Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the civil rights of the unborn by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the abortion tide turns

Anew Facebook profile photo is beginning to spread on the Internet, especially among members of the rising millennial generation. It’s a picture of a baby within the womb. Superimposed on the baby is an equal sign.

Illustration of myths about the benefits of raising the capital gains tax by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five myths about capital gains taxes

The late, great Jack Kemp, an architect of the Reagan tax cuts, used to say “without capital, capitalism is just another ism.” Capital is the plant, the machinery, the computers, and trucks that businesses invest in to become productive and efficient providers of goods and services.

Empowering individual workers rather than union bosses

This week, Sen Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, and Rep. Tom Price, Georgia Republican, introduced a new proposal to rebalance the rights and the law regarding employees and union bosses. The Employee Rights Act (ERA) is a package of widely supported reforms that will stop workplace abuses of both union and non-union employees by big labor unions. The ERA gives individual employees the power to control their own money, personal information, and choice for legal representation in the workplace.

Illustration on arming airline pilots by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring safety in airliner cockpits

Airline pilots have always been armed, except for a period from 1988 to 2002 when passivity in the face of violence somehow seemed logical. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, many wondered why pilots were ever disarmed. Congress passed the law that rearmed airline pilots with large, bipartisan, veto proof majorities in both houses of Congress. Rearming airline pilots has proven to be safe, very inexpensive and a highly effective deterrent to those who would use civilian airliners filled with innocent people as weapons of mass destruction.

Illustration on Union violence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Closing a union-violence loophole

On July 20, U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson sentenced Joseph Dougherty, the former boss of Philadelphia-based Local 401 of the Ironworkers union, to 19 years in prison for “overseeing a years-long campaign of sabotage, arson, and intimidation,” as Philadelphia Inquirer staff writer Jeremy Roebuck put it. Mr. Dougherty’s targets were nonunion construction employees and employers.

(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Barack Obama, you’re no Ronald Reagan’

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that ” where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be.”

Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Related Articles

Illustration on the Kurds as an effective foe to ISIS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Arming the Kurds to defeat ISIS

In the Game of Thrones in Mesopotamia, the scenario is as Byzantine as it gets, and Team Obama is handling a complex diplomatic and military challenge, with the lives of millions of civilians and combatants in the balance.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Muse'

When a writer who has spent his entire life in the publishing business sits down to write his first novel, what does he write about? Well, that was easy -- publishing, of course.

Illustration on the parameters of televised presidential debates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Striking a balance in televised presidential debates

Increasingly, countries all over the world -- particularly emerging democracies -- are making leaders' debates a part of their electoral processes. In large part, these debates have been inspired by the United States' general election presidential debates, which are carried live on major television networks worldwide.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's changing directions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary's identity crisis

Hillary Clinton's schizophrenic policy positions were on full display at her Monday speech in New York where she laid out her economic platform.

Slippery sentence-commutation slope

I think President Obama's idea to commute the sentences of 46 drug offenders was a good one, but I also think it will create a slippery-slope effect in which people who have been sentenced for other crimes using federal mandatory minimum guidelines will also seek to have their sentences commuted.

President Barack Obama speaks in the Choctaw Nation on economic opportunities for underprivileged communities across the nation, on Wednesday, July 15, 2015, in Durant, Okla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Obama's hissy fit

There is not a lot to love in President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran, despite the attempted assurances in his what's-not-to-like press conference on Wednesday. In addition to the near-unanimous doubts about his "air-tight verification" promises, which he insists make a nuclear arms race in the Middle East less likely, a short list of what's wrong with the deal must include the names of four Americans: Jason Rezaian, Saeed Abedini, Amir Hekmati and Robert Levinson. They're American hostages in Iran, and they just lost their best chance for freedom. Mr. Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry apparently "forgot" to press for their release.

John Kerry     Associated Press photo

The leaking rancid details of the surrender to Iran

- The Washington Times

Reality is moving in on Barack Obama and the gang that can't shoot straight. The sun shines bright and the mice won't find a dark place to hide. The president continues to celebrate the remarkably awful deal he cut with Iran, but the rank and rancid details continue to leak, like something from a neighbor's overflowing toilet upstairs.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Associated Press)

Kiev 2015, Madrid 1936

All historical analogies are odious, some dead white man has written somewhere. It's true that comparisons from one era to another are obviously false because the facts and conditions may be different. They always are.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, front, and U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman meet with foreign ministers of Germany, France, China, Britain, Russia and the European Union at a hotel in Vienna, Austria, Tuesday, July 7, 2015. (Carlos Barria/Pool photo via AP)

Two-thirds of voters say Obama administration deal with Iran needs approval from Congress

- The Washington Times

Voters are only lukewarm when it comes to the nuclear agreement between the U.S. and Iran finalized earlier this week - while two thirds appear particularly troubled by evidence of the "imperial presidency" at work on the global stage. 65 percent of voters believe any agreement the Obama administration makes with Iran regarding the Iranian nuclear program requires the approval of Congress," says a Rasmussen Reports poll released Thursday.

Anything for a legacy

President Obama was so intent and committed to doing something to cement his legacy before leaving office that he agreed to a catastrophic deal with Iran ("Landmark nuclear agreement sparks celebrations in Iran, alarm in Israel," Web, July 14). The deal allows Iran to continue to develop nuclear weapons — without full international inspection of its military installations, and while removing all trade sanctions. This is purportedly to allow Iran to get its economy rolling again, but in reality it means Tehran now has the economic might to expand its support of Islamic terrorism in the region and across the world.

Foreign-policy fools

President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry received their degrees from the same school: Harvard University. Apparently they also graduated from the Neville Chamberlain night school of diplomacy, where both majored in appeasement and capitulation strategies and minored in bowing to foreign leaders.

 Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Director Katherine Archuleta testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington in June. FILE (Associated Press)

Closing the barn door

Katherine Archuleta's resignation as director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management was inevitable, even in an administration with an easy tolerance of incompetence. On her watch, hackers, probably working for the Chinese, opened doors in cyberspace enabling access to millions of confidential files of current and former government employees.

Obama's chance to help Ethiopia

The White House has announced President Obama will visit Ethiopia later this month. Mr. Obama's office has been flooded with letters and faxes of deep concern from Ethiopian-Americans. Under normal circumstances, Ethiopians would rejoice at such a visit. Why the anguish?