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Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Cutting Taxes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A rare chance to boost small businesses

Among the many lessons our current leadership should learn from Ronald Reagan’s effective governance are his initiatives to revitalize the American economy. Most relevant today is remembering President Reagan’s tax cuts and corporate tax reform of 1986 enacted with bipartisan support that produced sustained economic growth.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a sword and sways with traditional dancers during a welcome ceremony at Murabba Palace, in Riyadh. Trump and his entourage were treated to a traditional all-male Saudi sword dance. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the Saudi king, Trump swayed side to side and briefly joined the groove. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump’s vision for the Middle East

President Trump arrived in the Arabian desert hoping to realign the politics of the Middle East in the aftermath of a failed Obama policy. For eight years, President Obama tilted in the direction of Iran, believing that the influence of the Shia could balance Sunni dominance.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security’s Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

The Media Research Center has cited some of the worst "impeachment" talk featured on broadcast and cable networks. (Media Research Center image)

Inside the Beltway: Gauging the worst of the ‘impeachment’ chatter

- The Washington Times

The liberal news media’s unprecedented outcry against President Trump continues, and it constantly mutates. Whether Americans pay attention to all this chatter remains to be seen. Some of the remarks are worse than others, however. Geoffrey Dickens, deputy research director for the Media Research Center, pored over news footage from the last three weeks to determine the best of the worst of the commentary. Or maybe that should be the worst of the worst.

People cry after a vigil in Albert Square, Manchester, England, Tuesday May 23, 2017, the day after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left 22 people dead as it ended on Monday night. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Another lesson from Manchester

After the horrific carnage unleashed by the terrorist attack in Manchester, England, some of the reactions were inexplicable. We’re used to jihadis celebrating the horror of mass murder, but it’s still perplexing to hear Western leaders and media reissue their bizarre insistence that we need to get used to the sick and depraved.

Illustration of Roger Ailes    The Washington Times

Roger Ailes’ exit, stage right

A major threat to the predominance of the Kultursmog in these United States passed away last week, but he had succeeded in what he set out to do, namely: to damage the left in America beyond any hope of recovery. Not many people recognize this, but it is nonetheless true.

Illustration on Turkish security attacks on American protesters in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When armed thugs come to town

Two times in two years, Turkish President Reycep Tayyip Erdogan visited our nation’s capital, and two times in two years his armed thugs attacked peaceful people on our streets. This time, his people sent nine Americans to the hospital.

Illustration on the benefits of biofuel by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cultivating homegrown energy solutions

With all the publicity around fracking, it’s easy to assume that America’s own domestic oil production is more than enough to fuel a growing economy. It certainly helps. But there’s no magic bullet that will ensure long-term American energy security.

Go player Ke Jie, center, speaks at a press conference after playing a match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. Ke Jie, the world's top-ranked Go player, started a three-round showdown on Tuesday against AlphaGo, which beat a South Korean Go master in a five-round showdown last year. (AP Photo/Peng Peng)

The great crawl of China

The world has watched with amazement as China sprints toward its goal of becoming an advanced economy. Average annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 10 percent over the last 20 years has raised hundreds of millions of its citizens out of poverty and transformed China into an economic powerhouse.

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Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, center, flanked by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., speak to the media about healthcare, Tuesday, May 9, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington following a policy luncheon. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Senate scores 'F' for free market

- The Washington Times

The Senate has turned full-force toward repeal, replace, reform, what have you of Obamacare. But senators are talking way more about reform and replace and not so much about outright repeal. And on that, they're doing a major disservice to the free market.

In this Saturday, May 13, 2017, photo, with a Gen. Robert E. Lee statue in the background, people gather at Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va., to protest the plans to remove the monument. (Allison Wrabel/The Daily Progress via AP)

Richard Spencer, you're not helping

- The Washington Times

Revising history, tearing down history and carting away history -- all for the sake of saving someone's hurt feelings -- is a despicable trend of late that's been prompted in large part by minority groups that have finally found a voice. But Richard Spencer, you're not helping.

Differing Costs of Pharmaceuticals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Common-sense remedies for sky-high drug prices

Partisan warfare in Washington never seems to stop. Yet, in poll after poll, Americans want lawmakers to work across the aisle and get things done.

An unsparing accounting of a privileged life

If reading what Joyce Carol Oates memorably dubbed pathographies leaves you with an uneasy feeling about those who so rough up their subjects, this memoir by Patricia is a salutary antidote.

Macron and the Future of the European Union Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Macron's election is unlikely to save the EU

The victory of France's President-elect Emmanuel Macron is good news. If he stays true to his agenda, Mr. Macron's reforms will stimulate hiring, investment and economic growth at home.

Peace a la Putin

Vladimir Putin's Russia continues to be the best example of a nation whose military power is magnified beyond reality by the perceptions it workers deftly to create. Two examples of that deftness were displayed by a massive military parade last week and, the week before that, by Mr. Putin's proposal to stop the war in Syria.

Rowers paddle down the Charles River near the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., Tuesday, March 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Segregated commencement at Harvard

The commencement season is at hand, soon school will be suspended for the summer, and the silly season is at hand. Students are competing with the college dean and the university president to be the Sophomore of the Year.

Comey overstepped bounds

Conspiracy theorists, partisan Democrats, political junkies and other masochists are cranking out a firestorm of stories, claims and counterclaims about why, how and when President Trump fired FBI director James Comey.

Seattle Police Officers stage near a May Day protest, Monday, May 1, 2017, in Seattle.  Immigrant and union groups marched in cities across the United States on Monday, to mark May Day and protest against President Donald Trump's efforts to boost deportations. The day has become a rallying point for immigrants in the U.S. since demonstrations were held in 2006 against a proposed immigration enforcement bill. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

For Republicans, it's getting dangerous out there

- The Washington Times

A Tennessee woman, apparently discontent with her congressman's remarks at a town hall at the University of Tennessee-Martin, did what any normal, curious and courteous constituent would do to have her followup concerns addressed -- she chased his car down, forced him off the road and started screaming and banging on their windows. You guessed it. The congressman, David Kustoff, is a Republican

Sessions' law and order memo likely to irk left

- The Washington Times

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, with one quick stroke of the pen, overturned some lax criminal policies of the previous Barack Obama administration -- the ones that said certain suspects ought to only be charged with minimum offenses. Get ready: The lawsuits from the left are sure to come.