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Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they’re watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to “other” the world’s only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia’s McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

Overheated concern about July’s warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the “hottest” month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, “ever”). And future Julys will only become hotter.

Gravesite of Main Stream Media Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The legacy media meltdown over Donald Trump

The meltdown of the American legacy media is now complete. Conservatives are sadly aware of the decline of The New York Times, the supposed “newspaper of record,” as the benchmark for legacy media in general.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

For sale, the most brazen president money can buy

- The Washington Times

It’s coming clear now why Hillary Clinton wanted her own email server, free from oversight by anyone, and why she resisted so ferociously enabling anyone from getting even a hint to what she was hiding. Her presidency, if there is one, has been sold, and a new batch of emails pried out of the government by Judicial Watch reveals the going rate for Hillary.

Gen. Jack Vessey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A soldier’s soldier

Until he died last week at 94, former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. John W. Vessey Jr. was a living memorial to an earlier America — where God and country were not seen as contradictions, where faith formed the bedrock of personal and national character.

Defining alcohol consumption down

With summer vacation drawing to a close, many parents are eager to pop a bottle of bubbly in celebration.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. **File (Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Imperial dreams

Historically, the West has faced an existential threat from both the Persian and Russian empires. The Persian Empire was fueled by the expansionist dreams of Darius and Xerxes, foiled only by the heroism of the Greeks, led by men like Themistocles.

Illustration on Republican support for Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Republican turncoats forget

I asked a successful businessman the other day what he thought about Donald Trump. He turned his thumb down. Wow. Are you going to vote for Hillary? I asked with trepidation. “Of course not,” he replied almost insulted by the question. “I understand the concept of a binary decision.”

Illustration on the virtues of coal bed methane energy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good news for the energy industry

While the price of oil may be beginning to climb up a bit these days, we hope it has at least seen the bottom. The devastating effect of oil prices on cities, companies and workers cannot be overstated. The energy industry needs some good news. And they may found it. Coal bed methane (CBM) is a clean and renewable energy source that most people have never heard of.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton talks with students as she tours classrooms at John Marshall High School in Cleveland, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016, before participating in a campaign event. Standing behind Clinton at right is Eric Gordon, Chief Executive Officer, Cleveland Metropolitan School District, and David Quolke, President, Cleveland Teachers Union, second from right. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Awaiting a second ‘Dear Hillary’ letter

One constant in the education world over the past 25 years has been the periodic release of reports warning that American workers will be unable to compete in the global economy unless education becomes a seamless web of government-managed workforce preparation. Think Common Core State Standards (CCSS), most recently.

President Barack Obama is seated in the presidential vehicle as his motorcade leaves after playing a round of golf at Farm Neck Golf Course in Oak Bluffs, Mass., on Martha's Vineyard, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The humiliation of a president

- The Washington Times

“We do not pay ransom. We didn’t here, and we won’t in the future.” Barack Obama might like to have that one back this morning, to stick a pin in the moving finger that writes. But the finger done writ, and it won’t come back to cancel a single line of the president’s fatuous fib that the United States didn’t pay $400 million to ransom four hostages taken by the president’s friends in Tehran.

Illustration on justice reform by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Out front on justice reform

Most of the discussion on justice reform efforts focuses on federal legislation. Indeed, several bills with bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate would aid in safely reducing the federal prison population and addressing the revolving door of incarceration. And while justice reform advocates are frustrated that these bills have yet to come to a vote, focusing all the attention on the Hill misses the forest for the trees.

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks a group of pastors at the Orlando Convention Center, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Moving closer to 'Clexit'

First there was Brexit, when Great Britain shook up the global establishment by following through on a dare to exit the European Union. Now a movement is building that would further stun the supranationalists: an exit from the United Nations climate change protocol, dubbed "Clexit." (Not very imaginative, but sloganeers are rarely original.)

