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The Court and the Burwell Obamacare Case Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A prescription for health care after Burwell

On Wednesday, the nine justices of the United States Supreme Court will consider the case of King v. Burwell, concerning the constitutionality of Obamacare, determining the limits of President Obama’s executive power and the ability of the president to rewrite laws on his own while ignoring the constitutional duties of the legislative branch of government.

A Nuclear-Armed Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dubious deal of the century

Remember when President Obama said that to prevent the Islamic Republic of Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapons capability, he would keep all options “on the table”? How long has it been since anyone took that warning seriously?

The Tarheels Step on Themselves Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cleaning up the campus boondoggles

Readers of this column are familiar with my argument that a conservative tide is sweeping the country, contrary to the mainstream media. In the off-year elections of 2010 and 2014, the gains made by conservatives have been substantial in governors’ mansions and in state legislatures. To be sure, they have been substantial in Washington, too, at the House and Senate level, but I would argue that they have been more consequential at the state level. There, old conventions that have been in place since the left-wing 1960s are being heaved out and a clamor of protest is being heard from the evicted. It can only get worse.

** FILE ** An undated photo of Adolf Hitler. (Image: United States Holocaust Museum)

To know offensive ideology is to read it

Anyone who believes in the right to freedom of speech and expression knows it’s a two-way street. You have to consistently defend speech that you fundamentally agree with, as well as speech that you completely oppose.

In this March 20, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu huddle during their joint news conference in Jerusalem, Israel. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The occasion the Democrats asked for

- The Washington Times

The Democrats set out to teach John Boehner and Benjamin Netanyahu a lesson. They would boycott the Israeli prime minister’s speech to Congress and apply enough pressure to cancel the speech, keep Mr. Netanyahu at home and embarrass the Republicans who invited him here. What a happy day’s work that would be.

American Defense if Israel Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Standing with Israel in a dangerous world

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Such an invitation is one of the highest honors we can bestow on a foreign leader. And such a speech is normally an occasion of unity in Washington, when elected officials put partisan politics aside and come together to focus on weighty issues of national security.

Failure to Protect Against Iranian Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Iran goes nuclear

Our attention these days with regard to security is understandably riveted on the Islamic State, or ISIS, and its hideous decapitations, rapes and live immolations. We must deal with the Islamic State, but it is not the gravest threat we face. The Israelis are right — we should awaken to the fact that the coming of a nuclear Iran holds special dangers and requires particularly urgent attention. There are four driving reasons.

Obama Veto of Keystone Pipeline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Keystone XL pipeline veto

Experienced vote counters do not believe that either the House or the Senate will muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill. If so, Mr. Obama’s years of delay and disingenuousness on this issue, culminating in his veto, will guarantee negative consequences for America long into the future.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures while addressing the 2015 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Standing with Israel

A world leader giving an address to Congress shouldn’t be controversial, especially when that leader is the prime minister of a major U.S. ally — indeed, a bulwark of freedom in a deeply troubled region of the world.

Attendees vote in the CPAC 2015 Straw Poll at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

CPAC then and now

A conservative reflects on the annual confab.

Illustration on the progressive tax structure by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Do the rich pay their fair share?

Suppose there were a banquet for 100 people and at the end of the night it was time to split the bill of $50 per person. If that bill were paid for the way we pay our income taxes, here is how it would work. Those in the top half of income would pay roughly $97 each and those in the bottom half of the income would pay an average of $3 each. Almost 40 people would pay nothing. And the single richest person in the room would cough up $1,750.

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Shameful talking heads

Mohammed Saeed al-Sahhaf, AKA "Baghdad Bob," was a former Iraqi diplomat. He came under worldwide ridicule while acting as the spokesperson for the Saddam Hussein regime during the 2003 Gulf War.

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2014 file photo, then-acting Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. US officials say President Barack Obama has picked  Clancy as agency's director.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Obama guarantees Secret Service failings

With the selection of Acting Secret Service Director Joseph P. Clancy as the director, President Obama has guaranteed that the agency will continue to lurch from one shocking security failure to another.

