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Chart to accompany Moore article March 30, 2015

Not hard at work but hardly working

The great conundrum of the U.S. economy today is that we have record numbers of working-age Americans out of the labor force at the same time we have businesses desperately trying to find workers. For example, the American Transportation Research Institute estimates there are about 35,000 trucker jobs that could be filled tomorrow if workers would take these jobs — a shortage that could rise to 240,000 by 2022.

Phasing out renewable energy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pulling the plug on renewable energy

There is never a good time for bad public policy. For few policies is this more evident than renewable energy mandates (REM), variously known as renewable portfolio standards, alternative energy standards and renewable energy standards.

Illustration on Putin's designs on eastern Europe BY Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Russia’s grab for its neighbors

A bipartisan consensus is emerging that the United States should do more to address Russia’s continuing aggression against Ukraine. But Russian revanchism does not begin or end with Ukraine, nor are “little green men” its only foreign policy instrument. Moscow is actively engaged in subversive activities along Europe’s eastern flank, targeting the region’s economic and political stability. As Central European capitals grow increasingly concerned, Washington urgently needs to demonstrate its robust commitment not just to the region’s security but to its democratic future.

Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, wearing an army uniform, ride on an armed truck to patrol the international airport in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 28, 2015. Yemen's President Abed Raboo Mansour Hadi, speaking at an Arab summit in Egypt on Saturday, called Shiite rebels who forced him to flee the country "puppets of Iran," directly blaming the Islamic Republic for the chaos there and demanding airstrikes against rebel positions continue until they surrender. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Why Yemen matters

Thoughts on the shifting dynamics in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama’s love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That’s good enough for me. He says he’s a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that’s good enough for God it’s good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they’re working on it).

Obamacare in a death spiral illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obamacare flying machine begins a death spiral

The Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, the case challenging the Obama administration’s decision to award tax credits for health insurance sold through federally established exchanges, could turn on the question of whether a ruling that ends the tax credits on federal exchanges might cause something known as a “death spiral” in health insurance markets.

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz’s announcement this week that he’s running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the “1 percent.” While it’s still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it’s assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee’s platform.

Illustration on the lack of U.S abortion data by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unhealthy state of abortion statistics

Abortion advocates in Congress and in state legislatures claim that abortions are “safe.” Yet numerous, long-standing problems at the state and federal level illustrate that the abortion data collection and reporting system in the United States is haphazard and dysfunctional, making assertions about “abortion safety” unreliable.

Illustration on the Cotton letter's impact on nuclear talks with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tom Cotton, tragic hero

The snarky quip attributed to 19th-century French Foreign Minister Charles Maurice de Talleyrand — “It was worse than a crime; it was a blunder” — has recently been making the rounds to deride a letter written by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and signed by 46 other senators.

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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2015 file photo, Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearing.  The White House blasted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday for holding up confirmation of Lynch, President Barack Obama's pick for attorney general, arguing the "unconscionable delay" was a stain on the Kentucky Republican's leadership. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Opportunity for Mitch McConnell

Loretta Lynch, President Obama's choice to succeed Attorney General Eric Holder, appears to be in trouble. So is the Republican legislation to do something about sex trafficking of girls and women, and the Republicans can prevail in both cases if Mitch McConnell doesn't blink before Harry Reid. This would erase the humiliation of the majority leader's performance in the debate over the budget for the Homeland Security Agency.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during a meeting of the Victory Day celebrations organizing committee in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, March 17, 2015. Russia's foreign minister says the leader of North Korea is among 26 world leaders who have accepted invitations to Moscow to take part in celebrations marking the 70th anniversary of the Soviet Union's victory over Nazi Germany. (AP Photo/Sergei Ilnitsky, Pool)

When dictators go missing

When Russian President Vladimir Putin vanished from sight in early March all the explanation were colorful rumors. The maximum leader was a victim of a coup, he was attending the birth of his "love child" (the warmer, fuzzier Vlad), he was having cosmetic surgery (bullies on steeds need Botox, too). Or he was dead.

Illustration on the budget-cutting duties of the next president by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wanted: A budget-cutting president

The candidate who wins the presidency in 2016 will be the one who vows to wage all-out war on a bloated, inefficient, corrupt government in need of a top-to-bottom, budget-cutting revolution.

