The hurricanes that have hit the U.S. in the last 50 years have resulted in relatively few lives lost, with the exception of Hurricane Katrina where an estimated 1,833 died.

Duplicitous Durbin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Democrats try to impose a ‘religious test’

- The Washington Times

The attempted Senate mugging of Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett by Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Dick Durbin was ugly and may have amounted to an attempt to impose an unconstitutional “religious test” on a judicial nominee seeking Senate confirmation, but said more about the muggers than their intended victim.

One of 35 immigrants from 23 countries awaits the start of the naturalization ceremony that will transform them into American citizens at Northeast Jackson International Baccalaureate World Middle School in Jackson, Miss., Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. The immigrants underwent an extensive security check as well as study and testing on U.S. history, civics and government, as part of the requirements to earning citizenship documentation. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

The ignorant nation and its legacy

At a National Archives ceremony last Friday in Washington, D.C., 30 immigrants became naturalized U.S. citizens. In a video, President Trump encouraged them to embrace the “full rights, and the sacred duties, that come with American citizenship.”

Illustration on the North Korean threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

There’s no easy living with a nuclear-armed North Korea

We cannot learn to live with a nuclear-armed North Korea because it is a pistol aimed at our heads by the North’s dictator Kim Jong-un, China’s dictator Xi Jinping and Russia’s dictator Vladimir Putin, that sooner or later will go off.

In Praise of Asylum Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A thank you to America

On Sept. 6 at 9:57 a.m., the U.S. government accepted my application for political asylum in the United States. I want to thank the U.S. government and the great American people for taking us into their embrace and their wings at a moment when I, along with my family, am faced with the greatest adversity of my life.

The Capitol is seen at sunrise as Congress returns from the August recess to face work on immigration, the debt limit, funding the government, and help for victims of Hurricane Harvey, in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Washington’s unethical ethics watchdog

Before “fake news” there was CREW — the ridiculously self-proclaimed Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. This supposed government ethics watchdog has always been more of a partisan lapdog to left-leaning politicians. But now — according to a leaked document authored by Democratic hit man David Brock — CREW is set to dramatically expand its size and scope to be a key player in pursuit of impeaching President Trump and disrupting Republican priorities.

Illustration on infrastructural development in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Building a stronger America

The infrastructure in China is impressive. My recent visit extremely impacted my perspective on the overall transportation systems in the United States as I witness that China has a big advantage with their wonderful airports, road systems and with their unique Shanghai Maglev Train. I had the opportunity to ride on the world’s fastest commercial train; it has maintained its record since 2004.

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and other Republican leaders repeatedly cited the Byrd rule, which applies only in the Senate, as the rationale behind every retreat in their attempt to repeal Obamacare. (Associated Press/File)

Tax reform doomed if Republicans use Obamacare repeal model

There is universal agreement that the tax code is a disaster, and a general consensus among Republicans about what needs to be done. Tax reform could unleash the American economy, sparking the growth that has been lacking for a decade. Can it actually get done?

Illustration on The Washington Post's appraisal of Jeff Sessions' report on U.S. violent crime by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Post deserves these four Pinocchios

In a Sept. 1 “fact check,” The Washington Post claimed to evaluate Attorney General Sessions’ comments about rising violent crime in the United States. Specifically, this “fact check” is of Mr. Sessions’ repeated statements that “violent crime is on the rise in America, especially in our cities.”

Related Articles

An honest accounting of a skillful tactician

At a time when our history books and biographies are being revised at warp speed by practitioners of identity politics and a generation of academics fearful of being accused of being politically incorrect and losing their jobs, Craig Shirley stands out as an honest and highly talented biographer who is also a man of conviction.

Addy Valdez, 12, holds her cousin, Jasmine, while her family starts to clean up the damage from Hurricane Irma in Everglades City, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (Katie Klann/Naples Daily News via AP)

Disasters and dopes

Disaster comes in a variety of heartbreaking shapes and sizes, all of them unwelcome. Some, like global warming, are the work of nature; others are man-made. A little bit of rationality is all it takes to figure out which is which. But recent events suggest that the day they were handing out common sense some people stepped up to the nonsense window instead.