Evolution's lingering questions

Several years ago in an Internet commentary many people were complaining about God being mentioned as our Creator in a Texas textbook. Based on their belief that we all evolved, I wrote and asked which evolved first — male or female? I was called a Neanderthal and a member of the flat earth society who didn't believe planes could fly and other names.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has a small lead in early polls in New Hampshire. (Associated Press)

Jockeying for poll position

The grueling political marathon for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination has begun, with three contenders out in front and everyone else far behind.

The  Maryland State House dome standing above buildings in Annapolis.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Protecting aging senators

Anything goes, we suppose, in politics as in love and war. Life expectancy in the United States now stands at 78.8 years, and Maryland Democrats, stung by losing the governorship last November, are trying to change the rules of Senate succession to protect their aging senators.

Infrastructure in Need of Repair Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rebuilding the American powerhouse

Our infrastructure is collapsing, and Americans know it. They see it every day in the potholes they drive over, the bridges in their communities that have been shut down and the water pipes that burst.

How the Spanish Civil War shaped history

Richard Rhodes has a way of taking on big topics and famous incidents and locales from Hiroshima to Hollywood and writing about them in prose that is both accessible and memorable.

Victory at all Costs Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The face of evil

The graphic pictures of a Jordanian pilot being burned alive by militants from the Islamic State, or ISIS, were chilling and raised doubts about the humanity of the Islamic terrorists capable of such barbarism. This coupled with beheadings and crucifixions gives us a better understanding of the evil we, along with the rest of the world, are facing.

Businesses are fleeing California's high taxes and strict regulations. (AP Photo/Lansing State Journal, Rod Sanford)

Fleeing California

More than a century ago, Roy Farmer, 20, went door-to-door in Los Angeles with his bags of home-roasted coffee beans. By the 1930s, Farmer Brothers was selling coffee to restaurants throughout the nation. Today the company employs 1,200 men and women and generates $200 million in annual sales to restaurants, convenience stores, hospitals, hotels and universities.

Corruption of Green Energy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Peeking behind the ‘green’ curtain

This week Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber, a Democrat, leaves office, having resigned under the cloud of a cronyism and corruption scandal. A U.S. attorney has subpoenaed "records that are a catalog of Kitzhaber's climate and economy-related initiatives," centering on money given to Mr. Kitzhaber's fiancee Cylvia Hayes. Ms. Hayes served a curious triple role of "first lady," adviser to the governor on energy policy and well-compensated consultant for the "clean energy" industry.

Smoke billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

Mischief with factoids

Facts are facts, as any reputable scientist would tell you, and if someone tries to change them, like changing a pair of soiled pants, they risk embarrassing exposure. The global warming hysteria is premised on "facts" showing the earth is warming, but these "facts" have been repeatedly exposed as "factoids," the playful invented word of novelist Norman Mailer, to describe something that is presented as fact, sounds like it could be a fact, but is actually not a fact. Surely imposing global restrictions on human activity, which would deny prosperity to the poorest among us, must be premised on something better than factoids.

U.S. Government Waste Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The world’s greatest financial fraudster

The London Times headlined last week, "HSBC helped customers to hide millions from taxman." There are decades of stories about corporations, movie actors, artists and politicians hiding money from the taxman. Many economic studies have shown that once tax rates exceed 20 percent, most people will start thinking about and then acting in legal or illegal ways to avoid the tax bill.

Hezbollah Missiles Supplied by Iran Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hezbollah’s threat to terrorize the world

''Our goal is to liberate the 1948 borders of Palestine [Jews] can go back to Germany, or wherever they came from." That not-so-subtle threat came from a Hezbollah spokesman a dozen years ago. Increasingly, it's looking like more than bravado.

No atheist outcry over Islamic terror

A student at Yulee High School in Florida was recently disciplined for signing off the approved morning announcement by saying "God bless America" ("Florida student sparks fireworks with 'God bless America' intercom sign-off," Web, Feb. 12). Two atheists at the school were angered at that utterance.

A final first-place finish?

It's good to be No. 1. But as any former champ will tell you, you have to avoid becoming complacent if you want to stay ahead of the pack. First-place finishes aren't guaranteed. Just ask Hong Kong.