Illustration on biased journalism's impact on liberty by Linas Garys/the Washington Times

Journalism's double standard

Every time a David Duke or some other marginal Klan-connected or neo-Nazi lowlife crawls out from under a rock and gratuitously endorses Donald Trump (or anyone else, particularly a Republican or a conservative), the mainstream media call breathless attention to the news. They further demand that Mr. Trump or the other endorsee renounce the unsolicited and unwanted endorsement.

Who's unfit for leadership?

So 50 Republican officials think Donald Trump is not fit to be president. I didn't see a letter from them regarding Hillary Clinton's and Barack Obama's fitness, so I presume these lofty, high-minded civil servants believe both of those folks are just fine.

Hillary Clinton took pages from Mr. Obama's economic plans, echoing his calls for an infrastructure bank and a clean energy surge. (Associated Press)

Hillary's stale economics

It's too bad that Ronald Reagan is not around today to say, "Well, there she goes again." Hillary Clinton's much-anticipated economic policy speech was full of fluffy rhetoric, stale proposals for rebuilding the middle class that Barack Obama peddled eight years ago. Those were the ideas that tanked the middle class.

Government out of whack

The wheels of our three branches of government are enormously out of balance. The judicial branch decides that health insurance premiums are taxes, the executive branch legislates via executive order, the legislative branch writes laws, and government agencies take charge.

Jacob Zuma Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Of arms and the man named Zuma

- The Washington Times

I first met Jacob Zuma, South Africa's controversial president, in 2002 when he was serving as then-President Thabo Mbeki's vice president. I was in South Africa at the behest of a number of South African outfitters and professional hunters to urge the government to reject a British-inspired laundry list of firearms regulations that would have crippled big-game hunting in South Africa.

BOOK REVIEW: 'This Must be the Place'

We've all said, "This must be the place," after being frustrated by the hassles of finding our way somewhere. Perhaps the directions have been poor, or the map less than useful. And with all the effort expended, it's still not entirely certain that this really is the place: It's more that other possibilities have been excluded.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gives a speech on the economy after touring Futuramic Tool & Engineering, in Warren, Mich., Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

When a presidential race rages out of control

- The Washington Times

It's the conceit of every generation that horses have never been faster, whisky has never been older, beautiful women have never been younger — and politics have never been rowdier. But maybe our generation has a legitimate claim.

Trump a better choice for Israel

Two proudly Jewish conservative pundits, Charles Krauthammer and Mark Levin, as well as other Jewish #NeverTrump movement members, seem to be doing their best to dampen enthusiasm about and dissuade millions of conservatives from actively supporting Donald Trump.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to medical professionals after taking a tour of Borinquen Health Care Center, in Miami, Fla., Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016, to see how they are combatting Zika. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary and the Second Amendment

Another day, another Donald Trumpism to exploit and enjoy. What the Republican candidate actually said about Hillary Clinton and the Second Amendment was quickly lost in the Democratic hysteria that always follows any hint of g-u-n-s. (We can't even say the word.)

Illustration on secret service experience with Hillary Clinton's temperament by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The temperament issue

If you are wondering about Donald Trump's temperament after some of his remarks, you might want to compare it with Hillary Clinton's.

FILE - The main building of the National Institutes of Health is seen in Bethesda, Md., in this Aug. 17, 2009 file photo. Ten clinicians with a Boston-based nonprofit organization responding to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone are to be transported to the United States after one of their colleagues was infected with the deadly disease.  The clinician who became infected has already been evacuated and is receiving treatment at the National Institutes of Health. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

The coming age of the chimera

Flights of fantasy have long envisioned animals with human traits. George Lucas' "Star Wars" entertained millions of movie fans with an iconic tavern scene where all manner of beastly aliens packed a drinking dive and behaved in a way that any visitor to a biker bar would recognize. Beasts behaving badly.

Illustration on the health and abundance of bees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Stinging fears over 'bee-pocalypse'

"Pollinator summits" in Minnesota and elsewhere during the past year have showcased discussions among beekeepers, landscapers, farmers and government agencies on how to better protect honeybees, butterflies, birds and bats that pollinate flowers, crops and other plants.