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Warren G. Harding     Associated Press photo

Donald Trump, the unstoppable force of nature. Maybe.

- The Washington Times

The dogs bark, the flies scatter, the gasbags at the conventions send enormous clouds of toxic waste to hover over Cleveland and Philadelphia that won’t dissipate until Labor Day, and the caravan moves on. Election Day approaches, and rarely have so many been so disappointed with the choice before us.

Fathers Absent from "Black Lives Matter" Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s real agenda

Unless you have been “off the grid” for a while, you have heard a lot in the news about Black Lives Matter. This “movement” has gotten a lot of press and some notable praise from celebrities and politicians, including positive mentions from President Obama. But I suspect that most people, including many who have tweeted #blacklivesmatter, have not visited its website.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's position in support of the Democratic base by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s mixed messages

- The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter, Black Panthers, Occupy Wall Street, Socialists, Communists, those who want to strip God from their party platform, LGBTQ activists, Planned Parenthood, Hispanics, white-working class union workers, Wall Street, and climate-change mongers, all have a place in the Democratic Party.

Illustration on the relationship between Pakistani government corruption and the rise of Islamist violence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How religious extremists thrive

As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton spar over security and foreign aid, those of us living in Pakistan wonder how we ended up in the rearview mirror of the debate. American taxpayers spend billions of dollars per year in Pakistan — a nuclear state with religious extremists baying at the door — and next door in Afghanistan, where the Taliban are ensconced.

Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending religious liberty

I write with a deep and growing concern about the future of religious liberty in the United States.

Mike Pence, Conservative Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Pence makes sense

Whenever I talk to conservatives across the country about the presidential election, a common refrain is that they find Donald Trump refreshing in many ways. They like that he eschews political correctness and promises to stand up for ordinary Americans against the elites.

SM-3 Missile Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending against the growing missile threat

Both Iran and North Korea are rogue nations developing and testing new missile technologies at an alarming rate. Iran threatens U.S. forces and has missile technology to carry out those threats. North Korea has successfully tested missiles that can be fired from submarines and is threatening to use them.

Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'Authors in Court: Scenes From the Theater of Copyright'

Mark Rose, research professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, engagingly tells us that he is "a Shakespearean by trade, not a lawyer." He then goes on to confess that "Nonetheless, I have some experience in legal matters, having served as an expert witness in copyright infringement cases for thirty-five years" and that he has lectured and written extensively about copyright and its history.

In this June 16, 2016 photo, CIA Director John Brennan testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Intelligence Committee.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The 28 pages on 9/11

The U.S. House Intelligence Committee finally released 28 pages of the long-suppressed findings of its investigation into the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan, and the interesting stuff appears to have been written between the lines. A reasonably talented sixth-grader can connect some of the dots.

Boris Johnson. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A rousing week for the Gaffe Patrol

- The Washington Times

The Gaffe Patrol, that brave and courageous squadron of the media that sets out to seek and destroy politicians and others who inadvertently say something to offend the code of political correctness, has had a remarkably good week here in the Lower 48.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Ghost Sniper: A Sniper Elite Novel'

With the take-down of Osama bin Laden, the most wanted man in the world, and other bold and brave military actions, the U.S. Navy SEALs and other special operations groups are respected and admired greatly. Although the elite special operators perform in a high state of operational security and secrecy, much has been written about them, as the public is very interested in these seemingly larger-than-life military men.

Washington Nationals manager Dusty Baker (12) signs for fans before a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Saturday, July 2, 2016, in Washington. The Reds won 9-4 in ten innings. (AP Photo/Nick Wass) **FILE**

D.C. sports fans don't need to prove anything

The Nationals crowd, as well as the team, is now being graded about how they will perform the rest of the season. Nationals manager Dusty Baker indicated while they watch a first-place team, the home crowd isn't exactly in first place.

Illustration on the myth of free college by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The pipe dream that is 'free college'

Hillary Clinton's plan to make college free for low- and middle-income families does not address the most fundamental challenges in higher education. No matter who pays, universities have become costly and wasteful and do a poor job of equipping young people to earn a living.

Illustration on Soros funded radical organizations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beware the Soros zombies

Billionaire George Soros has funded liberal organizations intent on bringing confusion, disarray and trouble to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland next week.

Gen. David Petraeus. ** File (Associated Press)

Why Obama must pardon Gen. David Petraeus

Anyone who served in the military understands the underlying principle of getting the bottom line up front. Because in a war zone there is always a chance the "messenger" might not get to complete their report or dispatch due to hostile fire.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Hampton, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Mortal wounds for TPP

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP in the jargon of the trade negotiators, looks dead. The cosmeticians at the mortuary say so. Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are competing to preside over the funeral but U.S. Trade Ambassador Michael Froman says he and his colleagues are hearing encouraging noises from various members of Congress. He thinks that the deal may soon move forward.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during the Innovation Showcase, Thursday, July 14, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

The Pence choice

Unless he changed his mind overnight -- and "Surprise" and "Unpredictability" are his middle names -- Donald Trump finally picked his running mate and by all accounts it's a good one. Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana is the real goods.

School choice means innovation

Israel Teitelbaum (and many others) miss the boat when they focus on liberty and "freedom to choose" as the key justification for charter schools, vouchers and the Education Freedom Accounts Act ("'A Republic — if you can keep it,'" Web, July 12).

Trump's no dunce

Wesley Pruden's comment that there is "ample evidence that the Donald is an uneducated lout" reminds me of Clark Clifford's remark that President Ronald Reagan was an "amiable dunce" ("The election to terrify us all," Web, July 11).

Cleveland Browns running back Isaiah Crowell apologized for posting a graphic on Instagram that depicts the brutal killing of a police officer. (Associated Press)

Isaiah Crowell, Minnesota Lynx actions show sports, society continue to collide

Sports take place in such public arenas (literally), it's unrealistic to think everyone will get along and play nice without the threat of uniformed, armed police officers on hand. It's also unrealistic to expect lockstep-thinking and behavior from the athletes. They have a platform and some will use it to express their opinions, no matter how they might conflict with your or anyone else's thoughts.

Vilifying officers endangers lives

Police actions in Ferguson, Mo., New York, Baltimore, Baton Rouge, La., and Minnesota have been in the news, and a few police officers have been seen using excessive force and shooting people. I believe a small number of police officers use excessive force, and these officers should be held accountable for their actions. However, the vast majority of police officers diligently do their duty and treat criminals and suspects fairly.

Illustration on the court's reaffirmation of Fourth Amendment rights by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A slapdown of civil asset forfeiture

David, meet Goliath. Incredibly enough, a small-town Maryland dairy farmer and his wife just won their legal claim against the Internal Revenue Service and Department of Justice and will now be able to recoup tens of thousands of dollars seized in what turned out to be an unconstitutional application of civil asset forfeiture.

Ginsburg's constitution contempt

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's disdain for the political process parallels her contempt for the U.S. Constitution ("Donald Trump on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: 'Her mind is shot -- resign,'" Web, July 13).

Maggie Kiser, 2, waves a flag as she is pulled along by her grandfather, Gary White, during the Amarillo Street Neighborhood Parade in Abilene, Texas, Monday, July 4, 2016. (Tommy Metthe/The Abilene Reporter-News via AP)

Redefining patriotism

Patriots proliferate on the Fourth of July, with the red, white and blue all around. But after the fireworks fade from the night sky the Stars and Stripes are often relegated to the back of the hall closet. In 2016, so the pollsters find, many are not so proud to be Americans.