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George H. W. Bush   Associated Press photo

Weak, confused and ‘unable to grasp’

- The Washington Times

Many bad things happen when a leader is weak, confused and forever in search of a credible reason to do nothing. For all his softness on Islam, Barack Obama has little insight into the men who send out mobs to cry “death to America.” He can’t imagine that men can listen to the call to evening Muslim prayer, which so captivated him as a boy growing up in Indonesia — “the prettiest sound on Earth” — and be inspired to dream of bringing down death on America.

Illustration on giving thanks for the American military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Grateful for American muscle

We Americans have much to be grateful for. Every year we gather together with friends and family to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday. When we do, we should be grateful as well for the service of the American military in far-flung outposts.

Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen answers to the House Oversight Committee in the panel's continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the government's tax agency, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Earlier this month, IRS official Lois Lerner was called to testify about the controversy but refused to answer questions by committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights at least nine times. Associated Press Photo

Impeach IRS chief John Koskinen

After revelations that the Internal Revenue Service was restricting political speech and targeting conservative and tea party groups, John Koskinen was appointed to head the agency, promising reform and transparency.

The monument to General Gouverneur K. Warren at Gettysburg     The Washington Times

A Thanksgiving message in bronze

In the fall of 1865, America marked its first Thanksgiving since the end of the Civil War. Seven months earlier, after Robert E. Lee had surrendered on April 9, the North held a spontaneous jubilee. Cannons boomed, fireworks illuminated the night sky, bands played, people sang in the streets and crowds cheered the savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln.

Religious Roots of Thanksgiving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the time when America’s religious roots and traditions are publicly displayed. While we think of feasting at tables filled with food and drink, and imagine the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony inviting neighboring Indians to join them to celebrate a plentiful harvest, Thanksgiving Day has a much more religious meaning. It was not uncommon in the 17th and 18th centuries for individual colonies to set aside days for prayers of gratitude to our Lord.

An American flag sits in front of gravestones on Veterans Day at San Francisco National Cemetery in the Presidio of San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

A refugee’s tale of Thanksgiving

As I grew up in America, I came to realize that the most effective antidote for fear is not courage, but gratitude.

Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France — and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel — have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks — and that seems unlikely.

The Approval of Technical Wrong Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the gun-ignorant make gun laws

When the state of Maryland quietly killed off its 15-year, $5 million social experiment in gun control — so-called “ballistic fingerprinting” — it served up the latest example of people who know nothing about firearms making technical laws about guns. The news of this latest failure (not a single crime solved in 15 years) followed New York shutting down a similar program, and it generated from gun owners and gun makers a tired “We told you so.”

MS St. Louis, 1939. The Voyage of Doom.

Stopping the next Holocaust

By now, in the days following the Paris massacre and the Brussels lockdown, many Americans have been reminded of the awful fate of the S.S. Saint Louis. In 1939, fleeing the impending doom of the Holocaust, some 900 Jews boarded the cruise ship in Hamburg, Germany, and crossed the Atlantic.

NATO Safe Area for Refugees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Responding to humanitarian catastrophe

The international community just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Accords, a landmark peace agreement that brought an end to the Bosnian War and a grave humanitarian crisis in the Balkans.

Illustration on the need for streamlines conceal carry permits in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/the Washington Times

Fighting ISIS with concealed carry

Following the recent Paris attacks, the Islamic State recently announced its intention to “strike America at its center,” in Washington, D.C. Our response should be swift and decisive.

Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon           Associated Press photo

A military witch hunt that almost succeeded

Along with many Americans, I salute The Washington Times for having the courage to not only report on the Air Force general court martial persecution-prosecution of Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon, but to continue following this case with a series of updates from the courtroom trial in Minot, N.D., until the court martial concluded on Nov. 14.

Related Articles

Illustration on China's aggressive moves in the South China Sea by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Erasing a line in the South China Sea

It's too early for the Philippines to take any victory laps over the recent Hague international tribunal ruling regarding claims filed against China over disputed areas in the South China Sea.

Illustration on the impact of Obama's Clean Power Act on Texas' electric power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The dirty business of 'clean power'

Access to affordable and reliable electricity is about more than being able to turn on your lights when you get home from work. We need it to power our schools, supermarkets, hospitals, offices, manufacturing plants and airports. But like all things in life, electricity isn't free.

Charge pollution 'dividend'

Thank you for the great Nov. 4 op-ed "Why conservatives should set a price on carbon pollution" (Web) pointing out that we need to take a market-based approach to energy. Right now the political clout of fossil fuel-corporations gets them massive government subsidies and we socialize the costs of carbon pollution.

Continue aid to Israel

The first step in talking about the situation in Israel should be to correct any misconceptions relating to the current Arab-Israeli conflict ("Obama, Netanyahu to discuss U.S. military aid to Israel," Web, Nov. 8).

President Obama. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Bordering on lawlessness

The Constitution matters. The much-abused document on which the republic stands has been rescued from the trash bin where President Obama threw it, and still stands between the government and his "progressive" goal of using a flood of illegal immigrants to build a permanent "progressive" majority. The reprieve is welcome but Mr. Obama has not learned much.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter speaks during a news conference at the Pentagon, Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) ** FILE **

Nuances ride again

How quickly Washington forgets that Ronald Reagan's forthright stand against Soviet totalitarianism and the tyranny of Communist China was the object of derision at the time. The elites sniffed and scoffed at the cowboy president. He was so unsophisticated. The late Clark Clifford, expensive lawyer, fixer and tutor of the elites, called him "an amiable dunce."

Illustration on thecorruption of the justice system by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Punishing the Obama way

Although the rot has been visible for some time, recent actions by President Obama's Department of Justice and director of national intelligence make it possible to say definitively that the United States we once extolled as a nation of laws and not of men no longer exists.

Executive Crook Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being an executive is not a crime

Here's a quiz: Which of the following is a federal crime: (a) A hamster dealer needlessly tilting a hamster's cage while in transit; (b) subliminally advertising wine; or (c) selling a fresh steak with paprika on it?

Illustration on the court reversals of Obama's overstepping his authority under the Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The president and the rule of law

Earlier this week, a federal appeals court in New Orleans upheld an injunction issued by a federal district court in Texas against the federal government, thereby preventing it from implementing President Obama's executive orders on immigration.

Illustration on students' entitlement mentality on college campuses by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The closing of the American mouth

College kids do the darndest things. You send them away to open up their minds and they learn to close them, for themselves and for others. The tantrum generation just managed a left-wing coup at the University of Missouri, stifling freedom of expression and forcing out the president and chancellor of the university.

Rotten to the Core Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Common Core's double whammy

Some of the most reliable yardsticks in monitoring academic progress in K-12 education are the assessments known as the Nation's Report Card, officially the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The results from its 2015 assessments are in, and they are not encouraging.

Historic Defense Dept. image of a Dust Off air evacuation crew in action during the Vietnam War. The primary transport was the The Bell UH-1 Iroquois "Huey" helicopter - the air ambulance.

Hooah: Vietnam-era 'Dustoff' air ambulance crews nominated for Congressional Gold Medal

- The Washington Times

Sens. John Cornyn and Joe Manchin have introduced legislation to award an elite group of Vietnam veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal. That would be the tenacious "Dust Off" crews, who drew their name from the U.S. Army 57th Medical Detachment's radio call sign and fearlessly flew unarmed air ambulances into combat to rescue and evacuate the wounded. Their airborne mission has roots dating back to World War II.