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Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It’s been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council — an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies — President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America’s anti-growth tax system.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump’s hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can’t agree on the replacement “plan.”

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump’s meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California’s mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump’s presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration’s top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

CIA Bullies Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The CIA’s affront to Trump

The CIA has denied a security clearance to Trump National Security Council (NSC) official Robin Townley without any allegation, much less evidence of disloyalty to the United States. Quite simply, it is because the CIA disapproves of Mr. Townley’s attitude toward the agency, and this is unprecedented.

President Donald Trump calls out to the media after escorting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to his car to depart the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Intellectual honesty and political indifference

Over the past weekend, Trump administration officials offered harsh criticisms of the judicial interference with the enforcement of the president’s immigration order. The Jan. 27 order suspended the immigration privileges of all refugees from Syria indefinitely and all immigrants from seven designated countries for 90 days.

ISIS Drone Attacks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS drones could target Europe

Killer drones guided by Islamic State terrorists have made their debut in Northern Iraq, prompting concern about a new terror weapon outside of Iraq.

Illustration on the EMP threat to the U.S. from North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

North Korea, the real threat

When might North Korean develop missiles capable of striking the United States? Today.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2017 file picture President of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi , is on his way to a news conference after a meeting of the governing council in Frankfurt, Germany.   The head of the European Central Bank says  Monday Feb. 6, 2017 that its monetary stimulus efforts are still very much needed to support the continent's economic recovery  despite the recent spike in inflation in the countries that use the euro currency. (AP Photo/Michael Probst,file)

Overregulation drags down business

"If I could paraphrase a well-known statement by Will Rogers that he never met a man he didn't like," President Reagan once quipped, "I'm afraid we have some people around here who never met a tax they didn't like."

The Succession of California Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

California dreamin' of secession

Golden State progressives have finally escaped the time loop of Groundhog Day, and conservatives should rejoice.

In this June 25, 2016, file photo, Cub Scouts watch a race during the Second Annual World Championship Pinewood Derby in New York's Times Square.  The Boy Scouts of America announced Monday, June 25, 2016, that it will allow transgender children who identify as boys to enroll in its boys only programs. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

More nibbling at the Scout oath

The assault on everything normal continues. The Boy Scouts of America abandoned the Scout Oath three years ago, which obliged a Scout to "keep myself morally pure," and opened its troops to boys who identify with the homosexual persuasion. Two years later it invited gay Scoutmasters to mentor the boys.

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as he talks with Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, left, during a campaign stop at Milwaukee County War Memorial Center in Milwaukee. Clarke has risen to the national political spotlight with a brash, unapologetic personality reminiscent of President Donald Trump. But while some Republicans swoon over his prospects for higher office, the tough-talking, cowboy-hat wearing lawman remains one of the most polarizing figures in Wisconsin politics. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Uncle Sap no longer lives here

President Trump's ordering of certain mild sanctions against Iran and its friends only stings. Nobody feels much actual pain. But it sends a message to Iran that its testing of ballistic missiles capable of carrying a nuclear weapon violates the spirit, if not the letter, of the agreement it signed with the United States and other nations of the West.

U.S. taking power back from left

Donald Trump assuming the presidency finds an unhinged political left still unable to cope with or accept the reality that President Obama's anti-American transformation is being erased by pro-American restoration.

When a vaunted life and fiction converge

The very term Dame of the British Empire -- the female equivalent of a knighthood in the British gentry -- inevitably summons up a majestic figure. But there was nothing genteel about the British novelist Dame Beryl Bainbridge DBE (1932-2010).

Illustration on exposing subversive elements in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring America's leadership and security

There is no question that on Nov. 8, 2016 we had a political revolution in America. Over 63 million Americans had had enough of President Obama's "fundamental transformation" of America. His embrace of the progressive socialist agenda with its Marxist roots, coupled with his attempt to force the spread of Islam on our Judeo-Christian culture, resulted in not only a failed domestic policy but also a disastrous foreign policy. His actions have left the Middle East in total chaos in addition to creating the greatest strategic instability throughout the world since WWII.

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as he talks with Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, left, during a campaign stop at Milwaukee County War Memorial Center in Milwaukee. Clarke has risen to the national political spotlight with a brash, unapologetic personality reminiscent of President Donald Trump. But while some Republicans swoon over his prospects for higher office, the tough-talking, cowboy-hat wearing lawman remains one of the most polarizing figures in Wisconsin politics. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

A mad man, or maybe a magician

Donald Trump as a real estate dealmaker thrived on chaos -- creating and then exploiting it to achieve his goals. Now as president, Mr. Trump is upsetting allies and disrupting international security and economic arrangements to deliver on his campaign promises to make Americans safer and more prosperous.

Illustration on the need for voter ID laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the North Carolina voter ID case matters

They may never admit it, but the civil rights industry is tired of spending millions of dollars only to lose most voter ID fights in court. Instead of declaring defeat, the strategy has shifted to changing the rules of engagement, and trying to transform the Voting Rights Act into something it isn't. The Supreme Court can now stop this transformation of the Voting Rights Act into a partisan political weapon, if it accepts an appeal from North Carolina.

Executive order necessary

As attested to by the FBI, the U.S. intelligence community is concerned that the Islamic State has the ability to manufacture fraudulent passports ("How Donald Trump strengthens national security," Web, Feb. 1).

A rainbow is shown from Bernal Heights Hill in San Francisco, Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Indigestion at the table

San Francisco has long been on the cutting edge of fine cuisine, the gustatory equal of New York and New Orleans. The city sometimes calls itself "Baghdad by the Bay," a marketing stroke obviously coined by someone who had never been east of Suez, "where the best is like the worst." So when restaurant after restaurant started closing in recent months the foodie fashionistas in San Francisco swallowed hard and asked what happened.