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Robert Mueller    Associated Press photo

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump’s promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can’t continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it’s also the responsibility of Congress.

Turkey and NATO Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

NATO alliance helping dictators

President Trump found NATO wanting. Then true to form, he acted like a CEO, not a president, serving notice that things had to change, or else. The “or else” he left undefined, creating angst among politicians and policy elites who, sensing their own failures, chose to focus on his manners not his message. Mr. Trump’s poor political decorum notwithstanding, his policy judgment is right. NATO has to change.

Amazon Busts Through the Bricks and Mortar Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Embracing disruption and reinvention

In every age, civilizations embrace technologies that disrupt the status quo. Amazon and its internet brethren may be menacing to brick and mortar establishments but only because they make our lives richer and easier — and there is nothing new about engineers and entrepreneurs doing that.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump greets workers during a visit to the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. More than 300 Carrier Corp. workers were being laid off Thursday, July 20, 2017, from the company's Indianapolis factory as part of an outsourcing of jobs to Mexico that drew criticism last year from then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The benefit of putting health care aside

“It ain’t over till it’s over,” Yogi Berra said in his famous aphorism about losing. And that may eventually apply to the Republicans’ failed attempt to “repeal and replace” President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare.

President Donald Trump listens during a "Made in America," roundtable event in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump facing most hostile press coverage in history

Over and over again, I, and many others, have stated that President Donald Trump has received the most hostile press coverage of any sitting president in U.S. history. Democrats laughed and claimed that former President Barack Obama was treated worse, but the facts don’t lie.

Illustration contrasting Trump supporters and opponents by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The great American divide

You could call it the tale of two election reflections, two competing points of view, two American perceptions of out-of-focus reality. Two important liberal voices “looked back” this week at the November election to try to figure out how and why Donald Trump, whom “everybody” despised and “nobody” wanted to win, actually did.

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its “2017 Congressional Pig Book,” an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress.

The Capitol in Washington is quiet after lawmakers departed the for the Independence Day recess, Friday, June 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Republicans, thy name is mud

- The Washington Times

Republicans, as a party, are reeling at their most recent failure — an epic one — regarding repeal-replace Obamacare. Stumbling seems to be Republicans’ new mode of transportation. What’s insanely angering about it is they’re stumbling over their own roadblocks.

Illustration on the homicidal spirit behind police killings by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the war on cops is a war on all of us

As a writer, I’ve gone out on patrol with police officers, accompanied narcotics squads on drug raids, observed detectives investigating murders and other crimes, and I’ve interviewed police commanders and commissioners in station houses and police headquarters.

Illustration of Vladimir Putin by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putin’s playthings

About a year ago, Donald Trump Jr. met with a mysterious Russian lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya. Mr. Trump Jr. was purportedly eager to receive information that could damage Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign.

Lawyers' Gift from the CFPB Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A consumer bureau gift to trial lawyers

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the arm of the government supposedly looking out for the interests of consumers, has trampled on consumers to deliver Christmas in July for the trial lawyers.

Illustration on the BNP and terrorism in Bangladesh by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terrorism in Bangladesh under the guise of politics

The western media and several otherwise well-intentioned nongovernmental organizations routinely criticize Bangladesh for taking actions against leaders of the country’s main opposition party, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party, or BNP. They assume that accusing opposition party members with crimes is automatically undemocratic and undermines the rule of law.

This undated file photo shows writer George Orwell, author of "1984." (AP Photo, File)

Weaponizing language and communication

Fake news has become known for being a false story, gossip or even lies promulgated by the legacy media. We know what our news media establishment often delivers is nothing more than opinion masquerading as news. That in itself is a huge problem. We’re all learning about how to recognize it and how seriously to take it, if at all.

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FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2013, file photo, Missouri Sen. Eric Schmit, leads a meeting at the Capitol in Jefferson City, Mo. Schmitt, now the Missouri State Treasurer, offered strong criticism of the state budget of Illinois on Tuesday, June 11, 2017, in St. Louis. The first-term Republican spoke at a news conference along the Mississippi River in St. Louis, urging Missouri lawmakers to avoid the pitfalls that have befallen neighboring Illinois. (Kile Brewer/The Jefferson City News-Tribune via AP, File

When the wolf is at the door

In a normal, minimally competently run state, the adoption of the state's budget is news among the ads for toenail fungus cures on Page 12, along with the usual items about dog biting man. Setting budgets, after all, is a routine responsibility of the state, like building roads and keeping the public schools open. Alas, that's more than residents of Illinois can expect.