Life there, once upon a time? NASA scientists say a primitive ocean on Mars held more water than Earth's Arctic Ocean. (NASA/GSFC)

Library of Congress explores the implications of 'selfhood' and extraterrestrial life

- The Washington Times

Space, the final frontier for academia? On Wednesday and Thursday, the Library of Congress will focus on revelations in astrobiology, and there's a big title: "Astrobiology and the Religious Imagination: Reexamining Notions of Creation, Humanity, Selfhood, and the Cosmos." For the uninitiated, astrobiology is a multi-disciplinary field which deals in extraterrestrial matters, asking "How does life begin and evolve? Is there life beyond Earth and, if so, how can we detect it? What is the future of life on Earth and in the universe?"

Carson right on homosexuality

How predictable to see Dr. Ben Carson bullied by the militant gay lobby for speaking the truth — that unlike skin color, being gay is ultimately a choice ("Ben Carson cites prison as proof that homosexuality is a choice," Web, March 4).

Signatories right on Iran letter

Contrary to the objections of the White House and President Obama's spokespersons, congressional leaders had every right to make clear in a letter to the Iranian leaders what the difference is between an executive order/agreement and a treaty ratified by Congress and signed by the president.

Illustration on love, forgiveness and racial harmony by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The power of forgiveness

Turn on the news and you expect to see people of different races and politics denouncing each other. That's why what happened last week on "The Kelly File," Megyn Kelly's Fox News program, was so remarkable.

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler speaks during new conference in Washington in this Oct. 8, 2014, file photo. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

Saying ‘so long’ to the First Amendment

Two weeks after the Federal Communications Commission voted to regulate the Internet as a utility, the masters of the universe at the FCC, three unelected Democrats, are finally allowing Americans to see the actual order on exactly how they intend to ruin one of the major free speech and free market successes in the world.

Islamophobia and the justification of violence

Only in the rarified atmosphere of academia can the American flag be seen as a symbol of hate, and killing people for their opinions can be justified as the natural outgrowth of Islamophobia.

Sen. Barbara Boxer. (Associated Press)

Global warming snipe hunt

Politics and science can be a lethal combination. When scientists armed with their version of new-age religion draw a policy line that all must toe, objectivity is banished. Climate-change Torquemadas in the U.S. Senate are designing an inquisition to punish organizations that question the government-approved global warming creed. Couched as a means to "request information," the senators' queries carry the malevolent tone of a letter from the IRS, seeking further information about a tax return. Fortunately, it's not yet illegal to tell the senators where to go. (Using this strategy with the IRS is not advised.)

Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions at a news conference at the United Nations, Tuesday, March 10, 2015.   Clinton conceded that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of "convenience." (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Paying attention: 65 percent of Americans 'closely' following Hillary's email controversy

- The Washington Times

It's not the vast right wing conspiracy ramping up rumors and hearsay into a perfect storm of lousy press for Hillary Clinton. Americans themselves are tracking the unfolding controversy over Mrs. Clinton's use of private emails during her time as Secretary of State: 65 percent say they are "closely" following the story; 78 percent of Republicans and 68 percent of Democrats agree, says a new YouGov poll:

Illustration on political and economic success in Chile by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chile, where freedom nurtures success

Why have Chile, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, Estonia and the Cayman Islands all become relatively prosperous in recent decades while other countries have lagged? The answer is not a mystery, but is often ignored or even suppressed by the political and media classes in many places throughout the world because many of them believe the truth will diminish their own political power.

Abraham Lincoln: A man of his words

Most presidents are defined by what happened while they were in office and what others write about them afterward. Few paint enduring self-portraits in their own words. In the 20th century, only Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan embedded themselves in history largely through their living words and images — FDR via radio and film, Reagan using television as well

Harm will define Obama tenure

For Justice Department attorneys to state with a straight face before the Fifth Circuit and claim irreparable harm to five million criminal aliens if amnesty is not granted is to spit in the face of every American citizen and valued legal guest.

Illustration on shedding light on Federal pension records by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The dark secrets of federal pensions

It's national Sunshine Week across America. During this week, good-government groups advocate for open government and transparency. One area that remains hidden is federal pensions.

Sen. Tom Cotton (Associated Press)

Regrets for doing the right thing

- The Washington Times

We can add senators to bread, toilet paper and milk on the list of panic items when the snow flies. Fortunately, the snow won't fly again in Washington until next year if we're lucky, but the senators are still here.

Uncover Clinton email truth

Hillary Clinton does not want her private emails made public, but as an American citizen I don't want public emails kept private. Mrs. Clinton made a poor decision, and for that the American public should not be left in the dark.