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Obama Legacy: Ex-patriots Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How expatriates are forging an Obama legacy

The State Department recently announced that a record number of Americans in 2014 gave up their citizenship and decided to live elsewhere. Last year’s figure of 3,415 was a 14 percent increase over the previous record, 2,999, in 2013.

Illustration on the National Zoo pandas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What the ‘Save the Pandas’ campaign reveals

For years, the National Zoo has come under fire, including in a blistering 2013 Congressional report over gross negligence, a scathing 2004 National Academy of Sciences report into animal deaths at the zoo and, somewhere in between, an investigation revealing that the zoo had disposed of some wild animals by sending them to a canned hunting outfit and to a petting zoo.

Laws Protecting Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When comprehensive legislation is counterproductive

The announcement by the House Republican leadership that the Innovation Act (H.R. 9) will not be scheduled for a vote this summer has the bill’s supporters concerned but not yet alarmed.

Illustration on the one percent and the American dream by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The American Dream lives

The American Dream couldn’t be more alive but there are those promoting class warfare who are certainly trying to kill it off. A recent Gallup poll (May 2015) shows that 63 percent of those polled feel that wealth and money should be more evenly distributed in America.

Caitlyn Jenner on the cover of Vanity Fair    Associated Press photo

New pronouns for the traveling freak show

- The Washington Times

Caitlyn Jenner, taking pride in his or her decolletage with a smart new frock for his famous Vanity Fair photo shoot, started the madness of the summer of ‘15, but he’s got nothing on the educationist establishment. They’re nothing but boobs (and proud of it).

Mount McKinley Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

McKinley, a mountain moniker no more

William McKinley doesn’t get the respect he deserves. The nation’s 25th president presided over a powerful pivot point in American history.

Pulling the Plug on the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

EPA’s clean power fraud

The Environmental Protection Agency has twisted 280 words in the Clean Air Act into 2,690 pages of Clean Power Plan regulations and appendices.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Aug. 31, 2015

Oil, America’s inexhaustible resource

In August 1859 on the eve of the Civil War, Col. Edwin Laurentine Drake completed the first commercial oil well in the United States on Oil Creek just outside of Titusville, Pa.

Obump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican version of Obama

Americans may finally be tiring of “talking-point presidents.” For more than six-and-a-half years, this is what President Obama has been — telling Americans what they want to hear, while pursuing policies they do not support.

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Illustration on Hillary's private server by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The foibles of front-runners

In all the campaign polls conducted this year, one is more revealing than any other — finding that just one in four Americans are satisfied with our nation's direction.

Solar Straw Hut Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rethinking the solution for poverty

Pope Francis's Laudato Si encyclical on Earth's climate and environment is eloquent and passionate. It is also encumbered by platitudes and errors.

Floodwater from the rising Muskegon River flows over South River Drive in Newaygo County's Bridgeton Township on Wednesday, April 16, 2014. (AP Photo/The Muskegon Chronicle, Ken Stevens)

Restoring fairness to federal land seizures

One of the best-known constitutional guarantees, certainly among landowners, is the right to "just compensation" when the federal government seizes "private property" for "public use."

EMP Graphic to accompany Woolsey article of Aug. 19, 2015

A Shariah-approved nuclear attack

Congress must stop President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran. The most important reason -- Iran can threaten the existence of the United States by making an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack using a single nuclear weapon.

Illustration on the relative safety of oil transport by pipeline by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The safety factor in moving Canadian crude

Debates over oil pipelines seem to be never-ending. The quintessential example being that of the Keystone XL pipeline, which has languished in regulatory limbo for more than 2,500 days.

'Likeability' won't save U.S.

I am now reading that even though Donald Trump is leading the polls owing to his concern for the issues important to Americans and his proposals for dealing with those issues, those who like him say they wouldn't support Mr. Trump in the general election. This is because his "likeability" is lacking.

Taney upheld the law

The three aldermen from Frederick, Md., who voted to expel the bust of Chief Justice Roger Taney from their city hall should review Taney's role in Maryland and U.S. history.

'No' to closing Guantanamo

President Obama is pleased with himself for his diplomatic opening to Cuba. The rest of us wouldn't be pleased with what he wants to close. The president's long-standing goal of shuttering the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay appears to be advancing apace.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernard Sanders is gaining more attention from potential voters in Iowa and New Hampshire due to his straight-shooting style and social agenda. (Associated Press)

When curiosity takes a vacation

Curiosity, not ideology, is the mark of the best reporters, but with the disappearance of tough editors reporters are allowed to be pundits, and it shows. The best reporters are on the scout for "the story." The early story of the 2016 presidential campaign is the emergence of two unlikely, unusual and off-brand candidates, and how the reporters treat them.

An American classroom in early fall. (AP Photo/The Alpena News, Paige Trisko)

Crisis in the schools: GOP hopefuls told to set rhetoric aside during upcoming education summit

- The Washington Times

It could be the first serious dialogue they have on the U.S. school crisis. A half dozen Republican presidential hopefuls bustle into Manchester, New Hampshire on Wednesday for the 2015 Education Summit, and organizers hope they leave their standard talking points in the campaign bus and have an "urgent conversation" about the failing state of American schools.

Let consumers dictate energy mix

In his column "Free consumers from renewable power mandates" (Web, Aug. 6) Thaddeus McCotter raises a valid point regarding states that have chosen to scale back or freeze their renewable-energy mandates. Such actions don't constitute opposition to renewables. "Rather," As Mr. McCotter writes, "Policymakers are concluding that consumer choice and the market will maximize renewable use more efficiently than government fiat."

Dissident diss

Secretary of State John Kerry has taken a lot of heat for refusing to invite Cuban dissidents to today's official flag-raising ceremony at the U.S. Embassy ("Cuba dissidents won't attend U.S. Embassy event," Web, Aug. 12). His justification has been that that there is not enough room to accommodate all the guests. This is disgraceful.

A helicopter makes a water drop on a wildfire in Angeles National Forest above Azusa, Calif., Friday, Aug. 14, 2015. Wildfires racing through drought-stricken Southern California have burned hundreds of acres of land and multiple cabins as the region roasted under a summer heat wave. (Watchara Phomicinda/San Gabriel Valley Tribune via AP) MAGS OUT; NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

Shifting blame for wildfires

Mother Nature is a cruel mistress. Persistent drought in the West has triggered wildfires that have burned over nearly 6 million acres so far this year. Blaming global warming, or capricious "climate change" -- sometimes it's hot and sometimes it's cold, and sometimes it rains and sometimes it doesn't -- is tempting for the environmental extremists.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the at the Iowa Democratic Wing Ding at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

Hillary as comedienne

Hillary Clinton dismisses her email troubles as a joke -- she was having a high old time with it in Iowa the other day -- but there's no evidence that the FBI agents assigned to her case are laughing. Joking about your transgressions while an FBI team is examining your life and times is not smart.

GMO Food and Labeling Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Food labeling, Hollywood-style

The first clue that Gwyneth Paltrow didn't know what she was talking about on Capitol Hill earlier this month came with the first words she spoke: "I'm here as a mother."