Treason, anyone?

Hysteria is never a substitute for argument, even when the prey is Donald Trump. This is a caution lost on the hysterics who, try as they might, cannot dispatch the president to the island of lost presidents. So they keep raising the ante of speech and fantasy.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Will we stand up to Russia?

When former KGB apparatchik Vladimir Putin became the capo di tutti capi of the Russian Federation, we should have expected some less than friendly back-and-forth. Then President Barack Obama, urbane and dignified, went all servile in a vain attempt to ingratiate himself with 'Vlad the Bad,' and canceled the anti-missile defense system so patiently negotiated with Eastern European nations by his rough-and-tumble predecessor, cowboy George W. Bush.

In this July 7, 2017, file photo, France's President Emmanuel Macron talks with U.S. President Donald Trump after the family photo on the first day of the G-20 summit in Hamburg, Germany. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

Long live President Trumpopov!

- The Washington Times

You don't have to be a seasoned Kremlinologist steeped in the chicanery of klepto-thugocracies to realize that America really dodged a bullet in last year's presidential election.

The parents of sick baby Charlie Gard, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, right, stand together as a statement is read by a family friend to the media, outside the High Court during an adjournment of their legal hearing to allow treated of their son with an experimental therapy, in London, Monday July 10, 2017. Charlie Gard is on life support at Great Ormond Street Hospital, and remains at the centre of a legal battle to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment for his rare genetic disease, mitochondrial depletion syndrome. (Nick Ansell(/PA via AP)

Charlie Gard v. U.K.: Evil is thy name

- The Washington Times

A British judge told the parents of young Charlie Gard they have two days to prove why their son should be kept alive. Think about that for a second: A government body has just told the parents they have to explain why their son should live.

Illustration on way to neutralize the North Korean threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to neutralize the North Korea threat

Whenever we hear about viable options for stopping North Korea's nuclear ambitions, the answer is always the same: There are none. Any military strike against that country would result in retaliation against South Korea, we are told.

FILE - In this June 30, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. Trump pressed Congress on Monday, July 10, 2017, to get health care done before leaving for its long August recess, even as Republican senators say the GOP effort so far to repeal and replace the nation's health law is probably dead.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump's needed vision

In 1987 when he was contemplating a run for president, Vice President George H.W. Bush was criticized for his inability to articulate an agenda for the country. A friend suggested he spend a weekend alone at Camp David to figure out where he would take the nation.

Miss Universe

Another dead horse, another beating

- The Washington Times

We're finally getting somewhere. Dead horses are useless to most folks, but Democrats, rendering plants and certain newspapers are determined to follow the stink.

Sock Puppet Voting to Unionize Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The rightness of the Employee Rights Act

This week, Senate Republicans will continue working on their proposed health care reform bill, which is polling at 38 percent favorable. Meanwhile, another piece of legislation which polls near 80 percent favorability is hiding in plain sight. The Employee Rights Act (ERA) calls for guaranteed secret ballot elections as a condition of unionization. It requires periodic union recertification after substantial workforce turnover.

Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman, R-Centre conducts a rules comity meeting at the Pennsylvania Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa., Monday, July 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

The dirty secret behind the Senate's Obamacare quandary

Republicans pretend that they are powerless to do more about the great ship Obamacare than to change the fuel on which it runs and rearrange its deck chairs -- never mind to sink it. Because they lack 60 votes to stop "unlimited debate," they claim to be unable to vote even on whether to allow health insurance to be sold across state lines.

Illustration on the development of North Korean nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Mileposts on the road to a North Korean missile

Unless they are wasting a lot of the taxpayers' money, presumably the allied intelligence community knows a lot about Chinese-North Korean missile cooperation.

Reversing the rout in our readiness

With overall federal budget expanding steadily year after year, you'd think not one category of spending has had to suffer. Surely everything that can be funded has all the money it could want or need -- and then some.

Illustration on the CBO by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Notoriously inaccurate

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projected that 21 million people would be enrolled in the Obamacare insurance exchanges by 2016, back when the bill was voted on in 2010. The actual number turned out to be about 10 million -- the projection being off by more than 100 percent.

Pakistani Snakes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pakistan's long history of duplicity

The United States has many complex foreign relationships. Being the world's only superpower requires dealing with the good, the bad and the ugly of nation-states. The good are obvious.

Giving the early champions of individual freedom their due

Sen. Mike Lee of Utah, a former federal prosecutor who serves on several key Senate committees and chairs the Senate Steering Committee, is also author of "Our Lost Constitution: The Willful Subversion of America's Founding Document."