Police and fire vehicles shield the view of a trailer home where five children died in a house fire in The Butte, Alaska, on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. Officials believes the victims were five girls, all between the ages of 3 and 12. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

Racing to the self-driving car

The freedom of the open road holds a magnetic appeal for Americans, quickening like the flood when Henry Ford unleashed his Model T, but exhilaration can't be traded for the convenience of the "safety" of a car that drives itself. Such a car is a measure of progress only if it works.

Give Lee credit for contributions

The pell-mell rush to remove any public reference to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is as thoughtless as it is short-sighted. There were reasons other than romanticizing slavery that led to honoring Lee. The post-war Lee is a figure that all Americans should appreciate.

Bolster Japan to weaken N. Korea

As a counterweight to China and North Korea we should encourage Japan to build up its military capabilities. Japan should increase its front-line military personnel from 250,000 to 350,000 and increase the number of tanks from 700 to 1,000 and armored vehicles from 3,000 to 4,000.

In this April 29, 2017, file photo, Steve Bannon, chief White House strategist to President Donald Trump, tours The AMES Companies, Inc., with the president in Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Steve Bannon-CBS takeaway: Swamp creatures are winning

- The Washington Times

Steve Bannon, in an interview with Charlie Rose on "60 Minutes" on CBS, said elites in the Republican Party have been steadily working to "nullify" the results of the 2016 election, and cast President Donald Trump to the side. It doesn't get any clearer -- or more honest -- than that.

Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins walks out of a tunnel to the field before an NFL football game against the Philadelphia Eagles, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, in Landover, Md. (AP Photo/Mark Tenally)

LOVERRO: Cousins loses Week 1 to Bruce Allen

The referendum on 29-year-old Cousins continues, and you would be hard-pressed to find many voters not named Cousins to cast their ballot to make the man the highest paid player in NFL history after Sunday's opening game defeat.

Uncle Sam from the illustration by James Montgomery Flagg

How Uncle Sam became an icon

No tribute was more moving after Americans witnessed the horror of Sept. 11, 2001, than Queen Elizabeth II breaking tradition two days later by having the Star-Spangled Banner played at the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace before a crowd of some 5,000 tearful Americans.

Illustration on Taiwanese prosperity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How agricultural trade cements the Taiwan-U.S. bond

In mid-September, another big delegation of the Agricultural Trade Goodwill Mission from Taiwan will come to Washington D.C. to sign the Letters of Intent between Taiwan and U.S. agricultural associations for a total purchase of approximately $3 billion worth of soybeans, corn and wheat to be delivered over the next two years.

Illustration on Edward Snowden and the NSA leak by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Traitor, thief, scoundrel, spy

My role in the Vietnam War was a minor one. I served as an 18-year-old seaman in the radio communication division aboard the USS Kitty Hawk as the aircraft carrier performed combat operations on "Yankee Station" off the coast of Vietnam in 1970 and 1971.

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner watched Donald Trump fill out his papers to be on the nation's earliest presidential primary ballot in 2015. Mr. Gardner says he will remain on the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, though he disagrees with voter fraud allegations made by the panel's vice chairman about his state. (Associated Press/File)

The old vote scam in the mountains

Here are some connect-the-dot facts: The New Hampshire-Massachusetts border is a mere 40-minute drive for civic-minded progressives in Boston. The Granite State has same-day registration, which means you can register to vote and then cast a ballot on the same day.

Illustration on economic growth since Trump's election by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Trump boom arrives

Anyone noticed through the fog of Russia, Comey, Charlottesville, and now two monster hurricanes that the U.S. economy is booming faster than any time since the late Clinton years?

Terrorists use families as shields

Hezbollah is a large Shiite military/terrorist organization with headquarters in Lebanon and funding by Iran. It is the major power broker in Lebanon and has supported Iran's efforts in Syria to stabilize the Assad government by fighting against the democratic forces and the Islamic State there.

Democracy for Rohingya, too

Let us recall when Western parliamentarians eulogized 'democracy' advocate and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi. This was, after all, the lady who when asked about Myanmar's treatment of the Rohingya people, claimed they were interlopers.